Hot answers tagged

9

Special thanks to @JohnP and @Fuzzyboots for an interesting discussion in the chat (Link to the Open Roda discussion). The answer is, for me anyway, is IF there is any doubt that your child is not receiving all he/she can from a Taekwondo school, pull them out and send them to another school. Do not get caught up in the titles, belt levels etc. Do what is ...


8

Quite frankly, yes, that's basically exactly what you do, ask them to stop giving you advice. If you want to be nice about it, thank them, but say that you really need to concentrate, and the talking is distracting you.


6

Dying your hair reflects upon you and your personality, not the art. It allows you to better express yourself, but it doesn't change who you are. Any approval or disapproval you get as a result is coming from a personal level. The only thing any instructor should be concerned about is whether the dye is likely to leach onto equipment or other classmate's ...


6

Is this guy older than you? I roll this way because I am a solid 10-15 years older than most people in my gym. Rolling hard tends to injure people more quickly, and I suspect this person may have had enough of that. I also started working with a defensive mindset years ago. I let people pass my guard and attempt submissions, because I find the experience ...


5

As someone who's been trying to get his parents to quit smoking for the last 30 years, I kind of understand his passion. But while he's right on a certain level (you are, in fact, hurting yourself and others around you when you smoke), there are, however, better ways to say things and, most likely, better metaphors. As far as instructors go, you probably ...


5

Offense is always taken, not given. My answer may appear to be harsh, but it's based on experience and common sense. I won't justify the instructor you talk of, but I also won't condemn him - it's not my place to do either. What should I do or say now? If your feelings are hurt so much that it's irredeemable then clearly this isn't the right training ...


4

It should be fine to ask why techniques are performed in a particular way. Good practitioners understand why and do more than blindly follow what they have been taught. Good teachers will be able to tell you why. A poor answer is something like, "our style has always done it this way". Keep in mind you may not have sufficient experience to understand the ...


4

Rather than engage in mind reading, I suggest you simply talk with this person and ask them to give more resistance. Mutually negotiate some level of resistance and intensity that is beneficial to both.


3

Switch instructors. Unless this instructor is like... an Olympic level coach with decades of experience and you really love the sport, just go look for other instructors. We had a ton of kids from Korea switch over to here a couple years ago because there were a couple younger instructors (my coach likes to call them 21 year old hotshot who thinks they know ...


3

What do you guys think? I think that you should understand that he's only one in 7.4 billion people you share the world with, and that there's no particular reason to think he's a more thoughtful, informed, considerate or accomplished person than you at anything other than - at least the physical aspects of - martial arts. As such, his opinion puts him ...


3

I think the best thing to do is to ask your Master/Senior Instructor. This kind of thing can vary widely from school to school, but in most modern styles there is nothing disrespectful about having funky hair.


3

Some instructors love to contrast and compare, and some instructors consider it highly disrespectful. There is an old school mentality from some of the more traditional styles which treat it almost like a religion - mentioning anyone else is considered insulting ("If you want to know more about what they teach, why are you here then?"). I don't find that ...


2

As per my input in the chat, I think the answer really depends on your goals and whether you feel it's worth the cost. If your concern is competence and a "legitimate" belt, then you may want to look at another school. If you're just looking for your child to have a fun time with his friends, the cost is reasonable, and they're not actually being unsafe, you ...


1

If a much higher belt gives you opportunities during free rolling, then you take those opportunities as best you can. Don't go easy. Force them to dial up their intensity because you're passing their guard, crushing them in a pin, squeezing them out of air with a body triangle from the back, and choking them unconscious. Or, try to get them to submit from ...


1

Be very careful, I would not take him to two WTF schools at the same time. Here's why: Most "WTF" schools are actually Kukkiwon schools - Kukkiwon is the authority which issues dan certificates. In this case, your two schools are teaching your son the same curriculum, except one accelerates its students to dan certification faster than the other. The ...


1

There's one part I haven't seen mentioned yet. As far as we can tell, the trainer may have as well meant it not in a lack of respect way. He could as well have meant it in a self-control and self-discipline way. Those are of utmost importance in martial arts. If you don't have the self-control and self-discipline to stop smoking, how can he be sure you won't ...


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