48

First, each art and instructor is going to approach this differently. Most everyone that I've trained with over the years has, at least somewhat, agreed that aliveness is a vital component. Unfortunately, there's no way to truly prepare; at its worst, we still always know that our training partners are not going to kill us. Part of the mental preparation ...


32

What you're really asking for is insight into the strengths and weaknesses of Aikido pertaining to self-defense scenarios. Aikido uses a small number of throws, joint locks, submissions, and strikes. There are some holds and submissions done from the ground. A number of breakfalls are trained. There is some weapons training as well, notably the 4-foot Jo ...


29

Yes, martial arts could help you, just as any diversion that you enjoy could help you. Martial arts does help with focus, clarity, peace of mind, body improvement, a whole host of things, but so do many many other activities, both physical and non. I would not suggest a specific style, but spend a few months going around to different studios of different ...


19

Rory Miller has written a few books that talk about this topic extensive and provide a variety of drills focused around the mental aspects of self defense, specifically: Facing Violence: Preparing for the Unexpected Drills: Training for Sudden Violence In Facing Violence he talks about the various stages of escalation in the real world and what, your ...


15

Have you considered an MMA ground and pound dummy or a wrestling throw dummy? There are several types out there and not all of the work. I would consider looking for one with full length arms and is sturdy enough to nearly stand on it's own. Some examples: Throw Dummy: Ground and Pound: Personally I think the throw dummy would work better than the ...


14

Traditional the three most important things in Real Estate are 1) location 2) location 3) location. In martial arts, the three most important things are: 1) Sensei 2) Sensei 3) Sensei 4) Dojo. (or Sifu, if you're inclined that way) I'm coming late to this question and I think the others have provided very valuable comments, but one thing I saw missing was ...


13

Generally, no This is generally not true - there are many defensive arts where you improve your fighting skills right away and reach a basic proficiency within a matter of a few weeks or months at most (skill wise, at least, fitness can take longer to produce). Many weapon based arts that are close to their original use also have this same thing - if you ...


12

One of my instructors used to say that martial arts is only good if you know you are going to be in a fight. If you are attacked unexpectedly what will likely happen is you will have a natural instinctive reaction (fight or flight, flinch response). This is because you weren't in the mental mindset of expecting a confrontation (as you would be in a class or ...


12

No absolute measure I do not think an absolute measure can be determined as the skill, training, and physical differences between participants in addition to local environmental factors would make any measure meaningless. However, I have a few ideas… Woolly Measures If those were more woolly, they would baa… Simplicity The martial art needs to be ...


11

I suspect that what you are seeing in martial arts movies is more of a cultural artifact than anything: A representation of what that culture considers valuable, as opposed to a representation of an absolute association. In capoeira music is played for (strongly) cultural reasons as a way of setting the style and the energy of the game, but not because it ...


11

What I suggest is: Find a good dojo. The dojo will be more important than the art and its location will help greatly. Closer to home would make it easier on the way back, closer to work would make it easier on the way in. Since you want this to gain peace of mind, maybe a dojo that has some meditation would help. Maybe you just need an intense physical ...


11

Yes At least, it worked out very well for me. I am in a high-stress, rack-em-and-stack-em IT job. When I started my current run of martial arts training seriously about ten years ago, the constant context switching and demands of my job were making me distracted, short-tempered, and less happy than I wanted to be. Finding a hobby that was very different ...


11

Okay well if you do wing chun that is great, so do i! Yes it is definitely worth practicing alone. Here are some of the things i do: Get a 3 section wall bag and a wet towel (with somewhere to hang it). Assuming you have correct form on your sun fist punch, you should practice punching the center of a wet towel with out any water flicking back onto you. And ...


11

Practice on your own is pretty much an unavoidable element of the martial way past a certain point. Other than developing your body through conditioning exercise (Bruce Lee's plyometrics are a good starting point), you can develop your body through breathing exercises (the Systema DVDs about breathing are pretty interesting and insightful). It is important ...


10

Note that this answer generated a lot of debate. This is good, in my opinion, as I hope it prompted people to think about the issues of how we all should react to violence. However, it made the comments really argumentative which is not the purpose of this site. Thus, I have added some of the comments after the section. I believe that the section I added ...


