32

Emotions in general are detrimental to your sparring. Usually when I have seen this said to a student it is not because we want you to get angry, but that you are sparring as if you are afraid. If you are afraid of striking your opponent you become SLOW and hesitant. Remember here that you should only ever spar willingly (never spar if you don't want to) ...


20

Mind Maps The BJJ community is big on mind maps, which are close but not an exact match in your search for ontologies. For instance, Aesopian has this one: This is not surprising, since the entire concept that set BJJ apart from judo was the idea of an inexorable flowchart: Takedown Pass guard Mount (using a broad definition of the term--not necessarily ...


20

See the translation of Taekwondo entry in Japanese Wikipedia. According to this article, in 1940s during the Japanese rule of Korean Peninsula, Karate (空手) was taking hold under the name Kongsoodo (공수도, 空手道) and Tangsoodo (당수도, 唐手道). To backtrack on these namings, we need to understand the origin of Karate. Sakukawa Kanga (佐久川寛賀) from Ryukyu Kingdom (today'...


16

This is a common reason people get into martial arts. You're probably going to hear a lot of people tell you that's not a good use of martial arts, out of some general sense of "violence is wrong" paternalism. What I will say, instead, is that not everyone's bullying situation is the same. One person might punch a bully in the nose and be left alone from ...


16

Absolutely. I was 27ish when I took my first lessons, and was so inflexible that when I sat on the floor and stretched my leg out I could only reach halfway down my shin towards my foot. And the splits? Fuhgeddaboutit. At 14 you'll also have an inclination towards trying hard and doing your best, unlike, sadly, many kids under 12. TKD, probably like any ...


14

Some of the answers on the following questions may be helpful: What qualifies a school or business as a legitimate martial arts system? How important is lineage when it comes to credibility or trustworthiness? What characteristics should I look for in a sensei? Some of the danger signs I would look for in what people call a "Belt Factory": Either ...


14

Yes, it's possible, but if you focus on that you're likely to be disappointed. Most people who start (any martial art, or anything else difficult for that matter) tend to drop out after a short time, or simply not have the time or natural talent to rise to elite competitive levels. And that's ok. It seems a little early to be caring about national level ...


14

What works for your sensei might not work from you. He is teaching you, what had worked for him. For some, they use anger for the aggressiveness it brings. Anger dominates certain opponents. And in the case of draw, the more aggressive fighter that attacks more (whether contact or not) is usually declared the winner. But anger does not work for everyone. It ...


14

While tigers can be considered savage in some sense, as in "uncivilized" or "fierce", they certainly don't get angry. When they are attacking, they have a goal in mind ("kill this prey to satisfy my hunger") and they use their instinct and physical might to reach that goal, there is no emotion. When they are defending themselves, they again use their ...


13

In short, grading every 3 months as a lower Gup is fairly normal. You will begin to be able to tell if you're in a "belt factory" if you look to the higher Gups and Black Belts and wonder how on Earth they have X Belt. I'm an instructor for an ITF-based Taekwon-do school and the approach that our umbrella organisation follows is to have gradings four times ...


13

The primary change is that daredevil / suicide moves now lose all interest. Jumping up and hitting the top of the head Spinning kicks, in particular the spinning hook/reverse/something kick to the head super-lunge-punch All these moves, and more, are now begging for punishment much more than before, when a judge might decide to call a point and stop the ...


13

Sorry I'm not able to give a more academic answer to your question. As a former black belt in TKD and a bit of a martial arts history buff, I took an interest in this question myself at one point in my past. Here are my observations and thoughts on the matter. Taekwondo forms used to be entirely from Shotokan karate. This comes about because many Koreans ...


13

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


13

Anger is definitely not a prerequisite for sparring, specially since angry people tend to neglect their technique, but I think that you might have misinterpreted what your sensei told you. A tiger hunts with everything it has, full concentration, full physical force and deadly precision, since they hunt completely alone. Keeping this in mind and the fact ...


12

First, bear in mind that this will differ from dojang to dojang. Depending on your association (WTF or ITA for example) there may be a list of techniques you will have to master for each belt. If you are not affiliated with an association, your teacher will have a checklist of things he wants you to learn before each belt. Ask your teacher what the ...


