14

Long story short, they wanted to drop one sport so that they could add another, and they cited low ticket sales, low popularity, low TV ratings, and a lack of oversight and diversity. The board voted after reviewing a report by the IOC program commission that analyzed 39 criteria, including TV ratings, ticket sales, anti-doping policy and global ...


10

There are several reasons, but in my opinion, they are somewhat of a cop-out - and yet a relief. Keep in mind, getting into the Olympics is a herculean task: there needs to be a federation representing 75 countries on 4 continents (for men) and 40 countries on 3 continents (for women), anti-doping policies, "modern appeal", media interest, promote gender ...


8

What makes multiple events fall under the same sport? They all have the same governing organization. Many individual martial arts cannot keep their affairs within one organization because of too much infighting. It is unlikely they will agree with organizations outside their own martial arts about how to manage competing interests. Look at the hostility ...


7

Judo rules and scoring have changed over the years, so I am providing an update for 2016. Differences from older answers are in pin times and treatment of penalties. Scores There are three positive scores: ippon - a match ends immediately if when an ippon is scored. Referee signals with arm pointing to ceiling. wazari - if a player scores two wazari, ...


5

TL; DR: It has to do with the fact that they have separate international governing bodies (see breakdown below). The Olympics have a tiered classification system, that can be a bit confusing if you look at each different thing as a "sport", like you would for general consideration. These tiers are: Sport - Top tier, and there are limitations on the number ...


5

I have seen no official documentation for this decision, so I can only relay what I have heard from international referees on this subject. Olympics The word in US referee clinics at this time was that judo was in danger of being removed from the Olympics because it was too easily confused with existing wrestling events. Remaining in the Olympics was seen ...


5

According to the Sport and Organization Rules of the IJF (2019), the following applications of katame-waza are illegal: Kansetsu-waza Joint-locks applied anywhere other than the elbow (i.e. neck, spine,17 shoulder, wrist, hip, knee, ankle, finger,16 toe locks etc).1 The leg-lock ashi-garami is explicitly illegal.14 Exception: The shoulder-locks ude-garami ...


4

The average age of medalists in Olympic Taekwondo is 24 years old for males, 23 years old for females. The medalists go up to over age 30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863920/ The average age of the Olympic Taekwondo team for the U.S. is 27. There are competitors and medalists who are over age 30. No, you don't need to have started Taekwondo ...


3

Note: As of Tokyo 2020, karate is an Olympic sport. Whether a sport is recognised as an Olympic sport is ultimately up to the International Olympic Committee (IOC). To qualify, a sport must necessarily: conform to the terms of the Olympic Charter have an international governing body recognised by the IOC file an application for inclusion through the IOC ...


3

To directly answer your question, it is a guess, but I'd say that politics prevents it from happening in the future, and momentum prevented it in the past. As to politics, it's hard enough to get a bunch of grandmasters to agree on what to have for dinner, let alone agree to working together on inter-organization support for a global effort - every 4 years. ...


2

Disclaimer: Since this question was asked the IJF scoring rules have changed multiple times e.g: Koka, Yuko no longer exist Chui, keikoku no longer exist 2 waza-ari = waza-ari awasete ippon 3 shido = hansoku-make The following information is current as of 2019. 1. Default board Neither White nor Blue have scored any points (score ...


2

Here is the justification given by the IJF in their notification of amendments to the Refereeing Rules from 2010 which introduced the ban on leg-grabs: Introduction The IJF's wish is to defend fundamental judo values. Within this scope IJF particularly devotes itself to preserve and develop education, physic and mental trumps of Judo. « ...


1

True Taekwondo is nothing like Olympic Taekwondo. There is a lot of things that appear to be the same and can do the same damage. Yet how the fighter is taught the Art will differ based on the Master and the style. Based on the Olympic style fighting I see no reason why any martial art with a great foundation would be at a disadvantage. Another fighter ...


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