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Anyone with more mass than you has more momentum in a charge. If he's taller but lighter, he's more lanky and is less likely to knock you down. There are better ways to stop a charging opponent. dodge him (most obvious)then attack from behind Leap frog over his head (Place your hands out, to catch his shoulders or head and push off the ground, like the iron ...


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From my expertise derived from watching the kubotan-related "Hard to Hurt" channel's videos on YouTube, not very effective. Yes, conceivably you could hit an exact point with it and do some damage. Much more likely, you and the bad guy will be flailing and grappling, and you'll be adrenalized and losing your fine motor skills, and you won't have a ...


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Slaps can be devastating if the full body is behind it. I watched a friend use it to the side of the head against the leader of a group that was considering a brawl, and he followed through, slamming the opponent to the ground, and startling and demoralizing the group. Slaps the fave can also be applied more quickly than most punches, and cause the eyes to ...


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Any equalizer is typically better than no equalizer, but I would not personally use a carabiner because it's not made for this purpose, and you can't grip it effectively: The caribiner will rotate forward or backward, and will likely damage your knuckles when you strike by smashing back against them. This also means that the force going into the opponent ...


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A kubotan can be hugely effective, but punching with it in the manner of a roll of quarters is not recommended because you're likely to hurt your hand. Kubotans are effective because of physics—puts all the force into a small surface area capable of delivering a definitive strike. The best method to use a kubotan practically is to use a backhanded grip, a ...


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fwiw, alternate answer to Dave Liepmann's—work up to a thousand pushups a day on your fists on a hard surface. Will harden your fists without damaging the joints, & strengthen your wrists for punching. If you get attacked, you'll have explosive power and good conditioning. (This worked for me very well before I started training in martial arts, and I ...


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Fighting techniques are a small part of self-defense. Just a few other parts: Situational awareness, good safety habits, staying out of rough areas at the wrong times, the ability to defuse situations, the realization that in heated arguments YOU'RE being an a-hole just as much as the other guy, the willingness to leave a bar or area when someone gets in ...


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People who train for many years in samuraijutsu and ninjutsu of the Bujinkan in-person with a Dai Shihan will definitely be good at many real street fight or self defense situations against different opponents. There is so much about the skills of a Bujinkan practitioner that is not apparent to other fighters. Don’t believe all the fake news about the ...


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I’m not sure of your context. If this is temporary, your instructor is your best bet. But in the complete absence of an instructor, then the way I’m reading your question is “how do I learn self defense by myself”. In which case, there’s not a whole lot you can do. Strength and conditioning are useless, IMHO, because such does not teach self defense ...


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Self-defense doesn't mean fighting. Self-defense means techniques to ensure your safety/survival in a situation where someone/unknown may want/try to harm you. The first two major lessons in self-defense are awareness and situational capacity. Avoid locations you know to be dangerous, best as possible Arm yourself Buy a gun.....If you ever have to use ...


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The highest priority for self-defense is strength & conditioning. This is 10x more true if you do not have a training partner. Ideal S&C techniques for limited training time would include deadlifts, chin-ups, barbell squats, overhead press, distance running (by distance, between 1 mile and 5km; by time, up to an hour at a steady pace or fartleking), ...


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ANY level of protection in a knife fight is more apparent. Because those cuts hurt. If you ever saw the movie "Under Siege" Tommy Lee Jones and Steven Seagal enage in a knife fight, Jones' character sustains many cuts but a leather jacket kept serious damage at bay. A hard metal watch, jewelry, gauntlets, anything that can protect you


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I have not encountered this strategy in seminars or regular training of Krav Maga. This involved personnel with extensive experience in law enforcement and military training as well as bouncers who actually have been stabbed. Therefore, I would say that it cannot be counted as "relevant strategy" taught in contemporary self-defence as far as my ...


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