10

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program initially included an element called Body Hardening. It involved hitting the location of primary nerves. The Radial and Ulna nerves, Femoral and Sciatic nerves, and abdominal strikes for the Celiac Plexus. The result was that, after repeated impact over a long period of time, the nerve would become damaged, such that ...


8

It sounds like you're talking about the scientific form of pressure points (as opposed to pseudoscience involving "chi meridians"), namely spots on the body which allow for direct stimulation of nerves and muscles to cause a great deal of pain or sometimes even muscle paralysis. As with defending any vulnerable part of your body, the key principles are a) to ...


8

Stop planning your eventual wall of black belts and go get a blue belt in BJJ or a brown belt in judo or join a SAMBO school or join a wrestling club. Worry about integrating your grappling into your striking after you have some grappling skill. Try a class at each of the grappling schools in your area, pick the one with the highest quality teachers and ...


7

From a physics perspective, one way to think about striking is impulse: To have an effective strike, you want to: Maximize mass. The normal advice is use your whole body to strike. This means that you do not want to punch simply by using your arm. Most styles deliver more mass behind a strike by rotating the hips. You can also step while striking. It helps ...


7

I don't know about in English, but there certainly is in Japanese. In Shorinji Kempo we have different words for every kind of time difference between the attacker moving and the defender moving. Go no sen: If you wait for the attack, then block or dodge, then counter after the attack has finished. (hard initiative or machi no sen waiting initiative) ...


7

BJJ inherits this treatment of striking in rolling from judo. Strikes were removed from judo randori (free play) because Kano could not figure out a way to train them safely. Only relatively safe techniques were used in randori to allow full-force practice. Striking and defending against striking were relegated to kata (prearranged exercises). The basic ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


6

First, let's cover some basic context. Coordination of muscle is key It helps to have muscle, but... the real key is coordinating your muscles to work together to generate power. It's the same reason power lifters, who can undeniably lift and move great weight, don't make good baseball pitchers - the pitcher's ability is about coordination to generate ...


6

You can make such a list, but there will always be nontrivial disagreements about what the list excludes and whether things on the list are the same. You could imagine making a list by taking the union of every martial art's striking technique set and then eliminating duplicates. But no one would agree on what the duplicates are, or what the criteria for ...


6

First off, that image is a bad example of the technique: When using this (which karate would call "koken"), my wrist is bent at about 90°, instead of the 60° shown - the hand needs to be pulled further out of the way, which will require further stretching. One of my students (a somewhat hyperactive 6th kyu) is able to get the wrist bent past 100°! The ...


5

The same source text you're quoting mentions the use of Uberlauffen or overrunning as defense against low threats. The idea is to use a Scheitelhau (or a similarly executed thrust) to strike before you get hit by the opponent while removing the target. Your blade in the opponent's body would then prevent follow-up attacks. The argument used there is that ...


5

I would suggest you to look into a fencing book or the www and the terms parry & riposte. A parry is a fencing bladework maneuver intended to deflect or block an incoming attack. (from wiki) Riposte is an offensive action with the intent of hitting one's opponent, made by the fencer who has just parried an attack. (from wiki) You may name it ...


5

Generally it is the force that is important - not the energy but. There's a simple misunderstanding here, in that looking at E = 1/2 mv2 Let's carefully look at the units - mass * velocity * velocity Now velocity is distance / time So we end up with (mass * distance2)/time2 So we can see that by halving the time it takes to deliver a technique - we get ...


5

The effect of the spot you indicate is known colloquially as a "dead leg". You can strike this spot without any great danger, it simply induces a throbbing pain and a temporary loss of control to the muscles in the area. The description in Quora: Stand erect, and relaxed, with your hands hanging at your sides and your thumbs resting along the side ...


5

People who become MMA fighters usually start out learning one style first. As the sport has progressed over the years, teaching people how to mix different styles together has changed. Now, with more experienced teachers, students benefit as techniques and teaching methods evolve. Boxing My first combat style was boxing. I was trained to fight with left foot ...


5

The kiai, kihap, or "shout" serves many different purposes. It can help provide focus by association (you shout when you strike in practice, so shouting in combat helps you land that prototype strike). It can help provide power (I don't know the mechanism exactly, but shouting or grunting often helps people exert more effort, something to do with ...


