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Stances Like squats or push-ups, stance training is often not directly about fighting, but in acquiring strength, flexibility, and coordination. Acrobatics Modern wushu is closer to gymnastics, a display of athleticism and not really for fighting. Large flashy movements have always been crowd-pleasers with questionable fighting utility. Kung fu is a rather ...


14

I don't think it's possible to give an answer to such a broad question, other than to say something along the lines of It can be, to the extent that... It trains on realistic, damage-inflicting strikes, with "realistic" indicating targeting realistic targets (e.g., knife hands to the neck are not open if the guy has his guard up), and not many (if ...


4

Welcome, Mike. It is NOT 'being a baby' to ask for help in your situation. Being victimised in this way can be a horrible, distressing experience. You don't deserve to be going through it. You need help, and the smartest thing for you to do is to seek help. There is absolutely no shame in this. You don't have to answer the following questions, but if you do, ...


3

Knowing kung fu is one thing, applying it is something else. You have to recognise what to do when you are being attacked. There is no standard kung-fu: there are lots of different types that are all grouped together and called kung fu. There is no standards body for kung fu. The purpose of a stance is for stability in a particular situation. The teacher ...


3

I agree with Futilitarian that a good leg position is the 45-degree stance, which gives you the best range of options for footwork and moving the upper torso. For the hands, I would actually recommend raising the hands to about shoulder height, halfway between extended and touching the shoulders, palms out. It's not a very aggressive positioning, more of a &...


3

Without having more information about the specific circumstances, and your type/level of training to date: A classic 45 degree shoulder-width stance (weight distributed evenly upon the balls of your feet, rear foot turned out at 45 degrees) provides you with options. Retreat, pivot, attack, side-step; all can be accomplished to a fair degree from this basic ...


3

It seems that this guy is using you as a wooden dummy and that he does not intend to hurt you (given the information that you are still able to type after recieving 100's of punches and kicks from him). With this in mind, you can try to fight back as fast and as hard as possible. The essential thing would be not to lose confidence so that you can continue on ...


2

A number of broad strategies/techniques are outlined below. Techniques specific to various attacks are numerous, due to the many, many ways in which such a confrontation might unfold. A Google/Youtube search will provide you with a lot of useful technique-specific information, and of course a lot of suspect information as well. If you find some information ...


2

Yes, but: Kung Fu is an umbrella term for all Chinese martial arts. There's hundreds of them and many are very different from each other. Whether or not a historical martial art is practical for self-defence depends more on how it is trained than on its techniques. Yes, the techniques need to be practical on a basic level, but most martial arts are ...


1

So assuming both fighters are healthy, adult human beings with no bone diseases and no other outside factors are involved. You aren’t breaking your arm this way. It may not be completely impossible, as stranger things have happened, but it would literally be a freak accident if it happened. When blocking a hook punch, the idea is to position your forearm so ...


1

I can see a number of reasons why you might choose to train with a poorly weighted/balanced/constructed swords. Cost - If all you can afford is a poor quality cheap sword, this is still a superior option to not training at all. Novelty - There is some value in training slightly differently to how you normally would, as it will give you some insight into ...


1

The training I was getting was divided in three parts: Traditional Acrobatics Utility Acrobatics were useless in a fight, but built strength and elasticity of the body. That's something you always want to have in a fight. I dropped that part because frankly I was too fat and too old for this. Traditional was flashy, sure, but I was able to kick old rusty ...


1

Having been to two different traditional Kung Fu schools, I'll say that an average person would not want to get into a fight with any of the more advanced students or masters, at least that I have met. So in a nutshell, the answer to the question "Is (training) Kung-Fu useful for self defence?" the answer is "Yes" if the alternative is ...


1

Oh this is my bread and butter. So let’s get the big generalizations out of the way first. Without stepping, kicks with the back leg will hit harder. Kicks with the front leg will be faster. Kicks with the back leg have more reach. Now, I use kicks a lot, and I mean a whole lot, and what I’ve learned is that context and situation matter a whole lot when it ...


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