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I was always taught Tongbeiquan (通背拳) is effective for multi-opponent situations, although the wiki only mentions two person sparring. "Tong Bei" is considered exotic, even in Chinese wushu because the techniques are highly unique, distinct from the contemporary core of Shaolin (here "northern boxing") and Hun Ga ("southern boxing&...


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I have no experience with psychiatric patients, but assuming I want to restrain someone by myself without anyone getting hurt, my position of choice would be the wrestling hammerlock position with the other person face down. In this position, you have control of the near side arm with it behind the back and your weight on top. You have one hand free. From ...


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Just wanted to preface this, I've been sparring since around age 6, and all testings require a 1v2 to 1v5 versus the national team members, so please take what I say with a grain of salt. Whenever you're attacked on the street, your first priority should be getting out of there. Most attacks can be random, after provoking some drunk guy, but practice fight ...


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This has an accepted answer, so this is purely a supplementary answer. There are numerous ways to control an opponent's body. Among all of them, only those which employ the neck are potentially lethal. The reasons are obvious—restriction of breath and potential damage to the spinal cord.


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The bagua strategy outline for fighting multiple opponents: Fight standing up. Always move, forwardish. Your back is hardest to defend, and against multiple opponents it is not possible to always face all opponents. Make it more difficult by not presenting a stationary target. Don't expect to be able to stand in one place and turn around without getting hit....


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Steve's answer raises a bunch of good points which already cover a lot what I would have to say on martial arts as well, so I would like to have this answer to be understood as complementary. About multiple opponents in martial arts Generally, martial arts rarely train multi-opponent situations. Aikido does so on higher levels, but as already said, this is ...


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The question asks if there are martial arts that do better at multiple opponent fights than other martial arts. My simple answer is: No. The more nuanced answer is: There is some truth in what many martial arts teach for multiple attacker situations, but it's generally unrealistic and not very practical. I'll explain why in a moment. It's hard enough ...


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The question asks for a detailed analysis of Taiji as it compares and contrasts with other martial arts. Looking beyond the specifics, there's an underlying question here about how Taiji is different from other martial arts. If we understand that, maybe it will help answer the specific questions. The first thing to realize about Taiji is that it's an "...


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Overall Sinking of the joints is one of the core techniques, and a method of directing/re-directing force. It allows directing force even in unexpected directions. Sinking of the joints (wrists, elbows, knees, hips) makes it difficult for an opponent to lock you. "Emptying" is another pillar, and is used both to mitigate impact of strikes, and ...


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