26

For all the talk about kinetic linking (like it's something we didn't already know for centuries), the truth is really rather simple: pushups, while good for developing muscle and overall personal health, are really ancillary to the development of raw punching power. Further, the tendency to isolate the arms by maintaining rigidity in the rest of the body ...


17

I feel there's a core issue here being neglected: When I throw a punch, SOMETIMES MY WRIST DOESN'T STAY STRAIGHT and I run the risk of spraining it. If I could highlight, underline, and make it flash, I would. Your issue here is not simply wrist strength (which, by the way, is not going to be corrected by simple strength training alone), but rather your ...


15

A Cheap, but Scientific Solution This can be done cheaply (and reasonably accurately) with a smartphone, your fists, and some physics (which can be streamlined in excel or other spreadsheet). You want numbers to accompany your punches, so with a little effort, you can become intimate with character of your punches. I'm pretty sure every smartphone has an ...


11

I have done some Wing Chun; I do love the vertical punch - it's very fast, powerful and precise The vertical punch is the most basic and fundamental in Wing Chun and is usually thrown with the elbow down and in front of the body. Wing Chun favors the vertical punch for several reasons: Directness. The punch is not "loaded" by pulling the elbow behind the ...


11

Heavyweight fighters are more susceptible to knock-outs. It's why heavyweight fights sell better than lightweight fights. Fans want to see a knock-out. Heavyweights generally hit harder than lightweights, because they have more muscle and more mass behind their punches than lightweight fighters do. When they're being punched at, heavyweights are slower to ...


10

Adrenaline is a game changer. The football analogy can be good. You're playing a friendly game, or a training. You won't feel the need to win. For sure, you practice, it's important to feel the stress a little, but in a competitive case, the stress brings a lot of adrenaline which makes you much more reactive to what's happening. The fact that you feel hits ...


10

None of what you described typically causes death. They can cause serious injuries, but rarely death. It's not possible for a palm strike to the nose to break off the bone and drive it into the brain. That's a complete myth. There's no truth to it whatsoever. If anything, the bone will shatter into bits or will break in two. It won't get driven back towards ...


10

Well, to start off, punching someone in the head is potentially harmful to the puncher. Skulls are made out of hard bone with few flat surfaces and several angles, which increases the risk of breaking your knuckles on contact. And that's if you're lucky enough to not make contact with something like the teeth, and also suffer additional lacerations. Frankly, ...


9

When developing any technique, there are pairs of muscles that must work together. In the case of punching, and this kind of a punch, your recoil from the punch is just as important for absorbing the impact as the actual delivery itself. To practice the punch, start with the technique in open space and focus on delivering the energy of the punch to the ...


9

Some of the comments to that youtube video correctly point out that the example of straight punching given in the video is not actually Wing Chun. If you take a look at a number of other Wing Chun videos you will see that not only is the punch delivered very differently, but also that Wing Chun practitioners will deliver a mix of punches, chops and open ...


9

A knockout occurs when the brain bounces around the braincase. This movement causes injury which will lead to unconsciousness. In order to have a high chance of knocking the person out, the best place to target is the chin. This is both a relatively soft target, compared to other parts of the skull, and is relatively easy to get to. Impact there creates a ...


9

I just love those self defence myths. First, unless you have trained punching people with keys in between your fingers, the result will be as much (if not more) damage to yourself as with the target. You may drop your keys as a result of the impact and pain which means that you lost your keys. Punch Injuries: Insights into Intentional Closed Fist Injuries ...


9

The subject of "puncher vs. kicker vs. wrestler" comes up a lot in martial arts. The general philosophy that's put forward is: "Don't box a boxer. Don't kick a kicker. Don't wrestle a wrestler." The idea is that you don't want to fight someone on their terms. You need to take them out of their element, where they have no training and therefore become lost ...


8

This question about vertical-fist punching might help you. I'd say that keeping the fist vertical for a "jab or "cross" makes it an entirely different punch with a dubious connection to boxing or MMA. As for this specific situation, I think the salient point is that a fellow student of unknown expertise is giving you advice that contradicts your instructor'...


8

As an instructor of Krav maga and Israeli Combat Systems (ICS), I can tell you there are very specific reasons for not turning at the end of a punch. Krav Maga and ICS are meant to teach people quickly and effectively defend themselves in a street fight. Unlike a tournament or cage fight, anytime you get into a street fight, your skills will deteriorate ...


8

Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


8

My first piece of advice is to see a doctor. If you are suffering something other than a concussion, that's important to know. However, if you are suffering concussions, you are risking your health in a serious way, and that's even more important to know. Concussions ARE brain damage All the current science points to the fact that concussions produce ...


7

Some techniques and training do not stress the joints, others do. It depends on the martial art, the teacher and the kind of training. For example, a lot of judoka end up with bad knees. Likewise a lot of capoeira folks end up with back injuries. Joint damage can be understood in 3 factors: Too much stress, bad applied If you try to do too much force ...


7

In my experience they are both a reverse punch, or gyaku zuki, which is done on the same side as the rearward leg and is one of the most basic foundation techniques taught in traditional karate styles. You should practice it stepping forwards and backwards, you never know when you are going to need it. In terms of co-ordination it is certainly harder to ...


7

Isshinryu karate emphasizes the use of the vertical fist punch; it is a trademark of the style. Here is my perspective as an ex-Isshinryu practitioner who now (occasionally) trains boxing and muay Thai for striking. Purported Benefits The spiel I gave when I taught Isshinryu was as follows: the vertical fist is part of a rising punch that: fits into the ...


7

Your mileage may vary, but generally, the choice of fist position has more to do with the ergonomics of the punch. The distance and the height of the target and the angle of the punch seem to be the major aspects that contribute to the choice of the fist position. When I punch above the chest height I usually prefer either open palm (I am a taijiquan ...


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


7

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. "...


7

Boxers, kickboxers, and MMA fighters train to be able to minimize the damage caused by a hit to the head. It's actually pretty hard to knock anyone out who has trained for any length of time in these arts. One thing to realize is that you have a natural instinct to flinch whenever you see something coming towards your face. You might still get hit, but the ...


6

There are actually a lot of different pushup variations that can help build the base muscle. Convict Conditioning (ignore the marketing) has an excellent one that goes from wall pushups through a ten-step progression to one-armed pushups, with standards at each level for when you should advance to the next more difficult pushup variety. There are also ...


6

If you are finding them hard from a plank position, do them from your knees. The plank is a good one to re-enforce your core which you will use when you punch. Pull ups and chin ups will help as well. A pull up bar can help you do push up and dips, plus they are not that expensive. Make sure you do triceps and biceps as well -- do not do just one. Note ...


6

There are a few things you can do: Knuckle pushups Fingertip pushups Kettlebell presses Heavy bag work The knuckle pushups have the following benefits: strengthens the fist, strengthens the forearm muscles. But they also have some drawbacks: rough on your knuckles, overdoing it can induce joint pain. Fingertip pushups also strengthen the forearm muscles, ...


6

What is precision? There's a misconception about what it means to be precise, so to illustrate, let's examine two options: OPT1: A direct punch going straight out. OPT2: A punch that follows the target. If we attempt to strike a given moving target, it is the natural inclination to want to follow the target (OPT2) as we strike. This extends the length of ...


6

Yes, you have a high risk of getting your nose broken at some stage if you continue with Muay Thai. It isn't Tiddly Winks* - you will eventually get an injury, not just from landed punches but also from kicks. If you are at all attached to your nose (pun intended) then reconsider Muay Thai. Personally I've had my nose broken half a dozen times or more - ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


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