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11

Every individual muscle fiber cannot contract for long without being damaged. Therefore, in any static posture or exertion of strength over a significant period of time, muscle fibers within muscle bundles and muscle bundles within muscles coordinate with each other to do the job in turns, as it were. This is normal and the reason why we can exert much more ...


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That movement is essentially a mix of a flying arm bar and a spinning arm bar with a bit of extra spinning added in to make it look more cinematic.


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The question asks for a detailed analysis of Taiji as it compares and contrasts with other martial arts. Looking beyond the specifics, there's an underlying question here about how Taiji is different from other martial arts. If we understand that, maybe it will help answer the specific questions. The first thing to realize about Taiji is that it's an "...


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Overall Sinking of the joints is one of the core techniques, and a method of directing/re-directing force. It allows directing force even in unexpected directions. Sinking of the joints (wrists, elbows, knees, hips) makes it difficult for an opponent to lock you. "Emptying" is another pillar, and is used both to mitigate impact of strikes, and ...


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In my experience: Control the elbows This can be done to spin an attacker around and grip them by the throat with the other hand controlling base of the spine, either gently or to crush the windpipe, but can also be used to initiate a chokehold. Many practitioners are sloppy about sinking the elbows, and thus trivially unbalanced in fixed-foot pushing. ...


2

Hello Taijiquan advocates, I enjoyed reading some of the responses especially the detailed one by "anon". I just wanted to mention that after Push Hands level there is a 2 man fist form called Taiji Sanshou 88. This gives the practitioners an idea of footwork, techniques & close distance in a continuous flowing manner. The speed for Taiji ...


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It's not uncommon, especially for internal styles. By my teacher was a Chinese national champion in internal and said it's not necessary. "Feeling" is essential, and I can elaborate more if interested, but really it just comes down to training hard and consistently over a extended period. (Years for basic competence, decades for even basic ...


1

I do not have experience in qigong, but I have seen this behavior in yoga, when standing at attention in odd poses in marching band Color Guard, and in some martial arts. It basically comes down to muscular tension in an unaccustomed pose. Almost every static position that humans hold requires some degree of effort to maintain that position, even just ...


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There is nothing that anyone can claim about anything which does not manifest. If it doesn't manifest, how can anyone observe it in order to know anything about it? You can hold a qigong pose and feel heat on your palms when you concentrate on them. Is that chi? What is chi? Define it. So far, nobody has shown that a metaphysical definition of chi (as a &...


1

This is a very basic strike/counter combination in the Fu taiji system. You see it there because Fu taiji developed out of bagua, via Fu Zhensong, who was reputed to be the only internal master who could rival Yang Chengfu at push hands. (They were great friends:) Fu's son, Fu Wing Fay, a contemporary of Cheng Man-ch'ing, specialized in taiji and leungyi, ...


1

One of the guiding principles in Taiji is to make sure each joint is able to move in any direction. In other words, in a neutral position. If a joint is too far extended outward, it won't be able to adapt to forces that cause it to extend further. And that causes your body's structure to fail. The same thing is true for when the joint is too far retracted. ...


1

Many excellent technical answers, so this answer is merely corollary: Uprooting can be described and creating a moment of unbalance in the opponent, in which the mind shuts down for an instant, allowing the practitioner to do whatever they want in followup. This was described to me by a Japanese practitioner (Judo, Jujutsu, Karate, Aikido, Ninjutsu) as the ...


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What has worked for me: Find sparring partners you trust Which means they have the necessary control not to damage you, and understand that free sparring is an exercise to validate techniques, such that, when an opponent yields (here used in the sense of acknowledging they have been bested in that round), the partner doesn't continue to apply force. ...


1

This is how it was taught in my school, where it was always the first application taught. Ward-off is to get the leading arm under the opponent's upper arm, and make forearm-to-forearm contact with that same arm with your off-arm. Rollback is used to turn the shoulder in a lock, controlling the elbow, to "drag" the opponent towards you down and to ...


1

I've also found this maxim useful in terms of partner encouragement in free sparring. Ideally, you don't want to win every round in a friendly free sparring match where the goal is research, as opposed to "winning". Partners can get frustrated if they lose every time, and might come with too much force, which can result in a counter strike with ...


1

This was explained to me in a simple way by my teacher and many advanced practitioners. Better to lose than to use brute force if the goal is internal technique This carries the strong qualification that it refers to what was called a "friendly match", push hands and free sparring, where the goal is to validate techniques, to see what works and ...


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This is a corollary answer, as the Dr. Yang and turtle breathing answers are good, but I'd strongly reinforce relaxed. Specifically: the throat should not be constricted It's good to practice steady airflow during training techniques where the breathing would naturally be disrupted. (At one point, my teacher, a master of some note, had the student sing a ...


1

Tai Chi uses the old taoist method of "turtle-breathing". This breathing method embodies the named qualities. The turtle was considered a sacred animal in ancient China, notably because of its longevity. The taoists thought of the turtle's special slow breathing as its secret to its longevity: fine: don't breathe large amounts of air, breathe like ...


1

It is not harmful to close your eyes when you train! That said, traditionally one should train with the eyes open (I speak of the Yang-Style, I don't really know about Chen-Style but I presume it's the same). This has to do with Yee (awkwardly translated to "intention") and Yee is closely related to the eyes. In sitting meditation, most of the ...


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