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49

Studies Where We Choked People Unconscious In a Lab Being choked unconscious might not be good. (And we must keep in mind the vast difference between being "choked out" to the point of tapping and being choked unconscious.) But we have very little evidence that shows that it's bad to any significant degree, and considerable evidence that being choked all ...


17

In my experience as a male trainer and trainee the key for a hard, educational or maybe painful training is trust between all parts of the training group. Female fighters have told me that they were beaten up in training after they told their opponent to slow down. Afterwards they felt violently abused. So in such a case the trainer has the responsibility ...


13

As a former LAPD police man who went through academy training in the early 70s, I can give testimony about the bar arm control hold and its effects, on other police cadets and myself as well. We were taught to know what to do when gaining consciousness, how to identify by hearing, where our main threat was (man with a gun) and how to proceed. Naturally in ...


13

First and foremost: do not take medical advice from strangers on the Internet! Go and seek professional medical help. Secondly, from your (very limited) exposition, this clubs seems to encourage bullying and has a clear disregard for basic safety. I would strongly suggest you do not train with them. Finally, you can condition your body to disregard pain. ...


11

Accidents happen. However, when you have an accident with people you are not really trying to hurt - you make extra effort to make sure the accident doesn't happen again - otherwise it is not an accident. If someone's ego at losing in sparring causes them to attempt to really injure someone, that is not a safe person to work with. Consider what you are ...


10

I've trained in many martial arts schools. There have always been one or two individuals that didn't know their own strength or who simply had some kind of mental issue that caused them to scare everyone else in the class who had the misfortune of partnering up with them. And I'm not even talking about sparring. It could be a nice, smooth, flowing, ...


9

Thicker doesn't equal better. It's more about the quality. Judo mats need to be different then TKD or Karate or even wrestling mats. You should be looking for mats designed for judo. Dax, Swain, and Zebra are all reputable brands that make excellent tatami. things to look for: texture on the tatami (should be the rice grain pattern, this ...


9

Hi have a trained a couple of ladies over the years and here is my take on it. For starters, there is a difference between training hard and just getting beat up. While I believe that is very important that you treat a women the same way you treat a man it is also important to not discourage a women from training. First - As a women you should be aware ...


9

But, when training, you can stop and breathe. But there's no time to breathe in a real fight. This difference does not have to exist. A coach should occasionally put students through sparring of some kind that the student should not take breaks in. That can take many forms, including hard rounds with someone else from the gym, or a smoker match-up with ...


9

Practicing on a mat is not sufficient. If you do not progress to harder materials you will not have the feedback benefit harder surfaces provide. You might think you're doing well because it's (relatively) comfortable. The phrase "safely fall" is nebulous. Will practicing breakfalls on forgiving surfaces transfer to concrete? Of course--you're learning how ...


8

In general yes, it's better to start out with a light weapon as you have to learn the forms and techniques first, without being concerned about injuring yourself with a heavy or real weapon. Usually you would learn the techniques with a wooden version of the weapon while at the same time learning how to strengthen the arms, wrist and fingers in style and ...


8

After getting my nose broken I had perpetual nose bleeds for about a month, I usually had about one each day that would just spring up randomly. My brother was training to be a paramedic at the time, so he knew how to deal with it and taught me. Presumably as it was from his paramedic training, it's well researched. 1: Look down, not up. You don't want the ...


8

Quite frankly, it sounds like you're in an abusive training environment. The language you're using is uncomfortably similar to what I might hear from someone being beaten up by their spouse, the "they only hurt me badly when I'm doing things wrong" and making excuses for their behavior. It is possible that you're in a situation where you're literally out of ...


8

I'm sure with your jujitsu you've seen enough of how a dojo should be to judge when someone's acting improperly, though from the little you've detailed it's not clear whether he's potentially just socially inept (trying to offer encouragement or some sense of empathy with the difficulties of stretching as an adult), and junior enough in the martial arts to ...


7

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


7

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. "...


