15

Stances Like squats or push-ups, stance training is often not directly about fighting, but in acquiring strength, flexibility, and coordination. Acrobatics Modern wushu is closer to gymnastics, a display of athleticism and not really for fighting. Large flashy movements have always been crowd-pleasers with questionable fighting utility. Kung fu is a rather ...


14

I don't think it's possible to give an answer to such a broad question, other than to say something along the lines of It can be, to the extent that... It trains on realistic, damage-inflicting strikes, with "realistic" indicating targeting realistic targets (e.g., knife hands to the neck are not open if the guy has his guard up), and not many (if ...


6

I have not encountered this strategy in seminars or regular training of Krav Maga. This involved personnel with extensive experience in law enforcement and military training as well as bouncers who actually have been stabbed. Therefore, I would say that it cannot be counted as "relevant strategy" taught in contemporary self-defence as far as my ...


6

You comply with whatever you are being asked to do. You are not going to escape that without being shot but on the other hand you have not been shot yet. That means that your captor wants you alive at least for now. So do what they say and stay alert for a better time to try to escape.


4

Demian Maia, Brazilian jiu-jitsu champion and one of the best exponents of BJJ in MMA, said this after defeating perennial title challenger Chael Sonnen with a lateral drop to triangle choke: “I want to show jiu-jitsu to the world,” Maia said to Joe Rogan as cornerman Wanderlei Silva implored the crowd to cheer, “and show to the people that you can win the ...


4

I attended last year a training defence against weapons. Guns are here restricted, so this it isn't trained often. We started with the course with the use of guns. One had it, the other one closed in, step by step. Not everyone had been in the military. In the training everyone aimed with long arms while the opponent had distance. At one point all took the ...


4

Just wanted to preface this, I've been sparring since around age 6, and all testings require a 1v2 to 1v5 versus the national team members, so please take what I say with a grain of salt. Whenever you're attacked on the street, your first priority should be getting out of there. Most attacks can be random, after provoking some drunk guy, but practice fight ...


4

You can certainly get better without sparring. Your movements will become more fluid, and you’ll have better mechanics than before–by hitting the bag and shadowboxing. However, you’ll be at a disadvantage against someone that’s doing those two things, and sparring since their timing and in-ring intelligence will be sharper than yours. I think ultimately ...


4

Welcome, Mike. It is NOT 'being a baby' to ask for help in your situation. Being victimised in this way can be a horrible, distressing experience. You don't deserve to be going through it. You need help, and the smartest thing for you to do is to seek help. There is absolutely no shame in this. You don't have to answer the following questions, but if you do, ...


3

As someone who's worked in law enforcement and forensic mental health settings, the key element is to get the person on their back as soon as possible. Most deaths in custody/restraint result from positional asphyxia which is far less likely when supine. From here, control of the extremities without pressure on the joints is the safest option, so to control ...


3

Steve's answer raises a bunch of good points which already cover a lot what I would have to say on martial arts as well, so I would like to have this answer to be understood as complementary. About multiple opponents in martial arts Generally, martial arts rarely train multi-opponent situations. Aikido does so on higher levels, but as already said, this is ...


3

The question asks for a detailed analysis of Taiji as it compares and contrasts with other martial arts. Looking beyond the specifics, there's an underlying question here about how Taiji is different from other martial arts. If we understand that, maybe it will help answer the specific questions. The first thing to realize about Taiji is that it's an "...


3

Overall Sinking of the joints is one of the core techniques, and a method of directing/re-directing force. It allows directing force even in unexpected directions. Sinking of the joints (wrists, elbows, knees, hips) makes it difficult for an opponent to lock you. "Emptying" is another pillar, and is used both to mitigate impact of strikes, and ...


3

The highest priority for self-defense is strength & conditioning. This is 10x more true if you do not have a training partner. Ideal S&C techniques for limited training time would include deadlifts, chin-ups, barbell squats, overhead press, distance running (by distance, between 1 mile and 5km; by time, up to an hour at a steady pace or fartleking), ...


3

As far as I am aware, all martial arts systems that teach about the eyes use this practice. This practice corresponds to the use of peripheral vision, as opposed to foveal vision. Foveal vision is more sensitive and allows discernment or color and fine detail in a small area for tasks such as reading, while peripheral vision covers a wide area and ...


