10

First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


10

I have had the occasion to spar with a national senior champion in karate (the guy is a little over 60). I am 30 years old and reasonnably fit as well, and I have 10+ years of practice of light contact karate (and a few in full contact). I wouldn't have been surprised for the guy to beat me because of superior sense of distance, timing, etc., but to my ...


9

First, I think your coach is wrong: weightlifting, properly done, is excellent for boxing. Second, I think your assumption that your legs are strong is wrong: running is not a particularly good way to develop leg strength compared to methods like barbell squats and deadlifts. Third, I think punching with weights in the hands or on the wrists is a bad idea ...


9

While it is essential that you get enough protein (and calories by the way) in your daily diet if you want to build muscle, it turns out that the timing of it is not important at all. Studies show that consuming protein right before, after, or during a weight-training workout doesn't gain you anything. This is despite what you've heard from weightlifters and ...


7

If BJJ is around, you should do BJJ. If grappling of another kind is around--wrestling, judo, SAMBO, et cetera--you should train that. But if nothing's available, you should do general physical preparation with a slight emphasis on BJJ's specific requirements. General Strength For instance, you'd want to do some kind of general strength (not bodybuilding!) ...


7

I took it quite literally by perform 50 of each kick daily. I saw improvements pretty quickly. Concentrate on the technique first. The flexibility will come with time.


7

From a physics perspective, one way to think about striking is impulse: To have an effective strike, you want to: Maximize mass. The normal advice is use your whole body to strike. This means that you do not want to punch simply by using your arm. Most styles deliver more mass behind a strike by rotating the hips. You can also step while striking. It helps ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


6

First, let's cover some basic context. Coordination of muscle is key It helps to have muscle, but... the real key is coordinating your muscles to work together to generate power. It's the same reason power lifters, who can undeniably lift and move great weight, don't make good baseball pitchers - the pitcher's ability is about coordination to generate ...


5

First of all, always be cautious when taking medical advice from the Internet. It's best to consult a doctor or physiotherapist before taking any actions. Any training where you train one particular muscle group may cause a muscle imbalance. That is why a good instructor will let you train various muscle groups. I'm no Taekwondo expert, but I don't think ...


5

Taekwondo instructors generally don't have the kind of knowledge you're talking about with regards to identifying muscle imbalance and improving it. For that, you need a personal trainer, someone who's knowledgeable in muscle building and proper exercise form. Taekwondo itself can develop some muscle imbalance, but in general this should be a pretty minor ...


5

The best way to train for martial arts is to do basic strength and conditioning alongside your chosen art. Basic conditioning means a mix of slower/longer runs with sprints. Basic strength training means fundamental resistance exercises (squats, lunges, deadlifts, pull-ups, pressing motions) using something like a barbell or dumbbells. This changes only ...


5

Yes, you can do amateur judo and bodybuilding together. The only major potential conflict that comes to mind is nutrition, and if you are not planning on cutting weight for amateur judo competitions (which I would recommend against), this is moot. To succeed in judo competition, you need both skill and strength. Make sure that you do not rely on strength ...


5

Yes, a trained 60 year-old can outfight an untrained 20 year-old, provided they maintain a healthy body. The average 60 year-old has already lost joint flexibility and mobility, which causes the body to start to become decrepit. A decrepit 60 year-old will always lose, even with training. You should have no illusions that this is easy. You are probably not ...


4

Aside from the strength training for grips, there's also certain technique involved in grips. For example, when you hold the right arm sleeve of your opponent, make sure you grab the part right under his elbow, and grab it tight, so he is unable to move his arm properly. At the same time it's hard for him to release his harm since you can control his arm ...


4

This in why symmetry is exercising is so important, but another factor that most people don't know about and which even martial arts schools that teach it, don't emphasize it's importance enough, is that of tendon strength. This is achieved through practicing your stances in a low position such as horse stance, front bow stances and other holding exercises....


4

First, it's normal to have hip soreness when beginning or restarting TKD. It's hard to say if you're causing yourself real injury, and as always I suggest you consult a physician if this is a real concern for you. Only you can really tell if the soreness/strain you're feeling is the normal soreness of training, or a sign of something serious. Monitor it ...


4

The trick is to move inside their range. Then it's a case of the bigger opponent having to fend off the smaller one because you're no longer in their striking range. Bruce Lee was a short fellow, and he used a combination of parries to move into range, then do things like backfist, rutts, uppercuts, tight hooks, overhead hook to get the job done. in ...


3

We are taught to practise in bjj to use a gi (uniform) you can hang it on something strong and practise pulling up if you do not have a gi to use for this excercise you can use a belt a martial art belt if possible. It helps to work your arms and you will be able to hold on with that grip when the opponent is resisting or moving.


3

You might have sleepy glutes. It's tough to say what's wrong or what will help without seeing the specific problem. But if your job is sedentary and you don't lift, I bet you have sleepy glutes and a weak back and legs, and fixing those would help. If you're not squatting and deadlifting, you need to start. Corrective exercises for posture, such as yoga, ...


3

i've always liked getting a bucket or small garbage can and filling it full of uncooked rice. you can do what we call rice grabs by jamming your fist into the rice while grabbing and releasing handfuls of rice. cheap and effective.


3

I would suggest doing kicks or your kata with a blindfold. This is usually much more difficult for older people as well, so if you are taking up the sport as an adult it can be very challenging and you'll get a few laughs out of it too!


3

Some techniques to improve balance include getting into a horse or front bow stance, slowly go through all of your kicks 10x, bringing the leg up to chamber, turning between 90-180 degrees slowly, extending your kick, turning back to the original position, then down to the original stance. Once you can do each kick up to 10x without losing your balance, you'...


3

Weight training can be beneficial, and some martial arts have a set of supplementary exercises (in Okinawa Goju Ryu we call it Hojo Undo) where you use tools like Chi'ishi (stone on a stick), Ishi-sashi (stone handles - ancient type of Kettle bell) and Nigiri Gamen (a couple of vases with necks in a size to fit a palm) for weight training. The advantage of ...


3

I think wrist weights if light enough doing shadowboxing is a fine idea.. These guys sound like bodybuilders and not boxers. The benefit of shadowboxing with wrist weights is that you'll be able to punch harder and it will develop strength against gravity trying to pull your hands away from guard position. You need to keep your hands up to protect your face....


3

After a judo class I'm more concerned with getting carbohydrate for glycogen depletion than I am with protein for muscle growth. A mix of both after class is fine. However, it's good to be skeptical of supplements and protein powders. They are above all a heavily-marketed consumer product for which advertising is trying to convince you that you need. Most ...


3

My martial art is boxing so my answer is from that perspective. Generally speaking you will want to do interval training to improve your cardiovascular stamina, and relatively light weights to build endurance in your arms, legs and core. Do this in rounds (3 minutes on 1 minute break) for 12-15 rounds. Some examples of what you can do include: Skipping. ...


3

Im in the same situation. For the past 6 months I've been hitting the gym for 5-6 days a week. My schedule looks like this: Mo: chest/shoulders Tu: arms/back We: legs/cardio Tu: same as Mo Fr: same as Tu Sa: same as We Every Tuesday and Friday evening I go to Wing Chun, a lesson is 2 hours, the first 25 minutes are hardcore cardio. My goals are working on ...


3

Your size and strength is relative. Skill level matters more, or the ability to acquire the skill and the skill of the opponent. Check out this you tube channel here , this guy is really good at explaining the concept of energy and power and it can be applied to multiple martial arts. Ultimately, its better to know a few techniques very well, instead of ...


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