7

Based on your age, there is no reason why you cannot. It won't happen for everyone, but if you did them at an earlier age then you should be able to do them again. But make no mistake, it is going to take some sustained and regular training to achieve it, and if you stop stretching once you've achieved the splits then you will gradually lose your flexibility ...


7

Leg-locks were banned shortly after an 1899 exhibition match in Kyoto (held before Emperor Taishō) between Kodokan 3rd dan Yuji Hirooka and Fusen-ryū master Mataemon Tanabe. During the match Tanabe performed a throw and subsequently applied a leg-lock, breaking Hirooka's leg. At the next meeting of the Butoku Kai that year, Kano proposed banning leg-locks ...


7

No, falling on concrete is not necessary, provided you train with mats as a safety mechanism and you do not rely on mats to protect you from unrealistic techniques. Use mats for extra safety for techniques that work without mats Mats provide an extra margin of error while you are learning but should not be used to protect you from bad technique. When you ...


6

Firstly, there is no minimum for injury prevention - but the thicker the rubber, the better the protection. Too thick and it will feel spongy, so while a thick rubber might be suitable for a martial art that incorporates a lot of throws, you might want a thinner one for disciplines which require jumps and rapid changes of direction. The karate and TKD clubs ...


6

This is going to be something of a trial and error method for you, I think. You're going to have to try a bunch of things and go with what works the best or sucks the least. First of all, if your instructor outright bans shoes, that's one thing. If your instructor says no shoes "because" of some reason, then you have a little wriggle room. In that case, see ...


6

I've actually learned more (in longsword) from a heavier weapon than I have from a lighter weapon. The key with longsword is to learn how to use the handle as a lever, and nothing teaches that like weight. It's very easy to tell when you're brute forcing a cut, as opposed to levering it with weight. Using a light sword, it's possible to do things that ...


6

If you are not a trained first aider, then I strongly suggest you did a course as soon as possible. As David Liepmann said, the recovery position is generally safe. However, if you are not a trained first aider, you might miss either something or do the wrong thing or exacerbate things that will lead to the victim dying. I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one ...


6

For mat size, I am listing the official competition mat sizes as a reference to help you assess the difference between practicing throws and takedowns and practicing ground techniques: keep in mind that these are large competition areas meant to minimize out-of-bound stoppages and injury risks, and they are a reasonable upper bound for a mat used by two ...


6

You can't reliably get good at things you don't practice. In a fight, we don't rise to the level of our expectations. Rather, we fall to the level of our training. Whether it's an eye-poke, strike to the carotid sinus, a chin-push osotogari, or some other dangerous technique, if you never train it against a resisting opponent (that is, in sparring), you ...


6

Your instructor should have noticed this and be taking steps to mitigate his aggression and lack of respect. Respect is a cornerstone of the martial arts. Not everyone has it and not everyone learns it, so you will invariably encounter people of this nature. It is especially prevalent in lower grades - usually respect is learned (and gained) the longer ...


5

The founder of judo, Jigoro Kano, recognized this trade-off between "deadly" or severely damaging techniques and our ability to practice these techniques to a useful degree. The situation has improved with technology. Today we have good goggles, MMA and boxing gloves, and steel cups, so if we want to train out ball punches, nukites to the eye, striking, ...


5

It is definitely best to start with a light weapon at slow speed. You must give your body time to adjust to different movements and you must give your brain time to adjust to different techniques. When using a light weapon you are able to cheat (using improper techniques) so by going slow you provide yourself with the time to make conscious choices about ...


5

I feel that pretty much anybody can enter into competition, and learn from it. If a judoka knows how to fall safely, knows at least one throw and one hold down, there is no reason they cannot compete. Of course any coach has an obligation to be open with their students and if you feel someone should not compete inform them on why, and how they can get to ...


5

Several sports aside boxing and martial arts (such as soccer, rugby, ice hockey) have the potential to cause damage. So, the risks are real and clear (for example: Kickboxing sport as a new cause of traumatic brain injury-mediated hypopituitarism), as they are for any sports that allows contact. That said, how severe the risk is? This is a difficult ...


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