17

It will be pretty difficult to do Judo alone. You can practice kung fu or any other martial art with forms (pre-arranged patterns) by yourself though. If you don't already know the martial art, though, you're setting yourself up for failure. Save yourself and any future teacher a few headaches and don't try to learn from DVDs or Youtube. Don't get me ...


15

Running seems like it is the thing for you: You can start now and improve your techniques by going to the gym to find a trainer, going to a run club, and reading books and magazines on running. You can also get a whistle and blow it (while running to a safe place) to attract attention to your predicament. Martial arts take long time to learn. Self defence ...


14

Protecting yourself from bullying has more to do about confidence than about martial arts. Learning martial arts will raise your confidence, but coming across as unsure and uncertain, even if you're a grandmaster, will still get you bullied. Because of that reason, the style of kungfu matters less. The club you go to and your trainer matters more. Make sure ...


13

Source: Black Belt in Ju Jitsu First, I completely agree that learning to fight won't fix your problem; it'll probably just get you into trouble. However, learning a martial art is a great way to build confidence and THAT can definitely help with the bullying (speaking from experience here). One thing to note though, is that NO martial art is "fast and ...


13

It's hard to tell without examining or testing the actual item, but I'm skeptical that they would be the same. It's marketed as a "novelty", which is often used as shorthand for "not intended for regular use", and which suggests that the straps and sides of the bag probably aren't engineered to actually hold the weight of a properly ...


11

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


10

You have two requests here. First, you can learn to defend yourself against an average person relatively quickly - just as much as you can learn basic first aid, relatively quickly. Whether it will be enough or not really depends on the luck of the draw of the situation you face. Going to train once or twice a week, for a few months, in a school aimed ...


10

You can't actually "harden" soft tissue through conditioning. You can: A) increase the muscle strength and density (though strength training), which gives you better ability to absorb/resist hits B) condition yourself to work through the pain and numbness by regularly taking thigh hits. Otherwise, it comes to do avoiding the hit, or doing some form of ...


9

The best thing I found was to try and sit in seiza more often. This helps to get used to the position and will also help you to find your "sweet spot". For me that is with my weight on top of my feet with the ankles pushing out. Outside of just sitting in seiza try to stretch out quads before and after as that also helps with position. - Disclaimer my ...


8

Your option to learn new things is pretty limited. Forms have some, limited value Since you've mentioned kung fu as one of the directions you might go, there's plenty of video online of various forms and lots of books to back it up that you can do. This might help you develop leg strength and coordination, but your options for learning how it flows/...


8

TL;DR No, it's not essential. Full splits are an impressive display of flexibility, but few martial arts include them as anything other than a nifty party trick or something for exhibitions.


8

There are two important points to consider: Full splits are not essential in many martial arts systems. Kicking itself may be secondary. The motivation behind full splits is often high kicking, which is high-risk in combat. See Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight. No one expects beginning students to have full splits. If your martial arts school ...


8

It doesnt count as experience. This is mostly due to the fact that the extra knowledge you have gained hasn't been tested and played with, which in it self could be dangerous should you rely on it. Be honest and state the number of years actively training. The improved knowledge is a good thing but without having a chance to apply it it would be like ...


8

I'm generally opposed to anime questions, but there are a significant handful of MMA fights where one fighter is known to be semi-conscious yet still fighting. Edgar/Maynard 2 is my go-to example: Edgar is clearly concussed early, and has said on the record that he has no memory of multiple rounds, but he fought to a split draw nevertheless. He picked ...


7

I see no problem in training on the beach as long as the sand is dry, clean (no rubbish), relatively plain (no bumpiness) and fine (it adapts better to the impact, same reason why it should be dry). It might be slightly harder than a mat, but it's far from dangerous. It might even improve ukemi by 'punishing' bad posture or lack of tension. Modern mats are ...


7

Learn to walk away… Your problem is that you get angry: stop doing that. Anger management classes and/or techniques should be your first step. Your second step should be to learn about de-escalation techniques. Finally, a trip to no nonsense self defence is needed -- especially the notes on "street fighters". All these will help you not get into those ...


