32

Emotions in general are detrimental to your sparring. Usually when I have seen this said to a student it is not because we want you to get angry, but that you are sparring as if you are afraid. If you are afraid of striking your opponent you become SLOW and hesitant. Remember here that you should only ever spar willingly (never spar if you don't want to) ...


30

NO!!!!! Get out. Get out now. As in, do not train there even one more time. There is always the chance of being injured in any martial art. That's true of any active sport, of course--but "combat sports" have an intention of everyone getting hit, kicked, etc. The requirement for safety is therefore paramount. You need to train safely if you are going to be ...


27

Your question isn't what you are really asking. Your question is "Can I learn Kung Fu without sparring", and that answer is yes. Sparring is not 100% necessary to learn any art. You can learn all the kicks, punches, blocks, stances and so forth without ever facing anything more than a heavy bag or possibly a human holding a pad/shield. What you really want ...


27

Can anyone learn martial arts techniques without sparring? Sure! I mean, you can learn that they exist. Can you learn how to effectively apply martial arts techniques without sparring? Oh, no. Gosh no. No, no, no. Nope. Sparring is how we turn things we know of into things we know how. Until you can do it in sparring it's all a bunch of theory. Not ...


22

I don't think the science is settled to a degree where we can give a solid answer, or make too many specific conclusions. Disclaimer: I'm not a kickboxer, and I haven't studied the subject deeply. Dementia pugilistica Getting hit in the head is not good for your brain. Getting hit a lot in the head is very bad for your brain. That's true regardless of ...


19

Sparring should emphatically not end in you being beaten bloody, no matter the sport. Sparring is a contact activity, and you should expect to take some knocks, but it is also an activity founded on control and trust. There's an important difference between toughening up and learning to take a hit and actually being harmed. This is doubly important for ...


17

In my experience as a male trainer and trainee the key for a hard, educational or maybe painful training is trust between all parts of the training group. Female fighters have told me that they were beaten up in training after they told their opponent to slow down. Afterwards they felt violently abused. So in such a case the trainer has the responsibility ...


15

♫ Let it go ♫ You talked to him several times, you made overtures, and still he refuses. There is no point in continuing to pester him into doing something he does not want to do. And that is okay. He does not have to train with you. It is his choice, a choice you should respect. You could tell him that you will stop pestering him but if he ever wants to,...


14

If the students are going too hard on the beginners, the instructor either don't care or has lost control of the class. It's his or her responsibility to make sure everybody is safe. Most good schools ease their beginners into sparring. They start of with some light sparring, and then progress from there. Even pro fighters spar easy a lot of the time, as it'...


14

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


14

First off, consider therapy. I know that it's not exactly martial arts advice, but it sounds like you've undergone a great deal of trauma and frankly, us just giving you training advice would be like giving cadence tips to a runner with a broken leg. You have been damaged and you need a qualified medical professional to help you with that damage. Past that, ...


14

What works for your sensei might not work from you. He is teaching you, what had worked for him. For some, they use anger for the aggressiveness it brings. Anger dominates certain opponents. And in the case of draw, the more aggressive fighter that attacks more (whether contact or not) is usually declared the winner. But anger does not work for everyone. It ...


14

While tigers can be considered savage in some sense, as in "uncivilized" or "fierce", they certainly don't get angry. When they are attacking, they have a goal in mind ("kill this prey to satisfy my hunger") and they use their instinct and physical might to reach that goal, there is no emotion. When they are defending themselves, they again use their ...


13

There are several things I can think of that might help, depending on exactly what the underlying problems are. Slow Repetition The most fundamental thing I've ever seen improve speed is slow repetition. We say that "speed comes from repetition" in my Hapkido class and when I trained with a rapier we had similar expressions: you had to go slowly before you ...


13

The primary change is that daredevil / suicide moves now lose all interest. Jumping up and hitting the top of the head Spinning kicks, in particular the spinning hook/reverse/something kick to the head super-lunge-punch All these moves, and more, are now begging for punishment much more than before, when a judge might decide to call a point and stop the ...


