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8

That's barely a modification of kesagatame. There's no gi, so he uses a slightly different grip. It totally counts. Just about all techniques, including pins, are modified in actual application. This is so true that the examples of throws that don't look obviously modified are shared as highlights and widely touted as beautiful paragons of the art. But a ...


7

Yes, the above technique would be a pin in competition judo. A pin in competition judo does not need to be a standard pin; it needs to meet the definition of a pin under the referee rules. This is good especially because judo people can get very nitpicky about what exactly constitutes a particular pin [more on that later]. If your opponent taps at any time ...


6

Yes, arm triangles are legal provided you trap one of uke's arms with their head. According to the IJF Refereeing Seminar 2018: An action like kata-sankaku (sankaku done with the arms) is allowed in a newaza situation. Here are some examples of its use in international competition: World U21 Championships 2015 (Jorre Verstraeten) Jigoro Kano Cup Tokyo ...


5

Unconventional osaekomi-waza Most legally scoring pins come under one of the 10 osaekomi-waza classifications. However, I have seen a couple of unconventional pins which as far as I am aware do not come under any of these labels: "Inverted kesa-gatame" This is a technique favoured by Matsumoto Kaori and Funakubo Haruka, used to success a number of times: ...


5

When translating foreign technique names, sometimes there isn't a perfect analogue in the target language e.g. "tomoe" in tomoe-nage translated as 'circle'. The "kesa" (袈裟) in kesa-gatame in fact refers to a type of buddhist robe, the Kāṣāya. While historically it was worn covering both shoulders, in current Japanese Buddhist style it is wrapped across the ...


4

Yes, there are other constriction techniques. These are a few examples, not meant to be exhaustive. As a philosophical matter, I think you should always be looking to further break uke's structure and constrict their movement and breathing; this is maximum efficiency. yoko shiho gatame: Tori is on the side with extended legs, one arm around the head, and ...


4

I do not know exactly what "crucifix" means to you, but will try to explain how I have seen this term used and how your examples relate. Judo rule change My understanding of the rule change you have illustrated is: The left position was a pin before, and is a pin now (ushiro kesa gatame). The right position was not a pin before, but is a pin now (ura ...


4

As of when, this can be found here: April 1st, 2017 (and it's not been an April's fool!): The Kodokan has used official technique names consisting of 67 Nage-waza and 29 Katame-waza in the past. After giving further consideration, two techniques of Nage-waza, Obi-tori-gaeshi (Te-waza) and Kouchi-maki-komi (Yoko-sutemi-waza), and three Osaekomi ...


3

The IJF criteria for osaekomi-waza are thus (emphasis mine): The referee shall announce osaekomi for an applied technique when the contestant being held is controlled from every direction (from the side, rear or on top) by his opponent and must have his full back or complete upper back (scapular region) in contact with the tatami. The contestant ...


3

Reasons for changes To expand on Philip's answer, the Japanese report from the Kodokan states the change is in response to the increased prevalence of these techniques in the previous 3 years: 平成26(2014)年から多彩化を続ける技術に対応するため、講道館技研究部で、技名称の再検討を行ってきた。 In order to respond to the ever-diversifying techniques from 2014, the Kodokan's Waza Research ...


3

I am only a low-level referee, but here is my best interpretation of the rules for this choke. I would call this version legal. Although uke's left arm is separated from uke's head, tori has control of uke's left shoulder and arm, either with an overhook or underhook grip. I would call this version illegal. This version actively isolates pressure only on ...


2

Kodokan uki-gatame: "S-mount" Kano's Judo Zakki (c.1888) makes reference to there being two variants of uki-gatame (浮固). These are described in the Kodokan New Japanese-English Dictionary of Judo: uki gatame (floating hold) A hold down. When your supine opponent attempts to prevent your juji-gatame (cross armlock) by locking his arms together, remove ...


2

kesa-gatame any hold where tori holds uke diagonally controlling their head and one arm, facing uke's head kuzure-kesa-gatame any variant of kesa-gatame where the hold is under both arms, not diagonally across the shoulder and under one arm makura-kesa-gatame: ushiro-kesa-gatame any variant of kesa-gatame where you are facing the direction of ...


2

Just to add to mattm's answer - the IJF has now codified its position in the current ruleset: So in short, the following submissions are/aren't legal: ✅ Anaconda ✅ Kata-gatame ✅ D'arce / Ungvari / Japanese necktie ❌ Peruvian necktie ❌ Standing arm triangles


2

Uki gatame is a Kodokan-classified pin that is neither a shiho nor a kesa type hold. This pin is most common from the position where tori is attempting ude-hishigi-juji-gatame with both legs over uke and decides to change from the arm lock to a pin. Personally, I would also argue that pins from a sankaku position are also not shiho holds, but the Kodokan ...


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