16

Absolutely. I was 27ish when I took my first lessons, and was so inflexible that when I sat on the floor and stretched my leg out I could only reach halfway down my shin towards my foot. And the splits? Fuhgeddaboutit. At 14 you'll also have an inclination towards trying hard and doing your best, unlike, sadly, many kids under 12. TKD, probably like any ...


8

The topic pertains to an obscure rule in World Taekwondo rules regarding checking kicks with the knee. The rules state: http://worldtaekwondo.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/WT-Competition-Rules-Interpretation-Manchester-May-15-2019.pdf Article 14 ("Prohibited acts and penalties") Section 4.1.9 ("Butting or attacking with the knee") "...


8

I won't get too academic about it, so I'll give you the layman's summary. And for the purpose of comparison, I'll emphasize the difference between Shotokan karate and Taekwondo, since Taekwondo derives from Shotokan directly. The differences increase greatly if you're talking about all of karate vs. Taekwondo. There are just too many branches of karate to ...


8

This is normal for Taekwondo. Aggression is far preferred to defense. You don't get points by waiting for them to come to you. And you don't get points for blocks. So TKD's main game is to always be on the attack. At least when continuous sparring, not when 3 point limit sparring. I talked a little about this in some of my previous answers. First, in the ...


5

You're probably referring to the "half turning kick" (sometimes called just the "turning kick", "twisting kick", or "45 degree kick") which goes by various Korean names, depending on your organization: "bit chagi", "paldung chagi", or a "bandal chagi". You can see it here: https://www....


5

Yes. Without a question. I'm a Taekwon-Do instructor, and we have students join us from 5 years old through to 40/50+. It's a bit clichéd but you're really never too old to start, like some others have said as long as you're eager to learn and you try hard, you'll do fine. I started Karate in my late teens when I joined university, and then Taekwondo in ...


4

Yep! I'm going to back this up with a few points: Learning anything, not only martial arts, is always best to be started at a young age. 14 is the age that many people would consider to be one of the best times to start because your brain is still in development. It doesn't matter what martial art your talking about, I have met sever people that started ...


4

Yes, it's fine (good, even!) to start at age 14. It's a common concern from beginners that they do not have enough strength or fitness or flexibility to start martial arts. Do not worry about this; you train martial arts to acquire these attributes and improve yourself. It's never too late to train to improve yourself.


4

I'm not involved in Taekwondo (so, answer from Taekwondo master should definitely be the best and accepted here), but the question is a bit wider, I think. Short answer: from my opinion it is OK. Results you gain depend on your amount of hard work and believing in yourself, not your age. Of course, it is easier to learn in your early ages - because of that ...


4

The average age of medalists in Olympic Taekwondo is 24 years old for males, 23 years old for females. The medalists go up to over age 30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863920/ The average age of the Olympic Taekwondo team for the U.S. is 27. There are competitors and medalists who are over age 30. No, you don't need to have started Taekwondo ...


3

He is moving quite slowly and favours a front kick. You can bet he will use a front kick against you. So train to deal with that.


3

The question asks what's the best way to get back into shape for Taekwondo after an extended period of inactivity in Taekwondo. Also, what to do about muscle that has been gained since then. While I do think some people benefit from working by themselves to get themselves back in shape before returning to active classes, I think it's almost always better to ...


3

As per the provided link, there's a number of factors going on. First of all, a kiai is as much about a forceful exhalation and a focus of purpose as it is actually yelling. Many of the fighters do just that grunting or exhaling on a heavy strike. One of the other purposes of a kiai is to startle the opponent. In the Octagon, most fighters are prepared for ...


2

There are two different schools of thought on each of two subjects in martial arts. The first subject is To what Extent do we allow out practitioners to be Injured? Some styles such as Maui Thai are happy for every practitioner's career to be short. They fight a few times, generally get badly injured one way or another and then become coaches for the ...


2

At it's most basic it is a strike to the groin, but, probably not with the fingers. It's probably a slap to the groin whilst protecting your face/ body with the other hand. Imagine someone has thrown a straight punch at you (R Hand) or has tried to grab you. You might step forward with your left foot, whilst slipping the punch or grab. So your left hand is ...


