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7

If your opponent throws a knee while not in clinch a good way to stop it is to extend your arm (jab) to their chest. If you lean slightly into it your arm should reach longer than their knee. You may as well hit the chin instead of the chest. If you are locked in the clinch you can try to throw your opponent off balance as soon as they lift their leg to ...


4

I went through ACL recon in 2015 November, was pretty lazy in rehab and ended with a weak hamstring. I have always been told and recommended that kicks with the knee that was repaired generally will take longer to feel natural again, especially in relation to pivoting on the operational leg. I was able to do roundhouses after 7 months and pivoting on the ...


4

From the clinch: Close the distance: keep your posture and get your hips close to their hips so there is no way for them to generate the power to throw a knee. Be wary of trips or takedowns, or do them yourself. Trip them to the opposite side: when they do a knee, especially one from the side, rotate them rotating them in the direction of their standing leg....


3

Knee instability is usually as a result of one of two things - You either have a pre-existing injury that is contributing to the instability, or you have muscle weakness that is contributing. (This is assuming no congenital defects). For the first, you may have to supplement with braces and/or corrective surgery. While you can protect the area with proper ...


3

Here are a small list of styles to look into. They're all hand dominated and have forms: Wing Chun kung-fu Southern Praying Mantis kung-fu Hung Gar kung-fu Pentjak Silat Taiji (Tai Chi) Many other styles would qualify. For example, I listed a few southern styles of kung-fu up there. There are a lot more southern styles than that. And they do tend to be ...


3

I don't think Tai Chi has many of these. It does have a few low knee bends but even these seem to be comparatively rare. It is also very form based.


3

First, you need to keep your own posture strong. Then you need to force them to stand up straight, usually by placing your own forearm across their face. They can't throw knees if they are standing up straight. Second, you can force an arm between theirs, and then use it to lever yourself out of the clinch. Or you can stand them up straight, grab the side ...


3

I am not overly familiar with the rules, but I found the elbow to be very effective against knees. The elbow should make impact with the muscle of the upper leg, as connecting with the knee will be too dangerous for the defender. Elbows are also great for "discouraging" kicks to the ribs and it has the added benefit of keeping your hands in a position to ...


2

This answer is mostly just in support of the others... Muscle strength is the best way to overcome a relatively minor knee problem and avoid future injuries. I partially tore my ACL about 10 years ago and had constant knee pain until I started spending 3 to 4 hours a week practicing Tang Soo Do. Four specific exercises that greatly strengthen legs and ...


2

Taekwondo, especially, seems to be a great destroyer of knees. Pretty much everyone I know at high levels in the art has experienced knee injury at some point. I think this is because of the right angles the stances and footwork place your feet at. Because of the way that TKD movements are structured, placing weight on the heel of the foot during a pivot ...


1

In sparring, knees are rarely damaged by direct hits. This is because just about everyone trains to hit the thigh and not do any of the shots that would really wreck knees - you don't want to destroy your training partners. You'll note that most martial arts do not use knee protection for this reason. The usual threats to knees are bad twisting motions ...


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