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10

In Japanese styles, it is unquestionably about cleanliness. They don't wear outside shoes in one's home, and zori are used for that purpose. But zori make it somewhat difficult to train in, and as well, expensive tatami mats do not wear well with shoes worn. So, they train barefoot. I've seen many a Japanese instructor painstakingly give the hairy ...


6

Whilst I cannot answer the origins, there are many reasons why I still instruct barefoot to a barefoot class. Safety - when we involve blocks of kicks - any design in the shoes worn, hard plastics or metal especially, could damage the blocker in an inconsistent way (making it harder for the blocker to build confidence) Grip is consistent - whilst shoes ...


5

This answer does not directly address the karate aspect, but I think it is still relevant, as Collett89 has pointed out in his comment. The development of your feet and legs depends upon the environment you put them in. Training barefoot forces you to use your feet to a greater degree than when in shoes. For some people and their shoes, this is a much ...


5

For kickboxing, the main concern is that you don't want the shoe to be used to hit the other person. It can make the impact stronger and can really do damage. So it's usually forbidden, during sparring at least. During normal gym activity (not sparring), it might be okay to wear shoes. I recommend wrestling shoes, because they stay on tight, aren't bulky, ...


5

I infer from your tone that you consider this repulsion towards dirt slightly irrational, but are unable to overcome it. If that is indeed true, you may like to try these minimalistic options, which I have adopted from barefoot running considering the similar spread of foot: Elastic bandage Crepe bandage Duct tape They are cheap, no-frills and easily ...


4

If you go to a trampoline park in the UK you have to wear "grip socks" - a sock with little rubber grips embedded in them. Searching on sites such as Amazon for "grip socks" they are readily available in a variety of colours/sizes. I have in my classes allowed students with foot injuries to train in these socks to protect plasters/bandaging and give a ...


3

Some kicking styles do use shoes: in Savate, shoes are worn in training and sparing. In Japanese culture, wearing shoes indoor is considered impolite and dirty. Thus, shoes are taken off at the front door. All dojo are indoor buildings thus I can safely assume that shoes would not be worn there. An array of socks and indoor slippers do exists but they are ...


3

I use sambo-shoes which are made for use on mats. They are pretty much the only type of shoe that is allowed in the place I train. They are soft and therefore OK for kicks like sidekicks. The only problem for kickboxing may be that headkicks are not a good idea, because of the shoestrings; this can be overcome by using foot protection such as a large shin ...


3

Even if you wear some kind of socks they're going to absorb sweat & grime. Personally, I clean my feet (& entire body) thoroughly, using a bristles brush and scrub with pumice. I've found that preventing callus buildup between the toes to be crucial to preventing athelete's foot (a hot soak to soften up the hard tissue will help when removing it, I ...


3

FWIW, I've read Bruce Lee had a significant difference in leg length too: “You probably are not aware of it,” he said, “but my left leg is almost one inch shorter than the right. That fact dictated the best stance for me – my right foot leading. Then I found because the right leg was longer, I had an advantage with certain types of kicks, since the ...


2

Too long for a comment, but perhaps not really an answer: The science of shoes is not as advanced as you might expect, and certainly not for martial arts. For running, which is practiced much more widely than martial arts, it's not clear that decades of shoe development has improved matters, especially in terms of injuries. "Normal" shoes change the way ...


1

For round kicks, even with lightweight shoes, I have trouble pulling my toes back to any significant degree so as to kick with the ball of the foot. Kicking the bag with the point of the toe would hurt your opponent more, but also jams the inside of the toe of the shoe right down into my toes, painfully. (Try it - maybe the fit of your particular pair of ...


1

When ordering Tabi, always use centimeters. If your foot is shorter than 10.5 US, you're in luck; you can actually use a piece of 8.5"x11" paper. Put your foot across the paper, your longest toe to one corner, heel toward the opposite, and use a pencil to make close to both. Then measure with a standard tape measure. You do not want to upsize tabi if you ...


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