12

I'll second some of the responses here and say that unless you're gifted, you probably won't be able to avoid confusing Kyokushin with Taekwondo. The stances, the techniques, the level of force, what counts as "legal" or "illegal" contact, etc. will all be different enough that it will drive your instructors crazy trying to correct you all the time. You're ...


12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


11

I have been in TKD and Martial arts for over 40 years. I have a master rank in TKD. I also have a traumatic brain injury. This happens very seldom but the head gear in any sport does not protect you from concussion as the violent movement of the head causes the injury. I learned a long time ago to move my head away from a punch or kick. This minimizes the ...


11

Your kid is 7 years old. And he's just a beginner, approaching intermediate level. Of course he's not going to be good at stuff. Whether it's sparring, forms, breaking, recalling terminology, leading the class, etc. It's to be expected. This is absolutely nothing to worry about. Trust me, he will improve. Your main concern is about him wanting to quit ...


11

Of course you should quit! From what you said, you are neither having fun nor learning anything. I know you are young but your time is valuable. There is no point in wasting your time with people who do not appreciate you and refuse to teach you. The shame is theirs. Find another martial art class to go to, one where you can learn, grow, and have fun. If ...


11

If you want to find out if your art has value, you'll need to go test it under conditions that make sense for its context (don't expect the sword fighting art to work best in a grappling ring, etc.) and see if you feel it's enough. However, the bigger issue you're looking at, is toxic male behavior (women don't really do this). These are guys trying to ...


10

The situation of TKD is very similar to that of Shotokan karate (and indeed since TKD comes mostly from Shotokan karate). In Shotokan, you will occasionally see some weapons being taught, such as the nunchaku, tonfa, sai, and sword. But those weapons aren't in Shotokan's syllabus. Each instructor had to learn them from someone who knows Okinawan or Japanese ...


10

Former black belt in Taekwondo here. This turned out to be a pretty long explanation. Sorry about that. But in this case, I wanted to educate rather than just inform. Judging by the question, this sounds like a young student and someone just beginning Taekwondo or karate. Back when I was 13 years old just beginning Taekwondo, I would have loved for someone ...


10

The question asks which is more effective: Doing MMA or doing multiple different martial arts. There are a couple of different interpretations about what is meant by "effective" in this context, however. First, it can refer to how well all the different styles of martial arts are integrated into a cohesive system whereby all the techniques work together and ...


10

First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


10

There are several reasons, but in my opinion, they are somewhat of a cop-out - and yet a relief. Keep in mind, getting into the Olympics is a herculean task: there needs to be a federation representing 75 countries on 4 continents (for men) and 40 countries on 3 continents (for women), anti-doping policies, "modern appeal", media interest, promote gender ...


9

In ITF Taekwon-do, the coloured belts are numbered from 10th kup (also gup) to 1st kup. Black belt grades are numbered from 1st degree (also dan) to 9th degree. In the organisation I'm a member of (P.U.M.A, in the UK), the colours used are: 10th: White 9th: Yellow stripe 8th: Yellow 7th: Green stripe 6th: Green 5th: Blue stripe 4th: Blue 3rd: Red stripe ...


9

The Kukkiwon splits all the countries in the world into two categories, depending on whether that Member National Association (MNA) for the World Taekwondo Federation (WTF) in that country controls over 70% of Taekwondo groups and instructors. Those that do are considered to be in the "1st Category" and recommendations can only be made by the President of ...


9

It's a delicate balancing act; if you don't push and encourage your son, he might not achieve his full potential. If you do push and encourage him, you may end up putting him off martial arts altogether (which is obviously a bad thing, but perhaps even more so for you and your son!) Could your son attend both lessons? That way he would have one class where ...


9

Special thanks to @JohnP and @Fuzzyboots for an interesting discussion in the chat (Link to the Open Roda discussion). The answer is, for me anyway, is IF there is any doubt that your child is not receiving all he/she can from a Taekwondo school, pull them out and send them to another school. Do not get caught up in the titles, belt levels etc. Do what is ...


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