10

Former black belt in Taekwondo here. This turned out to be a pretty long explanation. Sorry about that. But in this case, I wanted to educate rather than just inform. Judging by the question, this sounds like a young student and someone just beginning Taekwondo or karate. Back when I was 13 years old just beginning Taekwondo, I would have loved for someone ...


7

While "back kick" is mostly synonymous with "side kick" in most martial arts, there are styles that do have a back kick that is subtly but very significantly different than a side-kick. This is perhaps what you're picking up on. In a side kick, you will raise your leg up and inwards, chambering the kicking leg in a position whereby the kicking leg is ...


6

While my background is Karate, rather than BJJ, hopefully this answers at least part of your question. The first thing to remember is that this is a specialised technique. As I tell my students: 90% of the time, you'll be using the first 10% of the syllabus. That is, after all, why we teach those techniques first - they are relatively simple to learn and ...


6

It's definitely not a tornado kick (dolgae chagi, 돌개 차기). It has a number of names, Americans tend to use wheel kick, in Korea it's more commonly known as a back whip kick and in the UK we tend to use one of "reverse turning kick" or "back hook kick".


5

The 540 kick causes a lot of problems for people who are confident with the 360. This is often due to starting with the opposite leg forward to the 360. As backwards as it may sound - practice the 180 kick: this will get you more used to jumping with the kicking leg at the back. Progress that to a 360 reverse turning kick with the opposite leg. This will ...


5

This looks like the wushu butterfly twist. It's more gymnastic than useful for fighting.


5

In summary, you're attempting to regain some kicking ability that you once had but have lost due to inactivity and lack of practice. Your goals are to improve range of motion and flexibility, speed, and control even when holding your kick in place without moving at all. And you'd like to even surpass your abilities when you were once in regular practice. Yet,...


5

If you are fighting for real then you skould not kick higher than your opponent's balls. Reason is you're legs are to easy to get a hold of. Bruce Lee's high kicks and spin kicks are just for show. They look cool but if he used them in a real fight he would get his ass kicked. There are plenty of targets to hit below the balls, especially the knees. i would ...


4

They're both effective at their intended purpose. Just to be fair though, TKD also has a spinning back-kick, which is much closer to the JKD spinning kick.


4

As a MMA practicionner with 20 years of combat sports, here's my 2 cents/ideas : kicking practice helps keeps legs strong, FLEXIBLE and AGILE (very important) the fact that 'they are rarely used' does not mean u can't use them if your good enough not to get caught when throwing them (therefore you really need to practice) A kick can be as effective as you ...


4

As per mattm, it's the "butterfly twist" in Wushu. In Capoeira, it's the mariposa (which also means "butterfly" in Spanish, but in Portuguese more often translates to "moth" or "prostitute") and my copy of Unknown Capoeira: Secret Techniques of the Original Brazilian Martial Art notes that it is indeed ornamental, although, as with many spins, lashing your ...


4

I am a TKD instructor. That, and I used to do Latin. Ballroom, HipHop and Freestyle dancing. The combination of these things helped me pick up the techniques fairly intuitively, but the point is that you need to practice advanced kicks in stages: first learn to spot when you do a turn, in other words: don't swing your head, Keep your head on the target like ...


4

If you feel like there is a greater chance of injury for 540 degree kicks over 360 degree kicks, that's good, because there is a greater chance of injury. If you want to develop techniques like a 540 degree spin kick, you have to understand this is a fact of life. The physics of rotation is a good place to start. Your moment of inertia is your resistance ...


3

"However, does this mean that they shouldn't be used for self defense or MMA until you've mastered them?" There are many techniques that involve putting yourself in a "weak" position to execute it. You have interest in BJJ; if you try to do a triangle choke to defend yourself but you're not 100% comfortable with it, you'll probably get some punches to the ...


3

I'll just modify my answer from the linked question: I am a TKD instructor. That, and I used to do Latin. Ballroom, HipHop and Freestyle dancing. The combination of these things helped me pick up the techniques fairly intuitively, but the point is that you need to practice kicks in stages: first learn to spot when you do a turn, in other words: don't swing ...


3

I'll take a stab at this for you since there isn't an answer yet.... The first thing I'll say is that in the case of a side kick, moreso than any other type of spinning kick, the spin isn't about generating extra power in the kick, it's simply about opportunity and changing the direction of chambering the kick. For all of the following discussion assume ...


3

In some ways, I see this as similar to the argument about flips in Parkour. Since the basis of Parkour is the most efficient movement that you can accomplish to get from Point A to Point B, flips are sometimes seen as antithetical to proper Parkour, something to be relegated to "Freerunning" or "Tricking" where your goal is as much about presentation as it ...


2

The only real value in learning the mechanics of big, spinning, haymaker attacks is being able to accurately gauge an opponents telegraphs and punish them accordingly. Mechanically speaking, these techniques tend to be slow and overpowered. Thus, their practicality is low for use against a non-compliant opponent. Plus, it is always, always, always a bad idea ...


1

It looks like a spinning wheel kick to me.


1

Some are spinning to face backwards and kicking with toes pointed down, hips pointed away from the target. Others are spinning 3/4 of the way around and then essentially doing a side kick, toes and hips pointed to the side. Is one of these more correct? Or are these two distinct kicks. From the perspecitive of any given style or school, whether one is the ...


1

I dont know about JKD but in Taekwondo, there are many effective round kicks like one of them is called "Touch Back" which directly hits the face of opponent by sole of foot and the other kick is known simply as round kick in which opponent is hit by the heel of foot. Also there is a kick called Hook which hits chin of the oppenent. Moreover there is ...


1

I'll admit that I don't follow Steve's explanation of the difference on the spinning kicks, so I won't address that. There's also this video where they discuss another perceived difference between the two. Namely, the teacher is suggesting that all TKD (or, as he says it, Karate) back kicks require a full 360 degree spin, and are therefore slower, albeit ...


1

Different people will do this kick differently - when not simple incompetence it can be because - as with most martial arts techniques - there are alternatives giving a different combination of speed, lack of telegraphing, power, control, delayed commitment, recovery time, ability to defend yourself during and after the kick, reach, ease of blocking etc.. ...


1

My understanding is that this was a technique used in Hwa Rang Do. Since the founder of the modern system also was part of the organizing group in Korean Hapkido, it's easy to see how it could have been shared there and spread outward.


1

Personally, and I think it is a personal thing because we each have very different strengths and weaknesses, I think much of the stuff we learn in class is not meant to be applied literally. I see martial arts training as training the body so as to reduce its physical limitations, and training the mind to be confident in a greater range of abilities. The ...


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