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Weight training can be beneficial, and some martial arts have a set of supplementary exercises (in Okinawa Goju Ryu we call it Hojo Undo) where you use tools like Chi'ishi (stone on a stick), Ishi-sashi (stone handles - ancient type of Kettle bell) and Nigiri Gamen (a couple of vases with necks in a size to fit a palm) for weight training. The advantage of ...


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From a TKD specific position, as it's an Olympic sport, we can look at the studies which have been carried out about it from a sport's performance perspective. The primary test of TKD specific ability is the Frequency Speed of Kick Test, which is carried out over a single 10 second bout, and then repeated 10 second efforts. This was developed by the Spanish ...


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Improving hand speed means improving Speed strength, you can do that by doing plyometrics punching with bands throwing medicine balls or dumbbells shot putting But, you should also pay attention on the execution of your punching technique. Buy that i mean you should "throw" your hands through the opponent, initiated or catapulted from the legs via the ...


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I have found that strength training once a week and power endurance once a week alongside BJJ, Thai boxing, boxing and JKD concepts helps a lot in my fitness and strength; however, if I do strength or power endurance more than once a week, I slow down and burn out. Everyone's body reacts differently; spreading my training out over a period of time makes a ...


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Strength training alongside of doing your martial art of choice is key. I've pumped my training from 1 hour to 2 hours every day and over 1 month I've increased 10 fold in my technique and power. This is all alongside my strength training of 1 to 5 reps max and it works


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"Can I get a good shot in at the right range?" Accuracy matters... but maybe not in the way you're thinking of. First, you got to be able to hit a target that is moving. Range matters a lot here. Then you have to be able to hit it in a way that you successfully transfer force into it, instead of sliding or glancing off. Along the way, you also don't ...


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Macaco gave you the link to a video from R. Dewey. I think there is not much we could add to his comment. It is fun. It trains reflexes. It is no training substitute for live training.


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The traditional speed ball with a platform is very effective if you plan to compete in western boxing or just want to simply get better at it. The reason is that the speed ball helps train your shoulders and forearms for prolonged periods of endurance. It will be very beneficial down the road if you decide to seriously take up boxing, since you’ll be able to ...


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This man is probably utilising Getsumei No Michi (Moonlit path). It sounds much more mystical than it actually is though. It is simply a mental technique for heightening your senses naturally (as opposed to utilising psychotropic drugs). It's not a spiritual exercise so much as an exercise in "daydreaming" until you reach a state of heightened sensitivity. ...


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As Dave Leipman indicated, sprints are an excellent choice, but particularly, I've heard recommended short sprints from an external signal. So basically, stand ready but relaxed and when someone blows a whistle, sprint from one side of the room to another and then relax again until the next signal. It builds reaction time and explosive power, plus it has the ...


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First of all I want to make myself clear that I a not intending to hurt anyone's feelings or trying to prove one is better than the other. Myself 32 years old. Black belt Karate. Black belt judo. Wing chun kung fu 1 year, free style wrestling 1 year and Boxing experience in amature league for 2 years. And currently studying an ancient Indian martial arts ...


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I've had a solid 2 years of strength training including Olympic weightlifting before starting martial arts, which I've pursued for over ten years since my first real fight. Strength training for minimum two years is a must for adding the necessary bulk to compete in fighting at a high level, but to really stand-out, you need weightlifting. That's why I was a ...


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Weight training is fantastic for martial arts training, but you have to do it with a goal in mind. Ask yourself which areas you need to improve strengthwise, which areas have muscles that you will use (directly or indirectly) in practicing your techniques. Also, if you do a sport like Taekwondo, keep in mind that, contrary to popular belief, while muscles ...


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I would say show me the science....I have done bodybuilding types of workouts for years along side my martial arts (Grappling, Hapkido and Krav Maga) and building some mass and muscle density have only helped with every art. It has given me strength, power and endurance. I think the key is is variety and changing up how you train. There are tons of freaky ...


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