3

While it only takes a few seconds to roll the newspaper to make the weapon, it does take time and attention to do so, so you're unlikely to be able to do it on the spot, in a crisis situation. Once rolled up, it has to either have constant pressure put on it to stay in shape, or needs to have some sort of fixative like tape used to keep it in shape, so the ...


3

From a TKD specific position, as it's an Olympic sport, we can look at the studies which have been carried out about it from a sport's performance perspective. The primary test of TKD specific ability is the Frequency Speed of Kick Test, which is carried out over a single 10 second bout, and then repeated 10 second efforts. This was developed by the Spanish ...


3

Your technique may be correct, it may be not perfect. I can't tell you by your question. The hand, wrist etc need conditioning. For the spear hand, make sure the fingers are a unit, otherwise the middle finger takes all the thrust. Normally it can't take it. Align the three fingers will help. To train your wrist you could do push-up on the fist. So very ...


3

Although sparring is one of the most important elements of any fight training program, it is certainly possible to significantly improve certain aspects of your skillset without sparring. Shadow sparring can be utilised in more than one way, to develop: Speed Strategy Technique (inc. footwork, defence, striking etc) Aerobic capacity Muscular endurance Create ...


3

It seems that this guy is using you as a wooden dummy and that he does not intend to hurt you (given the information that you are still able to type after recieving 100's of punches and kicks from him). With this in mind, you can try to fight back as fast and as hard as possible. The essential thing would be not to lose confidence so that you can continue on ...


3

Without having more information about the specific circumstances, and your type/level of training to date: A classic 45 degree shoulder-width stance (weight distributed evenly upon the balls of your feet, rear foot turned out at 45 degrees) provides you with options. Retreat, pivot, attack, side-step; all can be accomplished to a fair degree from this basic ...


3

I agree with Futilitarian that a good leg position is the 45-degree stance, which gives you the best range of options for footwork and moving the upper torso. For the hands, I would actually recommend raising the hands to about shoulder height, halfway between extended and touching the shoulders, palms out. It's not a very aggressive positioning, more of a &...


3

Knowing kung fu is one thing, applying it is something else. You have to recognise what to do when you are being attacked. There is no standard kung-fu: there are lots of different types that are all grouped together and called kung fu. There is no standards body for kung fu. The purpose of a stance is for stability in a particular situation. The teacher ...


2

I've been interested in strategy since early childhood, which led to game theory, which led to AI theory. AI theory is useful in general, and taught me that the best way to think about dimensionality is "degrees of freedom". (Algorithms can think in n-dimensions, 800 dimensions as a example.) One of the lovely things about the "sweet science&...


2

Q: How does competition fighting differ from self-defense? A: The other answers here round out this answer as well. Competition fighting is usually done in a well-controlled environment. The opponents are commonly "fairly" matched by experience and weight, and they are aware that of the intentions of the opposing party. Self-defense relies strongly ...


2

I agree with Macaco's answer. Just wanted to chime in with my own thoughts as well. There are generally five ways to use a nunchuck: For intimidation. Twirling any weapon around is scary to your opponent. Flailing it around. The end of the nunchuck is used to strike your opponent. Using it as a solid stick instead of a flexible weapon. Usually you grab both ...


2

The bagua strategy outline for fighting multiple opponents: Fight standing up. Always move, forwardish. Your back is hardest to defend, and against multiple opponents it is not possible to always face all opponents. Make it more difficult by not presenting a stationary target. Don't expect to be able to stand in one place and turn around without getting hit....


2

A strangle or choke requires pressure on the blood vessels and/or windpipe. Move to reduce, not increase pressure. Pulling away and sitting up will increase pressure. Get your chin underneath the choke, which will relieve the pressure on the blood vessels and windpipe. Push the opponents hands down towards your feet and move your body up towards their head,...


2

Only military and police trainers can likely comment on the utility of such techniques—my guess is that they are not focused on due to the low probability of success, and that strategy with firearms is to fell the opponent from a distance, ideally from cover. However these techniques are a major part of serious contemporary "gun fu" choreography, ...


2

The use of a palm strike does not equate to a loss of strength or speed. A traditional fist may however enable greater effective range if thrown palm-up. Perhaps one disadvantage of a typical half-fist palm strike (fingertips curled to top of palm) is that the increased surface area of the hand requires more room to navigate through an opening, and if the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible