12

This is a good question. And to answer it, you have to understand why karate kata (forms) exist, what their original purpose was, and how kata practice differs from sparring. The original purpose of karate kata was to pass on self-defense technique to students. Each self-defense technique consists of one to three movements strung together in the sequence of ...


10

plowing through the drills as my partner moves in tandem There's a good version of this and a poisonous version of this. The good version is that your padholder is calling for combinations on the fly and you are responding mindlessly. That's super. That's mushin-no-shin. The bad version is that you are a rock-'em-sock-'em robot. If both of you are ...


8

Obviously, the sourcing is kind of messy, but considering Hal Sharp used to actually be in personal contact with this man, a video of his will have to suffice for validation. Yoshimi Osawa, 10th Dan, said, "There are three types of judoka, Recreational.. practices for enjoyment. Technical.. studies, practices, and teaches most of their life ...


6

The question is: What martial arts are similar to Wing Chun? The question does seem like it is open to interpretation. It depends on which aspects of Wing Chun you're looking at. But without going into every permutation of different attributes, I want to cut to the chase and mention one martial art that comes to my mind the most. That would be Southern ...


5

People get hurt sparring, and they get hurt worse fighting. This is a fact of life. It's why professional fighters may only fight a few times a year, and why you can't just pound each other in martial arts class all the time. Some injuries are permanent. If you are injured all the time, you can't train and possibly can't work either. There's a reason why ...


5

Hsing I (Xing Yi) is a direct and to the point efficient kung fu system not overly dependent on muscular strength. Its goal is to close the gap and seize the opponent's ground. It is an internal art. I Liq Chuan is also a very interesting art with sticky hands practice. These would be my choices in addition to Wing Chun.


4

First and foremost, if you do not trust your instructor, it makes no sense whatsoever to train with them… Therefore you should trust them in teaching you useful things, in helping you progress, and in keeping you safe in class. This means that you should trust them when they say you reached a new grade. Second, a grading is you demonstrating that you can do ...


3

Trepidation is normal. You have expectations about what rank means, and you are not sure whether you can live up to the expectations of a new rank. Many people have this reaction. Analogy: Learning/Teaching Martial Arts is like Painting a Wall A good analogy for the initial promotion process is painting a wall. You want the wall to look good, but it's not ...


3

While Steve and Mattm's answer are excellent and do a great job of putting the quote into the context of Bruce Lee's life, I would like to add my take on it. Bruce Lee's quote is not aimed at beginners (aka 2/3 years of training) but at those that already learned the basics of an art (whatever that art is, shodan or 3/4 years of training) and are now ...


3

I think what Bruce Lee and those who have said similar things both before and after him are getting at is that it's a process, not a set product. Through this process, you take what seems to work "better" at the time you're testing it, and you discard the "worse" which came before. At any point in that journey, you can never say you've found the ultimate ...


3

Fighting Specialization: Everyone cannot excel at everything Ultimately, you do not need many techniques to win a fight. What is the point of studying all of the kicks if you only need a handful, and learning all of them distracts from becoming good at a few? You are better off specializing in the handful of techniques and becoming proficient in them. ...


3

There is one main source you can base your knowledge about the art on: Higaonna, M. (2001). The History of Karate: Okinawan Goju-ryu. Dragon Books. Morio Higaonna is the current epitome of Goju Ryu, head instructor for decades, the highest-ranking practitioner, and a third generation student, taught by the students of the style's founder, Chojun Miyagi. ...


3

I am an Aikido practitioner, but I think it is very similar to Hapkido in this regard. The answer is: YES First of all, the belt test is not only to examine if you have advanced enough, but also to see how do you perform under stress. Being able to use the techniques under some controlled stress conditions is a crucial part of martial arts. As it is not ...


3

The earliest reference I can find to this quote is from the following: Three types of attitude are discussed next: training attitude. competitive attitude, and personal attitude. First, training attitude refers to your willingness to train and the work ethic that you develop through regular practice. Second, a competitive attitude refers to your ...