13

Anger is definitely not a prerequisite for sparring, specially since angry people tend to neglect their technique, but I think that you might have misinterpreted what your sensei told you. A tiger hunts with everything it has, full concentration, full physical force and deadly precision, since they hunt completely alone. Keeping this in mind and the fact ...


12

This is a good question. And to answer it, you have to understand why karate kata (forms) exist, what their original purpose was, and how kata practice differs from sparring. The original purpose of karate kata was to pass on self-defense technique to students. Each self-defense technique consists of one to three movements strung together in the sequence of ...


11

Accidents happen. However, when you have an accident with people you are not really trying to hurt - you make extra effort to make sure the accident doesn't happen again - otherwise it is not an accident. If someone's ego at losing in sparring causes them to attempt to really injure someone, that is not a safe person to work with. Consider what you are ...


11

Of course you should quit! From what you said, you are neither having fun nor learning anything. I know you are young but your time is valuable. There is no point in wasting your time with people who do not appreciate you and refuse to teach you. The shame is theirs. Find another martial art class to go to, one where you can learn, grow, and have fun. If ...


10

Try talking to them; You're sparring so they working on their toughness is dumb; toughness is not a skill that increases with practice*; it's a deteriorating factor. Being tough is a good quality to have, but it should never be someone's primary way to win. It's a backup. During sparring, where you are trying to improve, you should be working on (placing) ...


10

You're answering your own question here. In sparring they can't go light and hit with momentum and throw dangerous moves. I have seen another guy get an elbow to on the back of his neck and haven't seen him in weeks I got a very strong hook that gave me a huge black eye (after asking for them to go lighter). Last week during a seminar in ...


10

I had a Trig professor in college who asked us on day one, "What do math and sex have in common?" The answer was, "You cannot learn them through reading about them in books, and you cannot learn them through watching other people do it. You can only learn them through participation." Martial arts is so varied that one has to first ask, "What do you want to ...


10

What you're describing is a sensitivity to your own violent thoughts and actions. You feel bad even thinking about inflicting pain on a training partner, even if it's just a "tap" which you know causes no real pain. Just the thought of hitting someone over and over again causes you to feel bad. And so after 3 years of being in a style that practices that way,...


9

First of all, ask yourself this - why are you getting frustrated? Is it because you're getting your ass handed to you? Or is it because you find yourself almost getting something, but not quite? If it's because you're getting your ass handed to you...well, that's what you get for sparring with the black belts. :P But seriously, though, even if they're ...


9

I would argue that there is no such progression. While push-hands may look like a "slowed down" version of sanshou, it is an entirely different exercise on its own. The only way to progress to sanshou is to start doing it. Edit: To elaborate, the practice of sanshou (or free form sparring if you like) is an integral (albeit rarely practiced) part of ...


9

Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


9

Is the student toxic?1 If yes then get ride of him as soon as possible. If they have no desire to change, then they have to go. Actually, that might be harsh: offer him the choice of either mending his ways or training elsewhere. If maybe, then you have to figure out if they are willing to change their behaviour. Again, you need to talk to them in an open ...


9

Hi have a trained a couple of ladies over the years and here is my take on it. For starters, there is a difference between training hard and just getting beat up. While I believe that is very important that you treat a women the same way you treat a man it is also important to not discourage a women from training. First - As a women you should be aware ...


8

I can give a Hapkido perspective on this, since at least at my dojang we are taught that you keep your fists closed until you reach 1 dan, at which point you can open them (and do so more and more as you go up from there). We relax it a bit for blocks (we don't teach hard blocks until 9th kup), but not for attacks. There are two major reasons we give for ...


8

Short answer - catch your shin on your opponent's knee or elbow in a roundhouse kick without shin guards and see how you feel. ;) Or, to look at it another way - Do targets defeat the purpose in training? Does a face mask or mouth guard defeat the purpose of training? Does practising with dull/not metal throwing stars or a wooden blade defeat the purpose? ...


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