6

To supplement the above info, a few styles (of Southern Shaolin arts) that may have been left out: TaiZu Quan (grand Ancestor Fists) LuoHan Quan (Bhoddidarma) WuMei Quan Southern Mantis TaiZu is supposedly founded by the Southern Sung emperor. t was 'designed' for military use, i.e.: smile and effective. It is based on the principle of using the arms as ...


4

To answer some of the points raised in the original post: Was the Southern Shaolin Temple real and if so which location is valid? I do not have an exact date, but from our oral history, it was destroyed by the Ching army, so that puts it in the range of about 400yrs! There's also a theory that there was a bunch of smaller, scattered temples instead of one ...


4

The history regarding the Shaolin temple is very muddy due to the fact that when the temple was being destroyed, so were many of its records and etc. As for research being Chinese only, you do have to remember that many of these far east countries (China, Japan, Korea) have all been fairly closed up until the 1900's. I mean there are barely any records of ...


4

You can find a great starting point for learning about the southern styles' history, techniques and teachers at this wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_martial_arts. From the Wiki: Chinese martial arts can also be categorized by location, as in northern (北拳) and southern (南拳) as well, referring to what part of China the styles ...


1

The Wikipedia page on the Southern Shaolin Monastery puts it beautifully: "The Southern Shaolin Monastery is the name of a Buddhist monastery whose existence and location are both disputed. By tradition it is considered the source of all southern Chinese martial arts. ... The following account is based on legend or folklore, with little, if any, documentary ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible