Hot answers tagged

10

That's barely a modification of kesagatame. There's no gi, so he uses a slightly different grip. It totally counts. Just about all techniques, including pins, are modified in actual application. This is so true that the examples of throws that don't look obviously modified are shared as highlights and widely touted as beautiful paragons of the art. But a ...


10

Judo competition is not graded on the name of the technique you do. It's graded on whether you throw the opponent on their back, pin them, strangle them, put them in an armlock, or break the rules. So yes, you can use improvised or "unnamed" throws, or non-standard pins and so on, as long as it's not specifically forbidden. But if you've never ...


9

First, Krav Maga doesn't refer to itself as a martial arts. It's more appropriately called "Self defense tactics system." This might seem like marketing fluff, but the idea is that there is no art to it, and it want's to separate itself from traditional martial arts. Second, there is no sports (also known as competitive) aspect to Krav Maga. Krav Maga ...


8

Yes, omoplatas are considered a variant of ashi-gatame or hiza-gatame.1 3 The IJF Referee Commission has confirmed their legality on multiple occasions,1 2 both as a submission, and as a method of turning uke over from the turtle position: Lascau: Osaekomi. Demonstrator: *uke taps, tori points at armlock* Lascau: Ippon. Ippon. Demonstrator: [With this ...


7

Yes, the above technique would be a pin in competition judo. A pin in competition judo does not need to be a standard pin; it needs to meet the definition of a pin under the referee rules. This is good especially because judo people can get very nitpicky about what exactly constitutes a particular pin [more on that later]. If your opponent taps at any time ...


6

No they are not. The mouth guards are designed to protect against different kinds of impact most common to sports. You have the top only mouth guard which is meant to be something between your teeth for chomping impact. You have a separate top and bottom mouth guard which has a full set covering each teeth to help prevent outside impact into the teeth ...


6

Legality of te-gatame As one might infer from their presence in the video and current syllabus, the position of the Kodokan is that these bent-arm hammerlock versions of te-gatame are legal.1 2 3 The incongruence between te-gatame appearing on the IJF's list of legal techniques and the (occasional) penalisation of it in actual competition seems to stem from ...


6

Usefulness of "dangerous" moves why haven't we seen more people landing badly (or purposefully) on legs and breaking them? Because it's actually really hard to cause damage with these moves, and a lot of that is just luck. They're banned because a small but significant percentage of attempts will, due to a the opponent's split-section reaction ...


6

I think Sylvie conveys the right feeling in this article: I’ve fought over 100 times in Thailand and honestly I have never had a completely clear picture of what is and is not a legal throw in Muay Thai. There are some very obvious fouls, but others seem a gray area. I’ve had a vague sense that you cannot lift an opponent, or that you can’t “back break”, ...


5

I have seen no official documentation for this decision, so I can only relay what I have heard from international referees on this subject. Olympics The word in US referee clinics at this time was that judo was in danger of being removed from the Olympics because it was too easily confused with existing wrestling events. Remaining in the Olympics was seen ...


5

Unconventional osaekomi-waza Most legally scoring pins come under one of the 10 osaekomi-waza classifications. However, I have seen a couple of unconventional pins which as far as I am aware do not come under any of these labels: "Inverted kesa-gatame" This is a technique favoured by Matsumoto Kaori and Funakubo Haruka, used to success a number of times: ...


5

What is an "elbow-lock"? While a common misconception, armlocks which cause pain to the shoulder are not inherently illegal in Judo. The phrasing "kansetsu-waza applied to the elbow joint" is used by the Kodokan to describe joint-locks which achieve their effect by: straightening or bending the elbow joint ("locking" it in place), and stretching, bending, ...


5

Honestly, I think that Giulia Enders is using an artistic metaphor to conjure an idea of someone squatting in a relaxed but engaged position in much the same way that you might describe someone attentively awaiting a piece of post as "standing still at the door like a dog pointing" or bracing for a date rejection as "standing lightly on the balls of his feet,...


5

TL; DR: It has to do with the fact that they have separate international governing bodies (see breakdown below). The Olympics have a tiered classification system, that can be a bit confusing if you look at each different thing as a "sport", like you would for general consideration. These tiers are: Sport - Top tier, and there are limitations on the number ...


5

What you're looking for is martial arts demographics. And you want world-wide demographics. Both of which seem kind of hard to come by. The demographics you're looking for might be along the lines of: how many people are there doing martial arts, what percentage of the population is currently practicing one or has ever practiced one, average time spent per ...


