9

It's certainly possible to hit someone while they work on a takedown. It sounds like you're asking specifically about countering wrestling shots, where the grappler attacks the hips and legs, rather than clinch takedowns generally, so I'll focus on that. (Nevertheless, remember that upper-body clinch takedowns are common and effective as well.) Punishing ...


8

Grappling is not predominant in modern MMA, and hasn't been for a decade or two, so the "matches seem to pivot on one competitor being forced against the cage...moving to the ground, and decided by definitive locks or holds" premise of the question is invalid. MMA matches are overwhelmingly striking contests. Professional competitors in the modern ...


6

The orthodox BJJ response to someone on your back with hooks is to first strip the hooks then shuck them off, while protecting the neck. One can do this by standing upright and pushing the hooks down, but the more orthodox method is to bend forward to touch the ground, keeping the hips high, in order to make them slip forward over your shoulders once they ...


6

There is a judo version of this question about the difference between a sensei (mentor) and coach (cornerman). The United States Judo Federation has a long answer to this question that considers the cultural history and etymology of these words, what functions they perform, and how the roles may overlap, but basically comes to the conclusion that the ...


6

From my experience in sparring without a gi both with and without gloves/wraps, there will be two main differences: Some submissions, like straight armbars, might become more difficult since it is easier to slip out (or retain control) when the arm doesn't get stuck at the wrist due to the glove. To talk more generally, things get more slippery. Due to ...


6

Usefulness of "dangerous" moves why haven't we seen more people landing badly (or purposefully) on legs and breaking them? Because it's actually really hard to cause damage with these moves, and a lot of that is just luck. They're banned because a small but significant percentage of attempts will, due to a the opponent's split-section reaction ...


5

Apologies for the late answer. While I am shadow boxing, I always wonder if it's necessary to ... Yes. It is absolutely necessary that you do everything in your shadowboxing that you would do in your sparring sessions or fights. If you like throwing the spinning side kick when you are sparring, you must throw hundreds of them when you are shadowboxing. The ...


5

People who become MMA fighters usually start out learning one style first. As the sport has progressed over the years, teaching people how to mix different styles together has changed. Now, with more experienced teachers, students benefit as techniques and teaching methods evolve. Boxing My first combat style was boxing. I was trained to fight with left foot ...


5

For a contrary opinion on "real world fight situations", those often aren't one-on-one. They often devolve into one person grappling the other, and then his friends joining in to beat on their opponent whilst he's held down. Historically that's the purpose of grappling as an unarmed battlefield technique too. If you've lost your weapon (and ...


4

One of the things that is present in Steve's answers that he linked in his comments is that neither style is going to do much to prepare you for MMA due to a lack of active resistance. I've done a bit of Bujinkan and Wing Chun (more of the former) as well as several other styles, and they don't really do the sort of free-sparring that happens in MMA where ...


4

The vast majority of wing chun and bujinkan schools would be more likely to have a net negative effect on your MMA training than a net positive effect. You're better off spending your time doing strength and conditioning, or looking for a school that spars.


4

"Hey. Don’t ever let somebody tell you ... You can’t do something ... You got a dream. You gotta protect it. People can’t do something themselves, they wanna tell you you can’t do it. If you want something, go get it. Period." - Will Smith, Pursuit of Happiness. That quote should tell you that you can do this. But there is a process. And it will ...


4

Requirements - this is more about local laws/business question. If it is for money - then it is more about your business/marketing/communication skills. If it is about sports/MA spirit - it depends. Coaching is not just a work - it is a great responsibility. It is like being a teacher. You're responsible for the things you teach your students. And HOW you ...


3

Did [Kayla Harrison] focus on learning BJJ [as she pivoted to MMA], or stick more with and Judo and Japanese Jujitsu? Neither. As far as I can tell she took the correct approach and switched to wrestling-for-MMA and how to specifically adapt her judo to gloved, caged, no-gi situations. You can tell because her MMA strategy demonstrates specific techniques ...


