14

I will present a judo view of sparring, which will be partially applicable to a kickboxing situation. Judo has two key principles: mutual welfare and benefit maximum efficiency As applied to sparring, the first principle means that you both need to get something out of your time practicing together. If there is a large strength or size disparity (adult v. ...


12

As a short answer, I'd say that it comes down to trust and pattern recognition. Respect the level of experience. During sparring, if the woman recognizes the patterns in your attack and defends with the right moves, then you can increase your intensity. If she's lobbing punches and kicking when there's no chance of connecting, ease up. If you don't want a ...


6

I think Sylvie conveys the right feeling in this article: I’ve fought over 100 times in Thailand and honestly I have never had a completely clear picture of what is and is not a legal throw in Muay Thai. There are some very obvious fouls, but others seem a gray area. I’ve had a vague sense that you cannot lift an opponent, or that you can’t “back break”, ...


6

I'm not sure why you feel the need to adapt your sparring to women specifically. I always try to adapt my sparring to the person I'm sparring with: make it interesting and challenging for them if I can, and let them do the same for me. Always agree on the level of power (which can be implicit with people you know, but with smaller/less powerful people than ...


4

Is it better to step to the right to generate more momentum, or would that typically be too slow? For purposes of easing exposition, I will use basic-lead-snap-roundhouse (= no stepping to the right) and step-right-lead-roundhouse (= step to the right with your right leg and kick with the left leg) to differentiate between the two. Context is King! There is ...


4

In general, the more power you want to put in a roundhouse kick, and the more you want it to penetrate the target, the more you should pivot that supporting foot (and possibly start by stepping to the side of the kick). The reason why is fairly obvious in that you need to be able to deliver the full power of the kick close to the center of your body and, ...


3

Women are not children. You can use proper technique when sparring them. Lighten up according to their size and how seriously they train. A good rule of thumb is to hit them as hard as they hit you. Use all techniques, just lighter. Watch sparring between high level people to get a sense for how they tone down intensity while still being technical with an ...


3

After the jab-cross, I'd almost always throw another jab as I rotate back, and if the distances are all fine as is, kick without moving the back foot. If you've shifted the front foot across to make room for the back hip to rotate through to power the cross, then you'll tend to be inside the line of their front foot (so if they lifted that foot straight up ...


3

Especially given you're having to rotate back from the cross, I think that the extra step is, indeed, generally too much. It, of course, may be useful if you need a little extra distance, or a pause to throw off your opponent's timing.


2

At my school (karate), we're taught to tell our partners if we want less power (or more). And if someone asks, then we change what we're doing immediately. We also don't use techniques our partners don't have the curriculum for, especially if there's a big experience gap. I regulate my sparring based on size and experience of my opponent, not gender. I'd say ...


1

There is an old russian wisdom - "who don't take risks would not drink champaign". If you are aware of brain trauma, maybe it would be better to pick something other - without intensive full-contact punches to the head. Muay-Thai (along with boxing and KB) do allow strict strikes to the head with arms. And that work is usually very intensive. And, ...


1

If you are training for explosive power, I'd prefer the shuffle step, the second one, as it's a more dynamic move with more sudden movement. Of course, if you're having trouble controlling the roundhouse afterwards, you may want to use the first movement as it's easier to do slowly until you can get a consistent smoothness. Also, if you're unstable after the ...


1

Basically, yes: Pankration was a sporting event introduced into the Greek Olympic Games in 648 BC and was an empty-hand submission sport with scarcely any rules. The athletes used boxing and wrestling techniques, but also others, such as kicking and holds, joint-locks and chokes on the ground making it similar to modern MMA. [wiki] Just that they'd be ...


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