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14

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


13

Am I allowed to use Krav Maga for any case of self-defense? Of course you are, within the normal parameters. You will only use what you need with the amount of force required in order to defuse and escape from a situation. The amount of force that is considered "legal" will differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction based on current law and precedent case law ...


13

Against knives, that's a terrible position. In bladed arts like kali, escrima, and penjak silat, you see it appear as the briefest of transition phases, usually if you have a blade yourself but it's not a position to hold. With your arms crossed over like that, it's easy to control and trap both arms with one hand, allowing your attacker's free hand (the ...


13

Your intuition is correct. It is a very vulnerable position. That should give you a clue about its bunkai. For those that don't know, Bunkai is the Okinawan karate term used to refer to the practice of analyzing a kata for its self-defense applications. Right off the bat, you know this is not a block. And you can conclude that because it would be insane to ...


13

Protecting yourself from bullying has more to do about confidence than about martial arts. Learning martial arts will raise your confidence, but coming across as unsure and uncertain, even if you're a grandmaster, will still get you bullied. Because of that reason, the style of kungfu matters less. The club you go to and your trainer matters more. Make sure ...


12

Depending on your chosen style, going for a 90 degrees angle right from the start may not be the proper position for the horse stance. In shorinji-ryu karatedo, for instance, we usually go for about 45 degrees with the knees about shoulder width. Although we eventually end up going lower as a training exercise to build leg strength, we don't advocate doing ...


12

Source: Black Belt in Ju Jitsu First, I completely agree that learning to fight won't fix your problem; it'll probably just get you into trouble. However, learning a martial art is a great way to build confidence and THAT can definitely help with the bullying (speaking from experience here). One thing to note though, is that NO martial art is "fast and ...


10

[NB: It is entirely likely that you will have no idea what I'm talking about here. Unless you have training in Bujinkan Ninpo Taijutsu, this will all be foreign to you, and this is purposely so. This is based on content from my own training manual, and is meant to aid students in their continued study of taijutsu and is not for everyone.] From the ...


10

As mentioned in this and other answers to that question one of the biggest things you can do to help your knees are progressively more difficult bodyweight squat variations or barbell/dumbbell squats (preferably with help of a trainer). These have a direct impact on the muscles that are responsible for stabilizing the knee, and done correctly they are ...


9

Not to sound terribly flippant or dismissive, but the best way to build up to doing a stance is to do the stance. When we perform a specific activity, we engage the muscles necessary for that activity. If you want, for instance, to effectively chop wood, then you should chop wood. This also serves the secondary purpose of building up your neural pathways to ...


8

Fair disclosure, I do not currently practice Shotokan, but I do practice Tae Kwon Do which has a front stance and requires 180 degree turns. There may be technical differences that I am unaware of. Drawing Into Center Typically, when executing a 180 turn there will be a drawing in to center to recover balance. This drawing in will compensate for any ...


8

Mainly for versatility and stability. In fencing your actions moving backwards are just as important as your actions moving forwards. A lot of people think of it as advancing on your opponent or retreating from them, but the point of those things isn't to capture or cede strip, it is to open and close distance. When you're fencing, you know your range and ...


8

Symmetric training is encouraged only at higher levels, and only by some coaches. The reason people mostly stick to their base stance in training is because "you need to learn to walk before you can run." In a complex sport like kickboxing, learning to "walk" takes a looong time. Some would say it takes an entire career. There's no sense in learning a combo ...


7

In my experience they are both a reverse punch, or gyaku zuki, which is done on the same side as the rearward leg and is one of the most basic foundation techniques taught in traditional karate styles. You should practice it stepping forwards and backwards, you never know when you are going to need it. In terms of co-ordination it is certainly harder to ...


7

There are a few things you might try. I will mention up front that this is from a Hapkido perspective, and if you have a variation of the stance that isn't quite the same this won't perfectly fit. The wushu horse stances I've seen are similar to ours, except that you tend to go much deeper than we usually emphasize. Let's look at the basic elements of a ...


