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2

Certainly. People throw untrained punches in brawls all of the time, and you need only look at the newspapers to see the number of times some parent has taken a swipe at their kid and caused them injury. It's even very possible to do without intent, turning to point to something and catching someone in the face with your outswung arm.


1

This answer aims to add to, rather than replace, those which have already been posted. I also wish to distance my comments from issues of mask-wearing and COVID. I acknowledge they are realities of your current situation, but I think there's value in discussing your question in the context of a return to relative normality. Exhaustion is technically an ...


4

No martial arts training will prepare you to fight unarmed against multiple armed opponents. Your basic options: Move somewhere else. Collective action. You need a functioning government that takes public safety concerns seriously.


1

You don't. Mental strength is for filtering out instinctual messages you don't need, not for ignoring body status information. What messages do you need? In this case you have a sense that you're not getting enough air. Some people feel that way whenever they tire, you're describing it as unusual. You can confirm poor oxygenation with an under $20 O2 monitor ...


3

Some thoughts on it: Fights are exhausting. You can see it in competitions all across disciplines. If many highly trained athletes tire within a handful of minutes, despite stalling or round pauses, no need to necessarily blame it on yourself. Normal street fights are fast and don't last long, many not even a minute. Wearing a mask is a great hindrance ...


1

For most people asking how to improve their mental strength, I'd suggest taking up a martial art - mental strength is one of the main benefits of doing so. As you're already doing that, and have been for a while by the sounds of it, if you lack mental strength now it might be a failure by your instructor. I don't know you, your fitness, your health or your ...


1

There are two ways to stop someone: pain compliance and damage. 1a. Techniques that cause pain in a dojo often fail against resisting opponents once they get a little adrenaline or if they're just used to fighting and know how to shrug off a little pain. 1b. You didn't do enough to damage to stop your opponent. It's that simple. You don't shrug off a ...


-3

I have to be not politically-correct and point out one of the reasons: my instructor has us wear masks This is one of the primary problems to focus on. Not being able to breathe normal, fresh air is going to significantly reduce your stamina during fight. It will lower your blood oxygen saturation much faster, and also make you rebreathe some of the ...


3

I'd say your instructor is partly right, but it isn't the whole truth. Your muscles need oxygen to work, as does your brain. When you use more oxygen than you resorp through skin and breathing, this means you at least in part run anaerobically (= without oxygen), ie. you first burn creatine in your muscles. This works for about 90 seconds until you massively ...


1

Do you ever watch MMA or boxing? If you do, you may notice that many fights take more than ten minutes, involve dozens or even more than a hundred landed strikes, and the fighters are often not noticeably impaired until well into the fight. Of course, these athletes are exceptionally well-conditioned to take punishment and keep going; on the other hand, ...


3

The three most likely reasons this happened: Your assailants were too strong A common myth of martial arts is that they are an equalizer. If you are fighting someone who is much larger or stronger, you can have the best technique in the world and still fail. There was a video I saw a while back with a sub-100 pound master against a guy who was over 300 ...


14

Regarding cardio, there's a saying in fitness that being fit for cardio in an activity makes you fit for cardio in that area. Take someone who can run for two hours at a time, and tell them to attack the heavy bag non-stop, and they'll be gasping within minutes. Similarly, take someone who has learned to keep punching and kicking the heavy bag for long ...


3

I doubt that your instructor is an expert in human physiology. When your whole chest is heaving for air and each strike threatens to make you light-headed, that's not a mental issue. But mentally: Could you have friends or sparring partners hit you progressively harder over multiple weeks of sparring, so that you have to keep "fighting back". ...


1

This is what you're not going to get from the dojo people, who view martial arts as a restrained, mannered, and honorable discipline. That's the best view, but it takes a tremendous amount of hard work and dedication. The ones who are good make huge sacrifices for their art. The prize fighting enthusiasts understand martial arts even less. For them it's a ...


2

You have very little to work with here. The solution is probably arguably usually to raise your hands and try to placate him "OK, you won, whatever you want, man". If he started the fight by being in a psycho rage, or you think he's on drugs or a gangbanger, i.e., you think he's going to shoot you, and you're more than a few feet from him, pivot, ...


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