3

mattm and Steve have adequately covered the angles of injury and the basis of kata. I would also add two more factors, efficiency and the need to set a physical foundation. Efficiency It's not easy to make money with a martial arts school without going down the route of a McDojo and gouging money with belt fees, contracts, etc. Typically, your two routes ...


2

If you are a beginner in Muay Thai, the pad drills are key and should typically make up a good percentage of your gym time, along with western boxing exercises, footwork, skipping, etc. A gym should also include sparring drills and some light sparring, although most USA gyms will not include anything that increases liability risk with non-fighters. I am ...


2

You are mixing up karate (the art) and karate-do (the "way", or "the whole", one's journey with karate). Most schools and/or instructors weave spiritual (philosophical) teachings into their syllabus and training, this comprises the "-do" and is distinct from karate as an art. There can be a lot of commonality of the "-do" across styles but that's due to ...


2

One way to view mental illness is through the mental model of Buddhism and Daoism. This mental model is the basis for meditation in taekwondo (See here and here), as well as karate, Shaolin gongfu, Muay Thai, taiji, bagua, and xingyi. In the Buddhist and Daoist view, the mind comprises two distinct components: emotional mind - produces emotions such as ...


2

Many good answers here - I would add that for many, like myself, martial arts practice is a way of life - a 'practice'. It's practical and exhilarating to learn actual fighting techniques and to practice sparring. But I've found that after 35 years of martial arts training in various styles, that it's the basic exercises that help most - these thousands or ...


2

Encouraging students NOT to commit suicide is one of the central aspects of Shorinji Kempo, The martial art I practice. This is in deliberate contrast to the older ideals (based on the idea if not the culture of the samurai) that were very much part of the Japanese society at the time of the second world war. You often hear practitioners of karate or judo ...


2

TL;DR - Martial arts organizations are generally a form of quality control that will rarely, if ever, interfere with your learning experience outside of a few specific occasions such as grading for higher ranks and establishing competitive rules. I'd like to start with the last part of your question : Wouldn't it be perfectly valid to be able to practice ...


2

Depends on the instructor. I've encountered instructors who promote people way too quickly. When I was looking for an instructor to train with in college, I encountered a school that would routinely promote people to black belts in tae kwon do within two years. (I ended up not training with them). With that said, if I'm understanding your question correctly, ...


1

Ultimately, it should be your choice. Listen, but make your own decision While your instructor can certainly tell you what they believe to be the best course of action, it is ultimately always your decision whether you want to test for promotion. I have personally declined to test for promotion a few times, both in Tae Kwan Do and in Capoeira. I'll admit ...


1

As a really basic overview: Both Yi I and Yi Hwang studied/followed the teachings of the Chinese Philosopher Zhu Xi They differed slightly in their beliefs around the interaction of Chi and Li. (spellings differ from Chinese to Korean and then to English) Yi Hwang set up a school and academy of Confucianism Yi I wrote many highly regarded literary works ...


1

In almost two decades of doing various martial arts from Karate to Capoeira to Escrima, I have had exactly one time when the subject of suicide was brought up and that was more of a general statement on how bullying was bad and how the instructor was available to talk to if we were experiencing bullying at school after a student at the Chun Kuk Do studio I ...


1

Those things are important, but they are secondary to Karate's (and any other martial art's) purpose: learning how to be a good fighter. All these other things are aspects you need to study to be a good fighter. But the goal is and always will be: how to be better at punching and getting punched than the other guy. If you lose focus on the primary goal, you ...


1

What might be the most optimal martial arts to improve level of focus? Any technical martial art (TKD, muay thai, judo, etc) in which the details of how a movement is performed are important. When working up a skill you would focus on improving a particular aspect of performing the movement, reflect on how well you are progressing, and consider new ...


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