7

Despite ice's enduring popularity and former recommendations for its use in RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation) treatment, ice is no longer recommended for reducing inflammation or bruising. Gabe Mirkin, MD, who first coined the RICE mnemonic, explains on his blog dated Sept 2015 that ice delays recovery from injury. PhysicalTherapyWeb tells a similar ...


7

The most sensible advice about exercise after giving birth comes from authoritative medical organizations such as this: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/labor-and-delivery/in-depth/exercise-after-pregnancy/art-20044596 They state that in the past it was recommended that women wait for at least 6 weeks after vaginal birth to do any exercise. But ...


6

This is going to be something of a trial and error method for you, I think. You're going to have to try a bunch of things and go with what works the best or sucks the least. First of all, if your instructor outright bans shoes, that's one thing. If your instructor says no shoes "because" of some reason, then you have a little wriggle room. In that case, see ...


4

Any sanctioned event will have event medical staff on hand to revive competitors immediately if they do not regain consciousness on their own. Medical staff may recommend hospital treatment. There are two distinct cases for restricting activities afterward depending on how one becomes unconscious. I don't know what the guidelines are for MMA specifically, ...


4

I believe I have might be able to help. My chiropodist and I have been working on a martial arts orthotic device for several years now. We have created a barefoot sports (martial arts etc.) arch support based on a ankle sleeve support concept, so it's not a shoe and the orthotic arch support is a medium density EVA foam shaped specifically to offer support ...


2

I'd like to address the "how to evaluate a school" part of the question from personal experience. Brief context: I fenced foil in my teens, did aikido and wing chun in my 20s. I got osteoarthritis in my knees at age 35 (Dad blamed my dancing, I blamed all the kneeling from Catholic school). For years I couldn't walk without a stick; I even changed ...


2

Although there are many answers, it doesn't seem like your question has been adequately addressed. You list two requirements: kind to my joints (etc.) practical outside the ring (by this I assume you mean you need to defend yourself) I'm going to advocate a two part strategy. Tai Chi training. Gun training. I don't think there is any doubt that Tai Chi ...


2

You list two distinct types of injuries which require different kinds of avoidance (which I think is the key: avoiding the injuries to begin with, yes?) In one, you mention the kicking pads. We use a variety of pads, one is called "elephant ears". These are usually held in one hand, so, you hold two. For kicking drills, I get clever about holding one pad ...


2

Get the Be Careful Badge. That is it. When you grow old, your body takes time to recover from injuries that you shrugged when you were younger.


2

A Technical Knockout (TKO) only really exists in the context of sport, and refers to a set of circumstances which are considered equivalent to a knockout in the context of a match. It is not a medical term, but then again, neither is knockout. There is a common misconception that being knocked out is like going into a deep sleep, and that almost never ...


2

A broken or dislocated jaw usually heals well after treatment. But the jaw may become dislocated again in the future. In the US, Columbia University, College of Dental Medicine has done some pioneering work in treatment & therapies related to jaw injuries. So it would be a good idea to touch base with their medical experts. Your doctor will diagnose ...


1

Here is my attempt at answering this question based on the research I have done, happy for others to comment or add another better answer. On this website, fractures incur a 180 day medical suspension, and joint injuries 60 day medical suspensions. Therefore the logical answer would be that clearance wouldn't be given until this period has lapsed, although ...


1

Jujutsu Schools all have a Kyusho "striking point" chart. You would aim for these points when attacking in order to do the most damage i.e. the solar plexus. Some of those points were used for resuscitation as well. Pressure was applied in various combinations to revive people who had passed out (during training, due to heat,) drowned or fallen from a ...


1

Technical Knockouts(TKO) does not imply the person is actually knocked out. It just means they are unable to continue.


1

What Is A Bruise A bruise is a rupturing of the capillaries under the skin which causes blood to pool in the adjacent tissues. Swelling and increased pressure from the bleeding causes the firing of nerve endings in the area, which the brain translates as pain. Treating a Bruise Bruising heals in accordance with the severity of the damage to the tissues, ...


1

You should try keep your muscles in shape by doing light exercise without harming any damaged part (if it is the joint, then avoid exercise with impact. Walk and make rotations in water, or do exercise in the air with some weight attached to the leg). After some light training, take a rest until your tone gets normal. This is to check if all goes well. ...


1

Ving tsun, wing chun, are easy one the legs, it's mostly close range hand techniques. Not as much pushing and pulling and jumping as other arts. The idea is to immobilize fast. Simultaneously as you defend you attack with speed. The first form builds strong tendons and joint in the arms. Speed comes with practice. The leg techniques are effective and ...


1

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu my friend! A lot of people who get injuries from Judo go into BJJ as it's a lot softer on the joints as opposed to other martial arts such as Thai Boxing. It is also effective as opposed to pointless martial arts based on forms such as Karate or TKD that don't encourage sparring against a live opponent.


1

Tai chi would typically be an ideal art for older people, but finding someone that really knows the martial aspects of the art today is darn near impossible. Any of the softer more internal martial arts of the gung-fu family would certainly work as there are special techniques in gung-fu known as handicapped fighting which is helpful for those with ...


1

I agree with dandellion, but I can't add a comment under his post (or upvote it) since I haven't built up enough reputation points yet. Berin says he (I'm assuming. please correct me if I'm wrong) that he doesn't want to practice an internal art. I would challenge this statement by saying that it's a more-than-effective martial art in terms of practicality,...


1

I would like to throw in another view I found effective and, considering the explanation behind that, coherent: A physiotherapist once told me that while cooling directly after the blunt trauma is of course important against the swelling, a different treatment should be considered afterwards. As bruises include ruptures of capillaries, therefore an ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible