16

First, men who know nothing about martial arts may see a woman leading the class and immediately think that they (the men) could beat up the female teacher. So they think there is no reason why the woman could teach them anything about fighting. Second, some men might not want to train with women at all (students or teachers), because it would be awkward ...


14

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


14

I don't have medical studies, but I can at least point you in the right direction of what to look up, based on kinesiology and adult biology. Tendon Plasticity "Tendon Plasticity" (Viscoelastic tissue) - Tendons work somewhat like rubber bands - they have some stretch to them, but if you over-stretch them, just like a rubber band, it ends up loose and ...


13

Odds are, if you're asking this question, you already have the feeling that you're not being compensated sufficiently for you. If you were totally ok with it, you wouldn't be asking, right? So now you have some choices: Accept it Maybe the practice and training you get is totally worth it and the money doesn't matter. There's a lot of smaller schools ...


13

There is nothing wrong with what your son is doing! He is doing all the right things at the right time: he is gentle so his uke will train with him again. Gentleness might be because your son does not want to feel like he is acting like a bully. His moves are fine so that he is learning to do them reflexively. Remember repetition makes permanence. This ...


12

This is an age-old question about training in general. It's generalized as the "Breadth vs. Depth" dilemma. A "Depth First" training philosophy would prefer to train in a small number of things, but teach them deeply before moving onto other things. This way, you get really good at everything you learn, but you won't have a good understanding of the broader ...


11

Obviously the instructor I worked with last night knows what he's talking about because, as I said, he is an accomplished fighter. This doesn't make him an accomplished teacher at all. During your travels you will encounter different instructors with differing quality. You need to recognise when they are either not the best instructor for you, or when they ...


11

I've trained in many martial arts schools. There have always been one or two individuals that didn't know their own strength or who simply had some kind of mental issue that caused them to scare everyone else in the class who had the misfortune of partnering up with them. And I'm not even talking about sparring. It could be a nice, smooth, flowing, ...


11

Generally the way to become a good instructor is experience. Instruct at your club whenever you have the opportunity - get better at dealing with students and explaining things in a way that they understand - watch your instructor teach, how do they make it simpler for those that are struggling etc. (or maybe - how would you explain/demonstrate it ...


10

Concepts are great In general, I agree: concepts are the underlying part of all jiu-jitsu that works. Posture, base, leverage--these will be constants across all techniques that work. I think Kit goes off the rails by extrapolating from his experience to advice for the general populace, however. For instance: One of the things I noticed early early on ...


10

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


10

Sounds fine to me. The kid was told exactly what would happen if he disobeyed his instructor one more time. In fact, had the instructor not followed through on his threat to take away his belt, the kid would have learned that his instructor makes hollow threats, and that would invite even more insubordination. There's a reason for this harshness. At 12 ...


9

Figuring out if he either wants to be there or is forced to go by his parents is important. If the latter, then there is not much you can do about it. He might get better if he has something that engages him but that can be hard to gauge if he is not mature enough to tell you about it. You can still try though. As a side note, as Mark suggested in a ...


8

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're trying to ...


8

I believe that you are grossly underestimating the amount of $$ being spent on utilities and rent and other expenses. I've looked at rents in my local (suburb of phoenix, arizona) area and the minimum I've found for a 1500 square foot space (not built out) is $4000 per month. Not including utilities, insurance and so on. So, as an exercise, lets do some ...


8

Yes, this is normal although not common. Grading are set to determine if the examinee has a certain skill set appropriate for said grade. If they have, they should pass. If not, they should fail1. Most, if not all, syllabus have a recommended time between gradings. That time is a general on average most students will be able to learn the skills for the ...


8

You should (read: must) not teach children alone. That opens you up for all sorts of bad allegations that could tarnish your name forever and end you on certain registers you cannot get off. There should be at least one (or better two) other adults present in addition to the main instructor at all classes. Usual disclaimer: I am not a lawyer nor do I play ...


8

What rank to help teach? There is no minimum rank. The head instructor must have confidence in your abilities and have a need for assistance. In smaller clubs, you may be one of the most advanced students as a sankyu, and the instructor may request that you sometimes assist instructing junior students. At large clubs, this may be the role of a higher rank ...


7

The FBI compiles some data but not as fine-grained as you want. Beyond that I think you're SOL other than looking at guesses. My favorite such nonscientific approach is the "HAPV" (Habitual Acts of Physical Violence) idea formulated by Patrick McCarthy. He seems to describe things accurately in my judgment. That is to say, he alleges that the most common ...


7

Any of your proposed actions could be appropriate, depending upon circumstances. As a student, you need to understand what you need to improve, exactly what you need to get there, and practice. It's your teacher's job to set you on the right path by showing you what you need to improve, and giving you the tools to get there. Mindless practice does not lead ...


7

Personal remark Reading it charitable, he's a perfectionist, just @Sardathrion wrote. I sometimes catch myself talking too much in class and it's been brought forward. Especially when teaching adults this can become a common theme, but I, personally, was thankful for pointing that out, as I want to be the best teacher I possibly can be. So in the end, both ...


6

Good question. Children are harder to discipline than adults, because they are more likely to push the boundaries, they are less likely to take responsibility for their actions, and they'll frequently have a parent who thinks the sun shines from their wazoo and their little angel could do no wrong. As their new instructor you have to let them know in no ...


6

A good instructor will start your training with body conditioning and basic techniques. It is unlikely you will be thrown to the on your first day. As you become proficient in your skills, you may be invited to begin sparring with a partner (who should be matched to your size and skill level). Have courage, or as they say in Korean, Yong Gi. You will ...


6

I've been in your instructor's position a few times, and I've threatened to demote. But I recognize that taking away a belt can be detrimental in several ways (call me a snowflake if you want). First, a kid works hard for the belt. Then you take it away (or prevent him from wearing it). That's embarrassing. And what have you done? You've let a single ...


6

Most of this advise is a sub-set of looking out for a Mc Dojop. I am going to assume that you are referring to technical knowledge instead of generic "should I train here" which has been answered here and here. Are a majority students showing signs of injuries? If so, run. Is the teacher explaining techniques safely? Is the teacher explaining techniques ...


6

If you love martial arts and are bored with your current school, it may be because it's designed in a predictable way - belts, ranks, etc. You can see where it's leading and it can make you feel boxed into a program. Some will disagree, because many people stay with their style all their lives, but you might find if you leave that school, and try another ...


6

I'm with Sardathrion that martial arts are a small part of self defense, and one that we seldom actually use these days, so your child is not necessarily missing out on anything by practicing the movements as more of an intellectual exercise. That said, you might consider appealing to him about ensuring that his uke is getting a good experience. Learning ...


6

Unfortunately, videogames aren't in a place where they can do much for you at this time - future technology, VR, etc. might solve all of these problems, but it likely won't be very soon. Most videogames use buttons and joysticks - so you're not getting a solid muscle memory built up from that. The ones that use gloves/remote VR controls, etc. often have a ...


5

In Seido Karate these are two different techniques. Morote Zuki is a double punch to the same level (Jodan/Chudan/Gedan). see image here Awase Zuki is a combined middle + face punch see image here


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