13

It's hard to tell without examining or testing the actual item, but I'm skeptical that they would be the same. It's marketed as a "novelty", which is often used as shorthand for "not intended for regular use", and which suggests that the straps and sides of the bag probably aren't engineered to actually hold the weight of a properly ...


8

I'm generally opposed to anime questions, but there are a significant handful of MMA fights where one fighter is known to be semi-conscious yet still fighting. Edgar/Maynard 2 is my go-to example: Edgar is clearly concussed early, and has said on the record that he has no memory of multiple rounds, but he fought to a split draw nevertheless. He picked ...


5

It's definitely not the same. But that doesn't mean it's bad. Many punching bags are much too soft or hard for certain types of training. Similarly, many are too light or heavy. If you are training to box, you need to match your bag to the weight class of your opponents. During training, you can use bags of different weights, densities, and styles to help ...


5

I think it depends on what you expect to train. If you want to train impact, you need something firm and heavy. If you just need a surface with a little resistance and some heft to practice learning what it feels like to make impact, it doesn't matter. What matters about any tool, in any craft or discipline, is what results you expect it to produce.


5

Apologies for the late answer. While I am shadow boxing, I always wonder if it's necessary to ... Yes. It is absolutely necessary that you do everything in your shadowboxing that you would do in your sparring sessions or fights. If you like throwing the spinning side kick when you are sparring, you must throw hundreds of them when you are shadowboxing. The ...


4

Don't use bands: Whatever you do, I suggest you don't use any bands. If your body mechanics work a certain way, you need to consciously work on it if you want to change it. Artificially restricting your legs to move a certain way is likely to cause injuries and unnecessary strain on the joints. When you shadowbox, go hard and fast so you get tired, and then ...


3

The highest priority for self-defense is strength & conditioning. This is 10x more true if you do not have a training partner. Ideal S&C techniques for limited training time would include deadlifts, chin-ups, barbell squats, overhead press, distance running (by distance, between 1 mile and 5km; by time, up to an hour at a steady pace or fartleking), ...


3

To some degree, there is no real difference between observing a student via a Zoom session and observing them in-person from a judging table, as is generally done for testing. You only have a single point of view, but you can more or less watch them real-time. If you're having difficulty observing fluidity of movement due to transmission issues, you could go ...


3

Traditionally, the information on where to strike with what has been conveyed via charts, today often available in poster form. As regards training, I've usually experienced it via my teacher watching me execute strikes, either halted ones on a living target, or more deliberate ones on a humanoid dummy and critiquing me. I could see virtue in labeling such ...


3

The question is pretty broad, but I think I understand what you're asking. The main thing to realize is that footwork is absolutely essential to a good defense. Why? For the complete answer, read my answer at the following link first: Defence in martial arts in general The gist of that answer is that it takes time for people to react to anything happening. ...


2

I recommend picking up a yoga block and placing it between the legs so that it supports the butt. Start with the block in the highest position, then after you get comfortable in this height (could be a few months) then move to the medium height until comfortable, then the smallest height until you get comfortable and finally remove the block. Wishing you all ...


2

I took boxing classes at Peter Welch's gym in South Boston. Seemed like in every class, he said, "smart feet, smart fighter". Actually, it sounded like "smarht feet, smarht fighter". Footwork He drilled into us that foot placement was critical for getting the most power out of a punch with the correct amount of effort. To change having a wide stance all ...


1

I’m not sure of your context. If this is temporary, your instructor is your best bet. But in the complete absence of an instructor, then the way I’m reading your question is “how do I learn self defense by myself”. In which case, there’s not a whole lot you can do. Strength and conditioning are useless, IMHO, because such does not teach self defense ...


1

Self-defense doesn't mean fighting. Self-defense means techniques to ensure your safety/survival in a situation where someone/unknown may want/try to harm you. The first two major lessons in self-defense are awareness and situational capacity. Avoid locations you know to be dangerous, best as possible Arm yourself Buy a gun.....If you ever have to use ...


1

Slaps can be devastating if the full body is behind it. I watched a friend use it to the side of the head against the leader of a group that was considering a brawl, and he followed through, slamming the opponent to the ground, and startling and demoralizing the group. Slaps the fave can also be applied more quickly than most punches, and cause the eyes to ...


1

It happened to me this weekend... yes I trained when young (16years old now 51years old) with Robert and Danny Williams, Ti crane in High Point NC. I got sucker punched and was knocked out...I hit the concrete floor, back of my skull lumped up. When I got my sight and hearing back I was being tackled... When I asked why I was being punched and beat up by my ...


1

I don't practice Iaido or Kendo myself, but I will have a stab at answering this. As Iaido is often practised Solo this is perhaps one of the few styles that could be learned with minimal input from an instructor. Kendo would be much harder to learn in this way as it is a pair form style with blunt sword substitutes and is designed for competition in ...


1

Bruce liked Chinese food and used to have a lot of variety in his food. I don't know much about the specifics of his diet. His fitness recommendation from the Tao of Jeet Kune Do is as follows: Monday, Wednesday, Friday Skipping Forward Bend Dand Jumping Jack Squat High Kick Waist Twisting Palm-Up Curl Roman Chair Knee Drawing Side Bend Palm-Down Curl ...


1

The problem is that without a skilled instructor and regular classes, what you'll learn won't be worth much. People sometimes talk about "direct transmission"—here the idea that you need that close interaction with a master as their disciple to truly grasp the essence of the art. This relationship often extends for many decades, or even a lifetime,...


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