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8

I won't get too academic about it, so I'll give you the layman's summary. And for the purpose of comparison, I'll emphasize the difference between Shotokan karate and Taekwondo, since Taekwondo derives from Shotokan directly. The differences increase greatly if you're talking about all of karate vs. Taekwondo. There are just too many branches of karate to ...


6

First, the science: https://rollingaroundbjj.com/fights-end-up-on-ground/ That article looked at 383 street fights which were available on Youtube. Never mind the fact that in order to make it onto Youtube in the first place, maybe something spectacular had to happen, or maybe it was just a stupid looking fight. Who knows. So the data set might be a tad ...


5

Yes. Contrary to what the average "expert" on swords and Japanese swordsmanship will tell you online (along with their obligatory mentions to Miyamoto Musashi who everyone obligatorily must mention whenever dual-wielding Japanese swords is discussed even though in his own book he clearly states using two swords is nothing new in Japan and there ...


5

Your plan does not account for messy realities of life, anyone you may meet, or anything you will learn along the way. Although most everyone has a preconceived idea of what training martials arts will do for them, these ideas often do not match up with reality. Arbitrary time scales Although you can request to be taught in a shortened one-year period, this ...


3

I like the previous suggestion of Capoeira, because it does emphasize physical fitness, does not involve contact during sparring, and can be practiced alone. But as I said in one of the comments, I think it can be pretty intimidating for a beginner to begin taking Capoeira classes, because it does involve a lot of techniques that seem advanced. To someone ...


3

Re-calibrate your expectations. Nobody invented throwing. Wrestling is pre-human. Mammals wrestle as both bonding and male-dominance-hierarchy behavior. Monkeys wrestle. Lions wrestle. The codification of wrestling and throwing is human, but still pre-historic. From the indigenous wrestling cultures that still exist we can infer that prehistoric people ...


3

Here are a small list of styles to look into. They're all hand dominated and have forms: Wing Chun kung-fu Southern Praying Mantis kung-fu Hung Gar kung-fu Pentjak Silat Taiji (Tai Chi) Many other styles would qualify. For example, I listed a few southern styles of kung-fu up there. There are a lot more southern styles than that. And they do tend to be ...


3

I don't think Tai Chi has many of these. It does have a few low knee bends but even these seem to be comparatively rare. It is also very form based.


3

This should just be a comment under Macaco Brancos answer, but my reputation is to low. So I write it as a full answer: In your own comment, you write that you think about learning Ju Jutsu. It will probably depend on the style and your teacher, but in 3 years of training I never even held a sword. When using weapons we never even consider anything beyond ...


3

There are several different martial arts styles the practice swordwork with the katana. If you're looking to do sports sparring, I'd advise Kendo. If you're looking for something closer to historical teaching, and with unarmed combat mixed in, you're looking for Kenjutsu. That is sometimes taught on its own, and is sometimes part of another style such as ...


3

First, I practice judo and not BJJ, so understand what I can and cannot answer with knowledge and where my potential biases may be. Second, this is a common way to start an internet flame war. With that in mind, I will still try to answer this objectively. So is Judo better for self-defense while BJJ is better for a controlled sports-setting? No. ...


2

One useful approach to this problem comes from Patrick McCarthy, who (as far as I know) coined the term "habitual acts of physical violence" (HAPV). This was a good tool for him to persuade practitioners of Japanese, Okinawan, and Korean karate that stepping-lunge reverse punches are a unrealistic and unproductive way to train. McCarthy lists 36 such HAPVs, ...


2

I usually don't like to answer questions like these, because they are mostly opinion based, but for the sake of giving you the information that you need, I will answer with as little opinion as possible. Well, let me start of with this. It is a resource that was provided to me in an answer to one of my questions. Essentially, it is a study of hundreds of ...


2

The questions asks which martial art to start with if the focus is on self-defense: Boxing, Taekwondo, or Judo. Well first, I'd like you to read what I wrote in my answer at the following link: why a perfect expert and trained taekwondo player or martial artist fear fights? Read that answer and read the links that it also listed. You might also want to look ...


1

You're at the age when you're going to start getting injuries from hard styles. Here I'm not talking about sparring, but muscle pulls, joint problems, etc. (For this reason, hard styles are usually emphasized for younger practitioners.) If you're still open to Chinese internal styles, you might see if there's a good Bagua instructor in your area. Same ...


1

I know I always throw it out as a suggestion when people are looking for martial arts, but Capoeira fits what you are looking for. While individual schools vary, in general it is very much about the art and culture (and music!) as it is martial movements. It's definitely good exercise, although it's also possible to do it more slowly, especially as you're ...


1

I would personally recommend boxing kickboxing or muay thai, as you can practice on a bag it is a great form of cardio. However, in my experience, they do not highlight the "art" aspect of it as much as they do the sport. Aikido is something that you can look into as it is more spiritual that boxing but faster paced than tai chi. Lastly, consider ...


1

No. Nope. Definitely not. No. No. Just.... No. If you're going to dual wield anything in your off-hand, use a buckler. Manga, anime, movies and video game tropes are worthless in actual combat. Every warrior culture wielding melee arms throughout history have always, without fail gravitated to pole-arms (re: spears) and shields. The republic Roman army did ...


1

This is not a question of style, but of human decency and staying within the bounds of law. Maximum damage instead of necessary force only is both immoral and illegal. Every responsible instructor will tell you that. Apart from that, it is impossible to design a useful training when focusing on maximal damage only. Either it will lack resistance or produce ...


1

I follow Hayashi ha shito ryu and did classical shito ryu for a long time. Sensei Hayashi studied with Mabuni himself, but also went to Okinawa to study traditional styles. He studied matsubayashi shorin ryu under Shoshin Nagamine and also learned ryuei ryu directly from the Nakaima family. In Hayashi ha we have many katas from the shorin ryu school, which ...


1

The joint on final travel is very weak so mechanical advantage of above the average person is useless .The pain tolerance maybe it's higher because of this ability but if you twist the trapped arm or feet the pain will come . Because immobilisation came before applying the pain techniques this double joint feature is no guarantee to escape but will probably ...


1

Indeed he is a unique fighter. Roy Jones Jr is the closest fighter to Prince Naz in terms of boxing style. IMO, Roy and Naz are undefeated in their prime but got carried away with their success.


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