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"Israeli Jiu-Jitsu" seems to appear in two contexts: Describing BJJ and/or Japanese Jujutsu techniques as adapted and incorporated into some styles of Krav Maga (which has its origins in incorporating techniques from a variety of older martial arts: boxing, wrestling, judo etc), e.g. as taught by Roy Elghanayan. Describing Jiu-Jitsu organisations/schools/...


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Ephraim has it 100% correct. Number one rule is to keep your balls inside the cup and the cup tight to your groin. I typically wear boxer brief underwear with a pouch and a 3” athletic supporter with knit pouch (traditional jockstrap) and shorts on top. I use hard contoured athletic cups, often referred to as a ‘banana cup’. Five minutes before Krav Maga ...


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This is not a question of style, but of human decency and staying within the bounds of law. Maximum damage instead of necessary force only is both immoral and illegal. Every responsible instructor will tell you that. Apart from that, it is impossible to design a useful training when focusing on maximal damage only. Either it will lack resistance or produce ...


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Basically, yes: Pankration was a sporting event introduced into the Greek Olympic Games in 648 BC and was an empty-hand submission sport with scarcely any rules. The athletes used boxing and wrestling techniques, but also others, such as kicking and holds, joint-locks and chokes on the ground making it similar to modern MMA. [wiki] Just that they'd be ...


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Krav Maga has indeed incorporated techniques from Aikido since the 1970's: In 1968 Eli Avikzar began learning Aikido underneath the guidance of an Englishman named Mike and became his coaching partner after a year. Mike was astounded by Eli’s fast progress and allowed him to go abroad for his Black Belt training in Aikido. Following mike’s advice, Eli left ...


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