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did a few months of chow gar in London about 20 years ago and it seemed very good, very no-nonsense.


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I'll pretend you're asking "tips for fighting multiple people at once?". 99% of it would be to avoid going to rough bars where something like this would happen; but if you do, recognize the situation and avoid it; or if you can't, apologize and grovel your way out of it; but if you can't, run; but if your avenue of escape is cut off... You have to ...


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Since you mentioned pro boxers, I recommend styles that specialize on kicking. It will prevent boxers from getting in range to fight.


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In real-life fights, your assailant is almost certainly not going to stand back in kickboxing range looking for an opening. I suppose they might just still be posturing, so if you kick first YOU'RE the attacker and subject to criminal prosecution. (And no, the court is not going to take your "He was threatening me" as a reason for you to avoid ...


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I've watched this scene a few more times, and it's very good choreography, representative of the better work over the past few decades. Notice how relaxed Philip is during the grappling—Royce Gracie had a similar looseness, usually used to supreme effect. My guess is they brought in a stunt coordinator or choreographer or consultant with some military ...


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Not unrealistic at all, imho, in that Philip is highly trained fighter. The bite Paige delivers is not determinative. Only pain is inflicted. There is no serious risk of loss of function of limb, nor of death. Sometimes you have to take a hit to prevail, or other types of damage to prevail In a knife fight, I'd trade a wicked gash to my forearm in ...


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From a TKD specific position, as it's an Olympic sport, we can look at the studies which have been carried out about it from a sport's performance perspective. The primary test of TKD specific ability is the Frequency Speed of Kick Test, which is carried out over a single 10 second bout, and then repeated 10 second efforts. This was developed by the Spanish ...


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Here's my issue, the stance and guard for Muay Thai and for boxing. Guarding my ribs is really weird, cause my chest gets in the way of keeping my elbows tucked close to the body. So I have to choose to protect my head and face more than my torso. Getting punched in the breasts sucks, so do kicks and elbows, but I haven't died yet 🤷🏽‍♀️ I try to make sure ...


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If you've watched some, for example, MMA fights, you may notice that fighters are generally tolerant to pain and injures got in process. And yes, it's really so - just because high adrenaline levels do suppress pain. Level of suppression depends on genetics and hoard of other things. But what you've described is a "sudden bite". No previous ...


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As someone who's worked in law enforcement and forensic mental health settings, the key element is to get the person on their back as soon as possible. Most deaths in custody/restraint result from positional asphyxia which is far less likely when supine. From here, control of the extremities without pressure on the joints is the safest option, so to control ...


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