21

At first glance Krav Maga and Systema seem to be very similar in that they are both very unconventional, no-rules, practical self-defence, martial arts (although Krav isn't technically a martial art) which are no holds barred and generally formless. However... Krav Maga is basically a very raw, dangerous situation survival system (including avoidance and ...


21

Realistically a collection of white belts aren't going to challenge you much if you've been training for 14 years. I'm reasonably new, tiny and a girl so I'm probably not ever going to find myself in a situation like yours, but some of the ways that my guys train with me might be useful ways that you can challenge yourself instead. Teach me! Teach me! ...


15

Your confusion may be that you're thinking of the nunchaku chain wrapping around the neck, as a choke to cut off air, but the proper technique uses the sticks to apply pressure to the carotid arteries on either side at once, using the target's neck as the fulcrum for the levers.


14

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


14

There is nothing wrong with what your son is doing! He is doing all the right things at the right time: he is gentle so his uke will train with him again. Gentleness might be because your son does not want to feel like he is acting like a bully. His moves are fine so that he is learning to do them reflexively. Remember repetition makes permanence. This ...


13

This answer is from a karate perspective: The word "Uke", traditionally translated as "block", is actually a short form of the verb "ukeru", meaning "to receive". Very few of the "blocks" are designed to stop a technique head-on, and using them like that is not going to work properly. The problem is, these self-defense guys hear the word "block", and then ...


11

Kotegaeshi (小手返し etimology) is a supinating wrist lock and is generally translated as "wrist throw". The throw works on the manipulation of the wrist, which turns the fore-arm, then the shoulder, then the whole body. If tori's hand is supporting uke's wrist, then the twist will be much lessen. This means that there is less pressure/pain on the wrist itself. ...


11

What's what all the wrist grabbing? In violent situations (as opposed to competitive situations), your assailant is likely to grab you. Grab and hit is one of the most common attacks. Being number 2 behind the haymaker according to the statistics I have seen. Also grab and stab btw. If you have a guard or fence raised they'll grab it to control and clear ...


10

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


10

Concepts are great In general, I agree: concepts are the underlying part of all jiu-jitsu that works. Posture, base, leverage--these will be constants across all techniques that work. I think Kit goes off the rails by extrapolating from his experience to advice for the general populace, however. For instance: One of the things I noticed early early on ...


10

First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


10

Self defence comes to mind: Historically, and I guess still now-a-days, people do sit in seiza in Japan. It is not an idea position to defend oneself from and this is by design. Therefore, daito-ryu (and many others) developed techniques that could be used to fight either a sat or standing opponent. Most of those techniques emphasis getting up as quickly as ...


9

As an instructor of Krav maga and Israeli Combat Systems (ICS), I can tell you there are very specific reasons for not turning at the end of a punch. Krav Maga and ICS are meant to teach people quickly and effectively defend themselves in a street fight. Unlike a tournament or cage fight, anytime you get into a street fight, your skills will deteriorate ...


9

If you are 75 kg, then you should not have a problem throwing an opponent who is 102 kg with a basic hip throw. The major hip throw (ogoshi) is the first hip throw in the judo curriculum. It's simplest to start with throwing ogoshi slowly because ogoshi has the nice property that you can stop mid-throw. It's easiest to understand the mechanics while ...


9

This probably should go without saying, but you will learn to do what you train to do. If you only train your ukemi as "If they use technique A, use breakfall B", you're probably not going to think of it when you trip instead. To some degree, randori or just training a variety of techniques will teach you how to fall properly spontaneously because you're ...


9

I take Toshiro Daigo's book Kodokan Judo Throwing Techniques to be the official word on throw classification. Daigo is the chief instructor at the Kodokan, the mother school of judo in Tokyo, Japan. obi-tori gaeshi (sutemi version) is hikkikomi gaeshi The top player in the lightweight class was a man named Stepanov, who inflicted pain on many Japanese ...


9

So I'm assuming that you mean someone sitting on another person putting pressure on their neck via their knee. I find this to be interesting timing for this question, because a few days ago a man was killed in Minnesota after a police officer sat on his neck using his knee for more than 8 minutes. So that brings us to our first example: Police Training ...


8

This question about vertical-fist punching might help you. I'd say that keeping the fist vertical for a "jab or "cross" makes it an entirely different punch with a dubious connection to boxing or MMA. As for this specific situation, I think the salient point is that a fellow student of unknown expertise is giving you advice that contradicts your instructor'...


8

You're asking the right questions. And you answer them, too. If you're looking for a defense of the use of the traditional "blocks" in karate, you're going to be disappointed with my reply. The blocks you do in karate, Taekwondo, and even kung-fu arts, are based on the forms you've learned. That's where they come from. And the forms are not teaching you how ...


8

Ki (気) does mean "energy" or "mood", but the A (合) is just a shout of enthusiasm (Korean does use the energy+join setup with K'ihap), so no, there's nothing mystical about it any more than a sports team breaking their huddle by shouting something like, "go team!"


8

It is also a simple fact of aging. You could look at any sport, and see the same thing. Champions in any sport at extended ages are outliers. Some examples of these outliers would be: Al Oerter - Olympic Champion in track and field, winning medals in events into his mid 40's Gordie Howe - NHL player, played in 5 decades, last game at 52 (All Star electee ...


8

One important thing, at least for arm movement whips, is proper technique, namely rotating your forearm. For example, one of the first things that new students get taught is the "rising block" or "high block", protecting your head from an descending strike. Say your right hand is "chambered" at your right hip. If your movement ...


7

The FBI compiles some data but not as fine-grained as you want. Beyond that I think you're SOL other than looking at guesses. My favorite such nonscientific approach is the "HAPV" (Habitual Acts of Physical Violence) idea formulated by Patrick McCarthy. He seems to describe things accurately in my judgment. That is to say, he alleges that the most common ...


7

If your opponent throws a knee while not in clinch a good way to stop it is to extend your arm (jab) to their chest. If you lean slightly into it your arm should reach longer than their knee. You may as well hit the chin instead of the chest. If you are locked in the clinch you can try to throw your opponent off balance as soon as they lift their leg to ...


7

Thrusting AND Slashing are both useful It might "seem" slashing is more powerful because it involves bigger movements, and depending on the weapon, you feel, in your arm, that you're getting more force... but... it's not. Thrusting concentrates more force onto a smaller point, allowing better penetration. Stabbing weapons tend to cause more lethal ...


7

I feel you, bro. Smashing them or putting yourself in bad positions doesn't really help. In my similar situation I see three options: Train something else Make each of them a black belt in something Smash smash smash Train Something Else You don't have to do BJJ. Maybe in this city the best way for you to get better at fighting is to train boxing instead. ...


7

Catching a kick is a common technique in Muay Thai and a major part of san da/san shou (Chinese kickboxing). In Muay Thai, I've seen lots of kicking out or sweeping the other leg. This clip teaches one method, and the video ends with clips of competition applications against opponents doing their best to stay standing. Other techniques I've seen in that art ...


7

Based on mattm's comment, you may be looking for a chassé kick from Savate. There are several variations on the move, but I've found at least one reference to Bruce Lee's signature cross-over side kick coming from the chassé-croisé kick from Savate.


7

The fact that Wladimir Klitscho could hug his way to win after win keeps me up at night tbh... Clinching is difficult to manage as a ringleader. That's why, I assume, it goes unpunished. At one point, you need to allow infighters to infight(meaning when 1 hand is available, even though the other is holding - for example).. As per why it isn't punished? It's ...


7

I took it quite literally by perform 50 of each kick daily. I saw improvements pretty quickly. Concentrate on the technique first. The flexibility will come with time.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible