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17

Many small grapplers have found success fighting bigger opponents. Lightweight Leandro Lo won the Brazilian open-weight nationals. Marcelo Garcia went on a tear in ADCC and Worlds for several years in the aughts against bigger, stronger opponents. Caio Terra is another tiny fighter who fights in absolute divisions. Massive skill advantage can overcome size. ...


16

A Cheap, but Scientific Solution This can be done cheaply (and reasonably accurately) with a smartphone, your fists, and some physics (which can be streamlined in excel or other spreadsheet). You want numbers to accompany your punches, so with a little effort, you can become intimate with character of your punches. I'm pretty sure every smartphone has an ...


8

There is no such thing as force generation without muscles. All animals use muscles to pull tendons which connect to joints. That causes the joints to move in a given direction, which causes limbs to move. What you may mean is that Systema might use "internal mechanics" in a similar manner that other "internal" styles such as T'ai Chi, Bagua, and Xing-Yi ...


7

From a physics perspective, one way to think about striking is impulse: To have an effective strike, you want to: Maximize mass. The normal advice is use your whole body to strike. This means that you do not want to punch simply by using your arm. Most styles deliver more mass behind a strike by rotating the hips. You can also step while striking. It helps ...


6

"Jin" means a trained force, somewhat like a force vector. "Fa" is to attack. In a more practical sense, fajin is a pronounced force that involves the whole body shaking and adding to the power. On a more titillating level, fa jin implies that the body relaxes to produce this burst of force. And it's true. So look for a way to store force and then ...


6

In the context of taijiquan it means power released suddenly from a correctly positioned body in the correct state of relaxation (song). The problem is that each of these steps above has to be explained. I'd rather point you at a blog post by Mike Sigman on fa jing as there are back-references there to other material. A common first step once you have ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


6

First, let's cover some basic context. Coordination of muscle is key It helps to have muscle, but... the real key is coordinating your muscles to work together to generate power. It's the same reason power lifters, who can undeniably lift and move great weight, don't make good baseball pitchers - the pitcher's ability is about coordination to generate ...


5

Yes, power training will positively affect your grappling. It's important to understand how. All techniques require a degree of physicality. (Muscle is, after all, what moves your body in the first place.) Physicality includes strength (the ability to produce force), power (strength applied quickly), conditioning, and other attributes like balance, agility, ...


5

Every muscle in your body pulls and they only pull. They only generate force while contracting and it's the only way your body can generate force. In order for your body to function, every muscle must also have one or more other muscles pulling in direct opposition and under normal usage the muscles are constantly straining against each other while ...


5

It's generally very difficult to measure the force very meaningfully, i.e. in some way that would let you compare different techniques, variations in timing/body-mechanics that you're aware of, even the same technique delivered by different people, or to predict the effect of the technique on different targets. To understand why, it may help to consider ...


5

The kiai, kihap, or "shout" serves many different purposes. It can help provide focus by association (you shout when you strike in practice, so shouting in combat helps you land that prototype strike). It can help provide power (I don't know the mechanism exactly, but shouting or grunting often helps people exert more effort, something to do with ...


4

@Wudang tried to explain it from the point of view of a taijiquan practitioner, but in my mind, he mostly just glossed over the description of fajing and of how to get it working. The term fajin is composed of two words fa, which means "to send out, to issue" and jin is a word used for strength (quite interestingly, one of the pinyin translations I found ...


4

Power in your punches comes from; muscle to generate force, correct shifting of weight/movement, and coordination and technique to get the most of that (alignment of structure, correct angle of attack, timing, etc.). If you want more muscle to generate force, you need to do some kind of resistance training - that can be weights, it could be resistance ...


4

The trick is to move inside their range. Then it's a case of the bigger opponent having to fend off the smaller one because you're no longer in their striking range. Bruce Lee was a short fellow, and he used a combination of parries to move into range, then do things like backfist, rutts, uppercuts, tight hooks, overhead hook to get the job done. in ...


4

Yes, obviously size matters for martial arts. Success in martial arts is a combination of speed, strength, skill, technique, bravery, etc. If you are smaller, you have to make up for being smaller with other factors. Part of this is that small people need to adopt fighting strategies that may be different from big people. Your martial art studies should be ...


4

Size does matter, but only if you play to their strengths and not yours. A 6'+ will have reach on you, yes, but will be at a significant disadvantage when it comes to a low center of gravity and when you are well inside their reach. You can throw them much easier than they can throw you. Also, knowing that they have the reach may make them overconfident ...


4

I use this the EVERLAST PIQ TRAINER It measures power in G-forces, speed in km/h and is quite accurate (I've let various students try it) It's a good activity tracker for punches as it can differentiate hook, jabs and crosses. I find this tracker improved my speed and power in the long run. Please avoid the arcade boxing machine, it damages your hand.


4

`In 1950´s T. Hettinger and E. Muller (1953, 1955) established that a daily effort of 2/3 maximum, for a period of six seconds, would increase strength by approximately 5% per week. One reason for such improvements is the enhanced activation of motor units during an isometric muscle action. One can recruit almost all motor units during a maximal ...


4

For the sake of answering, I'm going to assume you're asking "When is the best time to kiai in order to maximize effect?" Leaving aside any psychological benefit, the physiological effect of kiaiing is to tense the diaphragm and firm up the connection between the upper and lower body. Simply put, if there's "wiggle" in your core, a punch ...


3

In my meager boxing experience, I've been taught to assiduously avoid cocking back before a strike. It telegraphs your intentions. The power that it provides would be better developed through better body mechanics in the hips and legs. However, if you throw a technique that loads you up towards the right rear, such as a right round kick or a left straight ...


3

I like Dave Leipmann's response where he makes it clear that you improve with both skill and power / strength training. You combine both for the best overall effect. One of the comments I often hear in BJJ circles is that women often learn better / faster than men, because they don't have the muscle strength that men do. And so they will stop and try to ...


3

發 and 勁 Transliterated Fa-jin is two characters: Fa/發 - "to send out; to show (one's feeling); to issue; to develop; classifier for gunshots (rounds)" Jin/勁 - "stalwart; sturdy; strong; powerful; strength; energy; enthusiasm; spirit; mood; expression; interest" In the context of martial arts, a fair translation of fa-jin would be "emitting force" or ...


3

Weight training can be beneficial, and some martial arts have a set of supplementary exercises (in Okinawa Goju Ryu we call it Hojo Undo) where you use tools like Chi'ishi (stone on a stick), Ishi-sashi (stone handles - ancient type of Kettle bell) and Nigiri Gamen (a couple of vases with necks in a size to fit a palm) for weight training. The advantage of ...


3

Is there anything I can do to increase the power of my turning kick? Make sure you have the full rotation. For a roundhouse, your standing foot should be close to 90 degrees at the end of the kick. You can check this by going up against a wall and extending your leg out to kick (using wall to balance as needed). When it reaches the full extension, check to ...


3

Expect disagreement about both ideas of how to generate power and in explanations, because every style has its own theories about how to best generate power. The training for how to generate power for particular techniques may also be beyond the average person, as in stretching required for head kicks, for example. Also remember that the maximal or most ...


3

There are two schools of thought based on two distinct principles as to how to generate a punch with maximum effectiveness. In schools similar to karate the force comes from pushing after you connect with the target. Someone punching in this manner will train to strengthen their muscles in order to apply more force. These punches have reletively short ...


3

Your size and strength is relative. Skill level matters more, or the ability to acquire the skill and the skill of the opponent. Check out this you tube channel here , this guy is really good at explaining the concept of energy and power and it can be applied to multiple martial arts. Ultimately, its better to know a few techniques very well, instead of ...


3

I've had the opportunity to work out with Vasiliev and Ryabko about a decade. I've since retired, not for lack of satisfaction, but was sidelined by a skiing injury, after which I focused more on career and family. WRT psychic energy, as explained to me (and I was practicing during the time that video was made in Toronto), it's pretty much anything that ...


3

The proper power association in punches is not just a leg muscle, but the pivoting of the body behind the punch. This being the case depending on which side you are using most of the leg muscles are utilized, but the leg muscles themselves aren't the powerhouse, but the pivot torque power is what contributes to the force of the punch. That being said if ...


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