5

As this is an extremely broad question, it befits an extremely broad answer. Any technique can be applied with varying degrees of success, whether armed or armored. Much of the kuden of the Bujinkan for instance is related to the sameness of arms and armor, and how techniques do not necessarily change with respect to equipment, and ultimately the goal of ...


5

Grabbing neck to throw This is illegal. Judo kata has many techniques that are forbidden in sport judo because it is only safe to practice them in controlled situations. As a referee I would call hansoku-make for IJF SOR: Article 18.5 (hansoku-make) - Prohibited Acts and Penalties To make any action this may endanger or injure the opponent ...


4

At a guess, any of the Escrima/Kali guys that like the dog brothers. http://dogbrothers.com/ Their sparring is geared for a semi no rules with weapons ( often wearing protective gear similar to armour ) see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CELN-DQI5qc


4

I do not believe so. I know of no such data being available world wide, nor would I trust any such. Mostly because even something as "number of people insured" is not precise enough. Also, some schools/styles would heavily object being lumped together because ego. There is some hope… You could look per style/school and country by looking and trawling ...


4

I do not know exactly what "crucifix" means to you, but will try to explain how I have seen this term used and how your examples relate. Judo rule change My understanding of the rule change you have illustrated is: The left position was a pin before, and is a pin now (ushiro kesa gatame). The right position was not a pin before, but is a pin now (ura ...


4

Currently there's no diagnostic assay for CTE. There's no treatment, nor is there any cure, either. According to Alzheimer's Association, the symptoms of CTE include: Memory loss. Confusion. Personality changes (including depression and suicidal thoughts). Erratic behavior (including aggression). Problems paying attention and organizing thoughts. ...


4

The IBJJF specifically bans1 two judo-throws where uke lands on their head/neck. Despite the IJF prohibiting throws which "may endanger or injure the opponent especially the opponent’s neck or spinal vertebrae", there are a number of throws where it is not uncommon5 in competition for uke to hit the mat first with their head, or impact with it after falling, ...


4

I was taught a compression armlock by a US national referee. I am not formally familiar with the term bicep slicer, but your description of the armlock matches exactly what I learned. It's a joint lock on the elbow that can be performed in a controlled manner, so there is nothing to make it illegal. It's legal. I don't recall whether I have seen this ...


4

From the Judo Chop Suey Podcast, Episode 26: Interview with Christopher Round at ~49:18, the interviewee Christopher Round, a former US Olympic hopeful, addresses this point while discussing where he reached his competitive ceiling: I started running into players who were ambidextrous. And it's very rare for a player to be very good who is ambidextrous...[...


3

Daki Age (High Lift, Slam) In judo, to escape from your opponent's guard position, you can stand up and pick them up off the mat. Once you have them off the mat, a referee will call matte and reset the match from standing. In a self-defense situation, the technique you would actually apply is daki age where you slam the opponent into the ground. This is ...


3

Note: As of Tokyo 2020, karate is an Olympic sport. Whether a sport is recognised as an Olympic sport is ultimately up to the International Olympic Committee (IOC). To qualify, a sport must necessarily: conform to the terms of the Olympic Charter have an international governing body recognised by the IOC file an application for inclusion through the IOC ...


3

One major reason for the change (in addition to making refereeing easier) was to make judo more appealing to TV audiences, and in this the IJF explicitly disavows any responsibility to adhere to Japanese aesthetic or traditional values (and hence no pressure to consider e.g. indigo): As the birthplace of judo is Japan, the techniques and spirit of judo ...


3

The IJF criteria for osaekomi-waza are thus (emphasis mine): The referee shall announce osaekomi for an applied technique when the contestant being held is controlled from every direction (from the side, rear or on top) by his opponent and must have his full back or complete upper back (scapular region) in contact with the tatami. The contestant applying ...


3

I will answer as best I can, but I expect more experienced referees may disagree. This is an example of when the Kodokan classification is not very useful given the very different applications it covers. First the Kodokan video: Legal. This is a straightforward hyperextension armlock with tori's arm as the fulcrum. Unsure. I am not familiar with this ...


3

Legal My personal understanding (sorry, no official guidance) is this use of the skirt portion of the jacket is legal. This is basically the same use of the opponent's gi as in kata juji jime. The rules are imprecisely written, which is very annoying. "Using only the fingers" would also seem to preclude ryote jime, but ryote jime is legal. Using a belt ...


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