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10

Judo competition is not graded on the name of the technique you do. It's graded on whether you throw the opponent on their back, pin them, strangle them, put them in an armlock, or break the rules. So yes, you can use improvised or "unnamed" throws, or non-standard pins and so on, as long as it's not specifically forbidden. But if you've never ...


3

As far as I am aware, all martial arts systems that teach about the eyes use this practice. This practice corresponds to the use of peripheral vision, as opposed to foveal vision. Foveal vision is more sensitive and allows discernment or color and fine detail in a small area for tasks such as reading, while peripheral vision covers a wide area and ...


3

I have not found an authoritative set of rules for Kendo (odd, to me, but maybe I'm using the wrong search terms) other than this brief set that mention no tripping or shoving opponents out of bounds, but the footage your provide is from a "Police Kendo" match, where they apparently specifically allow a broader variety of techniques. This ...


3

It basically dates back to later 19th century fencing practices at French military academies. They would drill many soldiers at once, which required a limited space. Initially, they trained outside, and to combat the uneven surface created by repeated bouts, they began using a planche, literally a board, approximately 5 meters by 0.5 meters. This was later ...


2

Contemporary wushu focuses on performance. Traditional wushu focuses on self-defense theory and application (or at least it should). So in contemporary wushu, every movement is "flashy" to improve its appearance and level of difficulty. While the techniques themselves are taken from traditional wushu, the emphasis is on getting more air, more ...


2

(Just to add some sources): I can't find a freely accessible copy of the FIK's Regulations Of Kendo Shiai and Shinpan, but it appears most local rulesets based off of this1 2 3 prohibit foot sweeps (though body checks appear to be permitted under some rules if performed to instigate a technique): (Miscellaneous and Prohibitive acts) ... 2. Tripping up or ...


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I've been interested in strategy since early childhood, which led to game theory, which led to AI theory. AI theory is useful in general, and taught me that the best way to think about dimensionality is "degrees of freedom". (Algorithms can think in n-dimensions, 800 dimensions as a example.) One of the lovely things about the "sweet science&...


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Q: How does competition fighting differ from self-defense? A: The other answers here round out this answer as well. Competition fighting is usually done in a well-controlled environment. The opponents are commonly "fairly" matched by experience and weight, and they are aware that of the intentions of the opposing party. Self-defense relies strongly ...


2

The kata-sankaku prohibition is about danger to the neck joints in my understanding. In the guillotine position (your footnote #2 with the yellow background), you threaten the neck joints, while you can apply the Peruvian necktie variant without threatening the neck joints even while blocking with the legs. As long as you do not crank the neck down, I expect ...


1

The straigt answer is : no, there are no disembowelling techniques in Kendo. Today's Kendo is detached from its original martial purpose (which is nodawady found partially in the Kenju-tsu practice). A reminescence from such a technique is the "Do" strike which is intended to cut you in half. The modern Kendo is the fruit of the principles ...


1

I feel there's more fairness, safety, yet conflict in competition than self-defense. In competition, it's a consensual, bare-handed, one-on-one fight in a limited space managed by a referee whose job is to prevent serious injuries and deaths. Fighting skills are still useful in self-defense, but since you can't assume many of those conditions, fighting is ...


1

Whether it's sport or "real", fighting is different from self-defense. Self-defense is about dealing with common, everyday scenarios that you might find yourself in. It is "do this if he does that". For example, he puts you in a side head-lock, so you need to hammer strike to his groin, then reach down to his ankle and lift his leg up. ...


1

Practitioners of traditional wushu, as a modern person would interpret this term, probably do not call what they practice traditional wushu but something more specific. Traditional wushu is basically a catch-all category for Chinese martial arts that are not contemporary wushu. Traditional Traditional martial arts were suppressed in Communist China during ...


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