4

Boxing is probably the most effective "real world" martial art you could do. Especially if you cross-train in greco-roman wrestling. Bruce Lee said something to the effect that you learn more in one year of boxing and wrestling than 10 years of eastern martial arts.


4

From a non-HEMA perspective: you want to minimize the time it takes to defend the current attack, while maintaining a position that can still adapt for your own attacks or to defend potential future attacks. Whether footwork evasion or a block will be faster depends on where your sword is when the attack begins. If your sword is high, an attempt to block ...


4

If we think about things completely in the abstract, slipping the leg while striking the head is a better option: because you're attacking and defending in the same motion it is virtually impossible for your opponent to react and counter your strike. By targeting your leg, your opponent has robbed themselves of a lot of reach, meaning you can usually easily ...


4

In Taekwondo you have the push kick, miro chagui. The front push kick is similar to the front snap kick, but the knee is raised a little higher to produce a slight downward and frontward movement, pushing away the opponent. The push kick is frequently used in sparring, and is also a simple and effective technique for self defense situations.


4

Counter attack From the glossary of the International Fencing Federation : Counter-attack : A simple or coumpound counter-offensive action on an opponents attack. It is sometimes executed while stepping forward, sometimes by retreating or by ducking, sometimes with a half-lunge or an extension of the guard. From Wikipedia's Glossary of Fencing : ...


4

As long as everyone is silent, I'll add my two cents. When using your knees to hit your opponent's body, you may go in two ways: Your opponent is much stronger than you. You cannot pull his body towards you to make it more vulnerable to your knees. In such situations, frequent and light hits may be an option - at least it will complicate your opponent'...


4

For the sake of answering, I'm going to assume you're asking "When is the best time to kiai in order to maximize effect?" Leaving aside any psychological benefit, the physiological effect of kiaiing is to tense the diaphragm and firm up the connection between the upper and lower body. Simply put, if there's "wiggle" in your core, a punch ...


4

OK, lets get a little science-y. According to a study on biomechanics of the collarbone fracture, average axial (along the length) load before fracture was slightly over 1500 newtons. For reference, 9000 newtons is roughly equal to the downward pull of 1 ton. According to this article on Livescience, a human can generate ~ 5000 newtons with a punch, 9000N ...


4

This is similar to the effect when forcefully exhaling during weightlifting - the forceful exhalation (different to the Valsalva manoeuvre, which is also employed in some situations) creates not only a rigidity in the abdomen which allows for more efficient force transfer, but also increases muscle tension globally. This is useful for the martial arts ...


4

Just wanted to preface this, I've been sparring since around age 6, and all testings require a 1v2 to 1v5 versus the national team members, so please take what I say with a grain of salt. Whenever you're attacked on the street, your first priority should be getting out of there. Most attacks can be random, after provoking some drunk guy, but practice fight ...


3

Combining the terms "Martial Art" and "avoiding head strikes" is a tall order. The two are mutually exclusive, honestly. The head and its surrounds are excellent and strategic targets in all arts martial. That said, there are plenty of so-called martial arts that reduce their focus on head strikes, primarily for liability reasons, or out of ignorance. Tae ...


3

In my experience, there are a few reasons why professional/trained fighters do not feel pain as much as a normal person. Higher pain tolerance They are constantly taking hits and their bodies have become accustomed to pain. Fighters know in which situations pain is unavoidable and they may have developed a different response to it. Also, by mentally ...


3

You may want to look into some styles of escrima, kali, or penjak silat. These tend to have a lot of striking with some use of grappling and locks. These also tend to deal with weapons (knives, sticks) as well as multiple opponents, which are extra bits that are critical to self defense that often get missed in sports-focused training. Boxing gives you an ...


3

As of the movement itself, this can be the outcome of several mindsets and tactics. Therefore, I will use the Japanese terms that describe a certain tactics/mindset while fighting rather than the relative movements of the opponents as they appear. In contemporary Japanese martial arts, it is "sen" (or "sen no sen"). From Tadao Otaki & Donn F. Draeger (...


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