2

Absolutely! I was 14 when I started martial arts. Originally, I trained in karate for three years, but I moved to Taekwondo at 17 and earned my 1st Dan at 21. That was some 30 years ago now, and I still train. My eldest daughter started at age 12. What really matters is your attitude and commitment rather than your age.


2

I started at 13. I got reasonably good before I gave it up around 16. So yes, you absolutely can. You might not be able to do the splits like the little kids can, but it won't stop you getting good, and you're still young enough that you can easily build decent flexibility. By the way, our instructor was female, and she was awesome. Some people are just ...


2

You can start Taekwondo at 14 or like me at 28. Your flexibility will improve with time and it will depend on your work not your age. Have seen people in their 60s being better than someone in their 10s or 20 not because they have been practicing for a long time but because of their commitment to improve a little every time. You will see the benefits and ...


2

The questions asks which martial art to start with if the focus is on self-defense: Boxing, Taekwondo, or Judo. Well first, I'd like you to read what I wrote in my answer at the following link: why a perfect expert and trained taekwondo player or martial artist fear fights? Read that answer and read the links that it also listed. You might also want to look ...


2

Here is a design I created in the 1990s using CAD software. I have used it for decades to break 1x12 common pine boards in stacks of 1 to 10. Enjoy, -Peter http://world.std.com/~pce/holder1a.ps


2

Leg defenses DO exist in Taekwon Do. https://youtu.be/IXIzWaQpRlQ Now, why don't people commonly use them in sparring or self defense? That's a question that deserves an answer. BTW Side rising AND front rising kick are also blocks. In my case, I don't use leg defenses, simply because, I wasn't taught how to use them in sparring or self defense. They were ...


2

When joining a religious movement or sect in certain east Asian cultures it is common for acolytes to receive a new religious name. 의암 ("Eui-Am", lit. "Righteous Rock") appears to have been such a name given to Son Byong-Hi when he joined the Donghak movement, either when he was initiated or possibly when he was ordained as the 3rd Great ...


1

I would say there is a difference between good technique and properly performing high kicks. You can develop good technique practicing with lower kicks. For example, a side kick involves specific movements, from chambering to the final leg extension. These technical movement can be trained at the height your comfortable with. That could be at knee height. ...


1

According to this link, "seong-sa" breaks down into "sage" (seong) and "teacher" (sa). Although it's usually translated as a "grandmaster": https://sooshimkwan.blogspot.com/2011/01/instructor-master-and-grandmaster.html?m=1 And according to everything else I've read, it appears that "Eui-Am" is just a pen ...


1

I started at 14 and continued throughout high school. I don't know how much it helped me learn to fight, but it started me in a habit of being physically active that's lasted me into my 30s and served me well. Plus it's cool to be able to say I'm a black belt, even if I probably can't kick past my waist anymore :)


1

Definitely give it a go, if you enjoy it and you're willing to work, you can do well. I started in my mid twenties and I've competed in patterns, sparring and breaking at countless competitions, winning plenty of medals along the way. I'm also now an instructor at my local club so I can help teach the new students coming through. You are never too old, ...


1

China has a historic pattern of suppressing effective martial arts, and sponsoring less combat-effective ones. For example, from this article: But the Emei Style was already dead by the time the Red Guards showed up. Throughout Chinese history, governments have routinely supported, and then cracked-down upon, martial arts. In times of war, martial artists ...


1

You not only need flexibility but muscle strength. In order to practice this, you can do following exercises: hold straight as high as you can then swing it higher, do this 50 times each leg. hold straight for 10 seconds each leg, once you get better, 20 seconds and so on. kick as high as you can then hold 3 seconds, and this 10 times (or more if you can) ...


1

Ok, I added my own attempt at Bunkai earlier..but...I think.i prefer this one. https://youtu.be/Oekt93vyn5M OK let me attempt to describe what's happening in the video and then show how it applies to patterns like Joong-Gun that have BOTH palm upward blocks and pressing blocks. Application 1: Now, this video ALSO suggests that recent changes to the alignment ...


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