7

In general you will do a lot of things in training that may not be directly applicable in a fight. This does not mean that they are not helpful. For example: what is the likely practical fighting application of a press up? This can also extend to Stances - some stances are designed to work your leg muscles and increase your balance. My experience comes ...


6

Postures encode a lot more than the obvious. Sometimes you'll find yourself in the middle of sparring, and you flow through a posture you've trained before. "Oh! I just did X! I didn't know I can use it like that!" Striking and blocking are the most obvious application. The next layer beneath that relates to what you can do when you grab or use joint locks. ...


6

In Shaolin Kung Fu, that is actually a combination of a few different moves. Forms will typically encode movements in combinations like this, for multiple reasons. One, it makes it easier to remember large amounts of moves, as forms were typically used to preserve techniques where handwritten manuals weren't sufficient. Also, when fighting in real life, you ...


6

I have a knee injury that I take care of by an excersize recomended by my orthopedic surgen. It's basically knee bend while hovering and moving your other leg around your body in different positions. Here you can see an instructional video of how to do it. The exercise will strengthen the muscles around the knee and the ankle and I've found that it helps me ...


6

How the heck can you walk in a ready stance down the street without the whole freaken place going 'ooooh, aaahhh'. I was trained in hand-to-hand combat by the IDF, not by a school or embassy, so my perspective may be different than that commonly taught. But I do use the same approach on my home street as I do in Jenin. There are two types of people who will ...


6

Freezing a movement and taking a still image of it is only useful if you can see the movement that came before it and the movement that comes after it. This image you've given us can be anything, because we can't see what came before and what's coming after it. If you're assuming that it represents a "fighting stance" or a position that you hold while ...


6

It has been a while since I fenced, but my understanding of the foot position is to increase stability during a deep thrust like the one shown below. Look at the leg slightly above the "C" of the fencer on the right. Were their foot in any other position, they would not be able to extend as much.


6

A lot of the power in a board break comes from the rotation/torque of the hips and legs to drive through the target. When you start with the same side forward, you have already eliminated most (if not all) of the hip rotation, unless you artificially rotate opposite your stance to then drive through. When you switch to the opposite foot forward, this gives ...


5

The technique depicted in this picture is called "mantis spies the cave" in 7 Star Praying mantis style.The right hand would be pulling an apponent into your space while the back of the left wrist is striking the face.The stance as you have said is Seven Star Stance and is used to signify a low sweep/stomp on the toe with heel/hooking into an apponents leg ...


5

It's not a starting position. It is a defence against a kick. The rear arm has caught the opponent's leg and it is hooked over it, the front hand is pushing him over backwards. You would need to see the full sequence of movements in the form to understand how the position is used. In karate the stance is called "manji-uke" and it has a direct equivalent in ...


5

I still remember the start of my very first fencing lesson at school. We had no swords, the instructor just paired is up and gave us a game. We had to touch each other with our right thumbs and shout whenever a touch landed. Five minutes later we were all laughing when he suddenly shouted "freeze!". We all did. "You are all standing with one arm out and one ...


5

Fighting will not solve your problem Learning how to fight will not help. It will take too long, land you in trouble with the law/school, and even if you succeed at becoming a fighter, all you achieve would be to turn yourself into a bully. Using weapons is an even worst idea! Leave knives, shives, and bats at home. You can cause serious harm to yourself ...


5

I prefer to be left hand forward, if I am hit in the right eye (and it swells/vision blurred etc.) I feel able to carry on. If I lose some vision in my left eye, I struggle much more, I have to turn my head to favour the right eye or even switch stance. Now given that the way I spar encourages kicks from the front leg and the jab, this all ties in heavily ...


4

This is an interesting question and I'd like to hear other's views on this. I once read an article about diabetic foot ulcers. The articles explained that some diabetic lose sensation of pain from their feet. Your feet will automatically adjust weight distribution based on biofeedback. This happens subconsciously. However, since some diabetics don't feel ...


4

I'm taking just this piece as the real question: In martial practice, how can the ankles be used to maximize benefit? Flexible ankles can significantly lower your stance (just bending them) in a much more natural way than trying to flex just your knees. To lower my stance I prefer to just focus on flexing my ankles and forget about the knees. When you ...


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