7

From the definition of experience: The knowledge or skill acquired by a period of practical experience of something, especially that gained in a particular profession. By that definition, your two years hiatus from martial arts should not count as experience regardless of the amount of time you fantasied about martial arts. In addition, years of ...


7

From a physics perspective, one way to think about striking is impulse: To have an effective strike, you want to: Maximize mass. The normal advice is use your whole body to strike. This means that you do not want to punch simply by using your arm. Most styles deliver more mass behind a strike by rotating the hips. You can also step while striking. It helps ...


6

Well you're talking about the specifics of when and how to breathe, but maybe you really should be asking about why one breathes and what are you trying to do with it. Generally speaking, when one exhales, this creates tension in the abdominal area. At the same time that your abdomen is tensing, you will also create tension in the entire core (the abdomen, ...


6

Is a master always required to gain mastery over this martial art? Yes. If you try really hard you could get some basic ability yourself (from books, videos etc.), but to gain anything approaching mastery you need good instruction (and other skilled people to practice with). The simpler the style is technically the more you can teach yourself, so ...


6

First, let's cover some basic context. Coordination of muscle is key It helps to have muscle, but... the real key is coordinating your muscles to work together to generate power. It's the same reason power lifters, who can undeniably lift and move great weight, don't make good baseball pitchers - the pitcher's ability is about coordination to generate ...


5

There's some options, though it becomes really specific to your ability. I made a youtube vid talking about the general issues of self defense with mobility issues last year. Here's some things to look at more specific to your question: Can you pivot on your weak leg? In some cases of leg weakness, people end up "locking" the leg. While this ends up ...


5

Can I learn martial arts by own? Yes you can - but all you will have is an academic knowledge of the art, you won't be able to rely on it to defend yourself. To be honest you will probably hurt yourself more than your opponent if you relied upon it without some expert instruction. You can read all the books and watch all the youtube clips you want, but it'...


5

"Meditation, breathing, or visualization" practice will not help with what is essentially a failure of physicality and technique. Technique usually improves with in-class practice, but physicality requires out-of-class work to develop for most adults who are not genetically gifted. You must attain a basic level of athleticism--that is, physical strength, ...


5

You seem already more than fit enough. Everyone will have their own weaknesses, be it strength, stamina, balance, flexibility, or whathaveyou. All the boxing or kickboxing programs I've seen have warmup and conditioning parts to their classes/sessions. They involve rope jumping, calisthenics, shadow boxing, bag hitting, stretching, etc. Doing those, over ...


5

Yes, no, maybe... It all depends on what you mean by "appropriate". First, the themes and matters discussed in the book are suitable for an adult. If you were a teenager or child, things might be different but at 19 you should have the matturity to read whatever you chose. Second, should you follow the advice given (if any) in the books is up to you. I ...


5

Buy the Tao of Jeet Kune Do. Because Reasons: The Tao of Jeet Kune Do is Bruce's treatise on his philosophy - the philosophy which underpins his later teachings. Absolute beginners should find teachers, not books, to learn technique from. You can try copying the stuff in "Bruce Lee's Fighting Method", but until you already have a basis in martial arts, ...


5

Mastery, you want a qualified instructor. But, that's not to say there isn't anything you can learn on your own. Let's consider these factors: Conditioning You can do a lot of conditioning exercises on your own. A lot of the strength, balance and flexibility training can be done solo, and in many cases are not very different than calisthetics outside ...


5

There's two things that increase stamina: cardio (fast, regular movement) and muscle endurance. Pretty much any regular movement can do that - Shaolin training or anything else. You can do a few minutes every day up to the recommended at least 30 minutes of cardio that doctors recommend, and of course, more once you get the endurance going. Understand ...


5

TL;DR The duration of a fight bares no relation to the risk of injury as clearly demonstrated by countless matches. Attacking first leaves one open to very serious legal repercussions. Expecting to be attacked at all times and places is a mark of paranoia. The duration of a fight has nothing to do with your probabilities of being injured. The nature of the ...


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