10

What you are asking for is a tall order. If you live on the ground floor, noise issues are more easily addressed because you don't have to worry about impact noises with the floor. Impact noises are the hardest to control, and they radiate through rigid structures like floor joists rather well. I have no affiliation with the site, but there are a great ...


9

Things that I have found help me with specifically wrist locks, but some of which are adaptable to other forms of practice as well. Grab a Partner for an Extra Day This is really the best option, but also logistically the most difficult. Talk to the other students in your class and see if one of the more experienced ones would be willing to add an extra ...


9

Based on your comments above, I would definitely recommend that you start seeking an instructor. If you were looking for pure self-defense, then you could start doing things on your own, like understanding the different types of attacks - a bar aggressor has a very different motive from that of a professional criminal, like a mugger or rapist, so their ...


8

There's a good article called "The truth about violence" by one Sam Harris which explains the necessary mental preparedness nicely, imo. With regard to your question, I'd say the key takeaway is this: This is the core principle of self-defense: Do whatever you can to avoid a physical confrontation, but the moment avoidance fails, attack explosively for ...


8

Disclaimer: I am a beginner in both judo and physical culture. My views on strength, conditioning, and technique should be viewed with skepticism. You're right that training once a week is insufficient. Most people won't see much progress in either physical condition or skills at less than two days a week minimum. I'll address solutions in the context of ...


8

All due respect (there is no nice way to say this) but it seems from your question that you have no clue what you could be getting yourself into. Don't get me wrong, martial arts can help you in a lot of ways. But from the phrasing of your question it seems like you are doing it on a whim, like you were searching for solutions, you rolled the dice and ...


8

Fighting vs. Martial Arts First off, let me approach this from a different direction; what we see in movies and on TV is dance. It's a choreographed series of movements to display an idea of fighting, not actual combative action. The martial arts are codified systems to train a person to fight. In modern times, more spiritual and psychological meaning has ...


8

You should (read: must) not teach children alone. That opens you up for all sorts of bad allegations that could tarnish your name forever and end you on certain registers you cannot get off. There should be at least one (or better two) other adults present in addition to the main instructor at all classes. Usual disclaimer: I am not a lawyer nor do I play ...


7

Fitness for martial arts doesn't mean just strength or aerobic capacity. It also requires flexibility and agility. Please don't ignore stretching--both in order to be better, and also to train safer. Injuries often inhibit, even preclude, eager training. (Said by the guy who's not trained seriously for a month while nursing a shoulder injury.) When I moved ...


7

Short answer: MMA. Long answer follows... What we've learned about martial arts in the past two decades is that what matters most is how you train, not what you train. Style and techniques are unimportant. So long as your training involves sparring against "live" and "non-compliant" partners, the techniques you use and how you use them will be honed to fit ...


7

Yes, with caveats… First and foremost, you do not describe your "bad hip" which could range from a small inconvenience to risk of paralysis if things go wrong. Clearly, speaking to a medical professional is essential here. If they give you the go head, keep reading. Second, you will never compete in the Olympics. So, you need to find a dojo that caters ...


6

A gi and a pole is all you need! I had support beams readily available when I was training in judo. Put your gi on the beam, and you're good to go for a lot of different throws. It works pretty well for uchi komis for throws like o soto gari, o goshi, seio nage, and the like. Not the best for o uchi or ko uchi gari though. To make it a little more ...


6

This is a huge and complicated topic, with active academic research ongoing. I am not an expert; any summary I give will be incomplete. With that said: Everyone's heard of "fight or flight" mode: That's what happens when someone perceives an immediate danger, and has a rush of adrenaline. Those who've been to a psychology class more recently will recall ...


6

I think there is a 'superman' complex that many beginners suffer from. A notion that they are doing well in class maybe won a competition or two. Get to a real fight and the natural instinct to run our be aggressive is lost to trying to figure out whether to throw a punch or a kick. This, along with semi or light contact training can give a false sense of ...


6

Randori of six to nine or more 5-minute rounds without a break sounds just about perfect. One can't get in solid judo shape without hard training like that. Degradation of technique should be examined as its own problem. Are students in poor shape? Are they not training frequently enough to get in good shape? Are students playing too competitively, and so ...


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