3

As per the provided link, there's a number of factors going on. First of all, a kiai is as much about a forceful exhalation and a focus of purpose as it is actually yelling. Many of the fighters do just that grunting or exhaling on a heavy strike. One of the other purposes of a kiai is to startle the opponent. In the Octagon, most fighters are prepared for ...


3

BJJ and MMA have relatively more groundwork than judo because of rule differences unrelated to the combat area size and cage. In judo, throws are nominally scored with four criteria: speed, force, control, and back exposure. If all of these criteria are met, the thrower is declared the winner so there is no continuation into groundwork. Judo groundwork is ...


3

One change, relatively minor, but important individually, is that it might further reduce the risk of injuries due to hidden weapons. Aside from the stereotypical weighted gloves sometimes seen in media for boxing, some MMA competitions have problems with loaded hand wraps and the consequences can be career ending (the linked video is Ramsey Dewey recounting ...


3

It does not make much of a difference whether you aspire to train the next champion full-time or just want to help some people having some fun with martial arts: you will need the ability, dedication, and ideally a license to have something worth offering. Ability Having some training does not suffice. You need to have the technical ability to demonstrate, ...


2

I have been self-training kickboxing for a couple of years and have trained in Kyokushin karate for some time when I was around 11 years old. For someone with this background, the first step to becoming a coach would be to start training. After that you should compete, preferably more than once. Then you would have to help other trainees compete. It is not ...


2

First off, I'm going to make it clear that just because there are escapes from this position, does not mean that you would EVER want to end up here. Escaping, especially in realistic conditions requires both patience and the ability to act fast and decisively. So, I'll walk through some scenarios: It doesn't matter how you ended up there, but you find ...


2

Wrestling and judo were not unknown, but particularly outside of Olympic season generally weren't featured much. Pancrase, shootwrestling etc. were largely a curiosity among pro wrestling enthusiasts. BJJ was featured in movies like Lethal Weapon but exploded after UFC1.


2

First of all to answer this we need to think about what a knockout is. A Knockout is not a medical term. It is a competition term. The term's use varies between competition styles, but basically it amounts to this: A Knockout is when your opponent can no longer continue to fight you. So while your opponent may be unconscious they don't have to be. For ...


1

As always, it depends. Some points on the body may cause knock out if you hit them. The more precise you hit, the less power you need. Knock out is often a matter of nerve strikes. So your highschool guy had some experience hitting them. If you hit someone away from these points, it hurts, it may break bones or rip tissue. So the pain makes them more or less ...


1

I think it's not an unreasonable assumption that the introduction of weight classes, and movement away from old-school no-holds barred and Gracie Rules has greatly facilitated the contemporary sport of Mixed Martial Arts. (This should in no way be taken as disrespect toward Brazilian Jujitsu and the Gracie family, as they were the original drivers of the ...


1

While in MMA training, people have to rotate partners, and the weight, sizes, and genders are all going to be different. During training is where you learn to deal with bigger opponents. It's actually encouraged in order to motivate you to become more skilled. It's well known that weight and reach makes a big difference in outcomes of fights of all kinds, ...


1

The Ali/Innoki debacle might provide some insight. In this match, held in a traditional boxing ring, Innoki was unable to keep Ali on the ground and engage him in a wrestling match. And, b/c Innoki stayed on the ground the entire fight, Ali was able to, at one point, jump up on the ropes to avoid the kicks to his legs. I’ve been doing a little research and ...


1

Mentors talk about the question. Cornermen answer the question and solve the problem. Thank you for making that so clear. I prefer a cornerman.


1

The joint on final travel is very weak so mechanical advantage of above the average person is useless .The pain tolerance maybe it's higher because of this ability but if you twist the trapped arm or feet the pain will come . Because immobilisation came before applying the pain techniques this double joint feature is no guarantee to escape but will probably ...


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