10

First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


7

I took it quite literally by perform 50 of each kick daily. I saw improvements pretty quickly. Concentrate on the technique first. The flexibility will come with time.


6

I've covered this briefly in another answer, but splits don't help kicks. You should, in around 6 weeks be able to achieve your maximum kicking height doing dynamic stretches (leg swings). Each morning, do between 1 to 3 sets of 10 leg swings to the front, side and back. You don't need to force this or feel pain, just swing until you can't swing any ...


6

FWIW, after struggling similarly (and being given many different stretches and training methods to "fix" it) I had an MRI done and found out that my hips are formed in such a way that it is essentially impossible for me to kick above the mid-section from the side. No amount of training could ever overcome this. The only way to fix it would be to have my hip ...


6

Your master has been doing this stuff for several years (hopefully), so obviously he'll look better at it. It took me a good 6 months to be able to kick above my head and 2 years before I could do a full split. That didn't stop me from being successful in Taekwondo. You need more than just flexibility for high kicks though. You also need strong core muscles,...


5

You increase flexibility by stretching. You prevent injury through strength training. The great danger in splits, especially the middle split you need to work on for sidekicks is that if your cross-ligaments in your knee are week, all the strain will go there and you'll hyper-extend or tear them and have knee problems for the rest of your life. You need to ...


5

In my experience (~5 years of Shin Kyokushin in Tokyo - after ~25 years of other arts), Kyokushin tends to accept whatever you can make work in sparring, and doesn't care too much whether your mawashi geri has a healthy dose of maegeri in there, even in gradings. But individual instructors and examiners may vary. Of the kicks in the video you link, several ...


4

The science on static stretching in the warm up is not settled. The NY Times has a short article based on a review of stretching studies that points to static stretching in the warm up being neutral or beneficial. So most fitness experts currently advise against static stretches before exercise. But now a comprehensive new review of decades’ worth of ...


4

Trying to achieve a full split in just two months is an optimistic goal; I would expect it to take longer. my inner thighs and outer hips pain a lot. Immediately I would make a distinction between discomfort and pain. You should feel discomfort, but if you are feeling pain then you need to stop and re-evaluate what you are doing. Having discomfort in ...


4

First, it's normal to have hip soreness when beginning or restarting TKD. It's hard to say if you're causing yourself real injury, and as always I suggest you consult a physician if this is a real concern for you. Only you can really tell if the soreness/strain you're feeling is the normal soreness of training, or a sign of something serious. Monitor it ...


4

Here's the thing about shoulder pain: it might be a muscle strain, it might be partial tendon tear, it might be a pinched nerve, it might be bursitis, it might be a lot of things. Now, depending what the problem is, massage might help, rest might help, strengthening might help, stretching might help, ergonomics might help... hell, surgery might help. On ...


3

There are many possible causes for this roadblock to your stretching improvement. Firstly, I would recommend a stretching program, not just a drill, that you do regularly outside of class several times a week. Tom Kurz book Stretching Scientifically can help with that. The key is to use effective stretching tools beyond static, passive stretches. Secondly, ...


3

Muscles, Tendons, Reflex Reactions So, here's the important thing to know about stretching. Your body has natural reflexes in the muscle spindles which causes them to act as "brakes" to slow down a movement if it's being moved too fast for what the muscle expects. It's a way to prevent damage to the joints. So the point of stretching is that it resets ...


3

Weakness It could be that your hip flexor was tired or even inflamed, since you're not used to raising your leg to the front. If this is the case, recovery and subsequent training over several weeks should resolve the issue. Inflexibility Though you can do a split to the front and back, maybe your dynamic flexibility is poor. Static flexibility does not ...


3

I would suggest doing kicks or your kata with a blindfold. This is usually much more difficult for older people as well, so if you are taking up the sport as an adult it can be very challenging and you'll get a few laughs out of it too!


3

Some techniques to improve balance include getting into a horse or front bow stance, slowly go through all of your kicks 10x, bringing the leg up to chamber, turning between 90-180 degrees slowly, extending your kick, turning back to the original position, then down to the original stance. Once you can do each kick up to 10x without losing your balance, you'...


3

I know this is an old question but I'm relatively new to this site and thought I could help. I can do a 180 degree split if it's front to back but it's still at times difficult to kick an opponent in the head with a roundhouse. What has helped me, believe it or not, is yoga, specifically a pose called pigeon. (source: co.uk) What this does is help get ...


3

As a brown belt you have already got a number of years of stretching behind you - did you notice any improvement that was related to that stretching (and wasn't a result of co-ordination improvement)? I would suggest that due to this being a skeletal issue your muscles will already have adapted to it - while you may be able to improve your flexibility there ...


2

Asking the Internet for advice on something like this isn't the best approach, because we don't know enough about you and your limits. The best thing would be for you to find a physiotherapist, or other sports therapist, who can spend time developing a scheme to help you (and only you!). With regard to your instructor repeatedly mentioning your poor ...


2

I'll assume you're already doing a good amount of stretching for hip and thigh muscles. The next thing to work with is core muscles - tight quadratus lumborum, psoas, and serratus muscles can also impact getting your leg height. Then beyond that is strengthening your core muscles because those impact how high you can get your leg up and hold it. Beyond ...


2

Background, in case you're curious, I'm a second dan black belt training for competitive sparring. So, it's my opinion that there are two things that you should work on to improve finesse. One of them is flexibility, but I'm sure you already know this. Have a solid stretching routine, and stick with it. The most important places to stretch are your hips and ...


2

Full split in 2 months? Don't be so hard on yourself, it can take years. Then consider, is there really ever a need in a combat situation to kick that high? Seems like a flowery waste of energy to me.


2

Muscle, Tendon, reflex responses The body has a natural reflex response when a part of the body is moved too fast - it tightens muscles to reflexively serve as "brakes", to slow down the movement. This is specifically a response to try to prevent joint damage. This is a spinal reflex - the nerves send a response to the spine and the reflex is sent back ...


2

As requested on another thread - commonly used techniques that should be avoided/the methods of old. DO NOT DO THESE tearing the muscles and holding them out to heal "in place" - several ageing instructors I know were subjected to this treatment in the 60s and 70s, tie one leg to a wall bar, someone grabs the other leg, pulls it round into the splits ...


2

I'm no doctor and if you want medical advice on the safety of stretching with a pulley you're asking in the wrong place, but it seems to me that as long as you're not feeling burning pain from excessive stretching, and in your stretching position you have enough control to ease back on the stretch if that were to start, all's good. Because when using a ...


2

I would add, per your details, you should focus on warming up. You didn't say if you warmed up, and you didn't say when you stretched or how you stretch - the devil is always in the details. So perhaps you are warming up; but stretching cold muscles, or using the wrong stretches, is a disaster in the making and often contributes to pain during or after ...


2

This could be a ligament-stretching issue rather than a muscle-stretching issue, which is why it doesn't feel like stiffness. There are 2 stretches that can help with this: One is a partnered-stretch, the other you can do on your own. For the partnered stretch: kneel down, knees and feel apart, with your body and arms out in front. Your partner puts ...


2

You are at an advanced stage of stretching, given the numbers you provide. However, stretching does not increase your capability to stretch! Think of your muscles like putty. When you roll it so that it gets longer and longer, what happens to the mass of putty? Yes: it thins out. This is not good for martial arts. As an example of what I'm saying, try ...


1

Using a stretching aid to assist a stretch is fine as long as you take your time and don't use too much force (YMMV). In my experience, the very best aid for achieving progress in stretching (for limberness) is to perform a solid warm-up routine before hand. Achieving a significant increase in limberness is something that takes time. If you push yourself ...


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