33

The shouting, called kiai, has multiple purported purposes. I would note that I'm posting these not out of a necessary belief in them, but out of explanation as they were taught to me: The forced and trained rapid exhalation of breath. This can be used as both focus (by focusing on breath, one is less inclined to focus on the fear of failure when faced with ...


21

Realistically a collection of white belts aren't going to challenge you much if you've been training for 14 years. I'm reasonably new, tiny and a girl so I'm probably not ever going to find myself in a situation like yours, but some of the ways that my guys train with me might be useful ways that you can challenge yourself instead. Teach me! Teach me! ...


20

At first glance Krav Maga and Systema seem to be very similar in that they are both very unconventional, no-rules, practical self-defence, martial arts (although Krav isn't technically a martial art) which are no holds barred and generally formless. However... Krav Maga is basically a very raw, dangerous situation survival system (including avoidance and ...


19

Kicking has four parts to it: flexibility, technique, focus and ab's. For the flexibility, I have found PNF stretching to be quite beneficial. This is a form of stretching that uses periodic resistance/contraction followed by relaxation to achieve a deeper stretch and excellent long term results (here is a reasonable Youtube example). Of course flexibility ...


17

I feel there's a core issue here being neglected: When I throw a punch, SOMETIMES MY WRIST DOESN'T STAY STRAIGHT and I run the risk of spraining it. If I could highlight, underline, and make it flash, I would. Your issue here is not simply wrist strength (which, by the way, is not going to be corrected by simple strength training alone), but rather your ...


15

Depends on the style, but for the purposes of most Japanese martial arts, the "shouts" are Kiai and serve a couple different purposes: Contracts the diaphragm and chest which can allow you to take a hit better. Puts extra "energy" behind the strike as it causes you to focus on the moment of impact. Shows "spirit" when in competition. Shows where strong ...


15

Your confusion may be that you're thinking of the nunchaku chain wrapping around the neck, as a choke to cut off air, but the proper technique uses the sticks to apply pressure to the carotid arteries on either side at once, using the target's neck as the fulcrum for the levers.


14

I'm going to be very precise with my answer here. Your technique will remain the same, your kicks and punches should still be the same as when you practice them. What does change though is your approach to your opponent so that you can deliver that technique. Because your opponent is taller, you will have more issues than it just being harder to reach their ...


14

Generally (though this is often mis-taught), any sort of fingertip striking is done to the soft tissues of the body, a notable exception being thumb tip striking which may attack bone. You'll notice the way the body must be positioned in each regard to the twisting of the hand to strike palm up, palm down, or palm perpendicular, which hints at positioning ...


14

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


13

My answer is not exactly on the question "Rising on the ball or staying flat", but rather tries to make clear the reason why exactly you might prefer to stay flat, and not even pivot away. The underlying reasoning can be transferred to your question, since standing up will diminish power and snap according to the views below. Of course, all of the following ...


13

Try pivoting on the heel, before you shift your weight onto the foot, as opposed to pivoting on the ball after the weight is already on it. I had an interesting experience regarding this question when I switched from traditional Tae Kwon Do to Shaolin Kung Fu years ago: In TKD, there was a very intense focus on all the little details of how exactly to ...


13

There is nothing wrong with what your son is doing! He is doing all the right things at the right time: he is gentle so his uke will train with him again. Gentleness might be because your son does not want to feel like he is acting like a bully. His moves are fine so that he is learning to do them reflexively. Remember repetition makes permanence. This ...


12

Someone who is "rooted" to the ground is difficult to move or control and can use this property to move and control others more easily. It's all about body structure. Here is a video of a short demonstration of being rooted. Uprooting someone is when you break their connection to the ground or the structure that connects them to the ground so that they ...


12

Head shots - knock out Impact to the head can cause actual loss of consciousness, by brain trauma. Liver shots - knock down Hitting the liver can be devastating, but does not cause loss of consciousness. As shown here in the Hatton/Castillo fight, or here, with de la Hoya getting hit by Bernard Hopkins, liver strikes can be so incredibly painful that ...


11

Thanks to Dave L. for alerting me to this very erudite discussion! Re. marketing material; there is no strong evidence that any of the "set play" sequences demonstrated by Barton-Wright and Pierre Vigny for B-W's Pearson's Magazine article were performed verbatim during training at the original Bartitsu Club in London. On that basis, it's arguable that ...


11

Kotegaeshi (小手返し etimology) is a supinating wrist lock and is generally translated as "wrist throw". The throw works on the manipulation of the wrist, which turns the fore-arm, then the shoulder, then the whole body. If tori's hand is supporting uke's wrist, then the twist will be much lessen. This means that there is less pressure/pain on the wrist itself. ...


11

What's what all the wrist grabbing? In violent situations (as opposed to competitive situations), your assailant is likely to grab you. Grab and hit is one of the most common attacks. Being number 2 behind the haymaker according to the statistics I have seen. Also grab and stab btw. If you have a guard or fence raised they'll grab it to control and clear ...


11

This answer is from a karate perspective: The word "Uke", traditionally translated as "block", is actually a short form of the verb "ukeru", meaning "to receive". Very few of the "blocks" are designed to stop a technique head-on, and using them like that is not going to work properly. The problem is, these self-defense guys hear the word "block", and then ...


10

As Trevoke said, there are no shortcuts, no fast-and-easy way to know you are relaxed. This is a very deep subject. Relaxing the body is much easier than relaxing the mind. There are biofeedback methods you can use to relax your body. Relaxing the mind gets into meditation. However, as long as your mind searches out for an objective -- or a shortcut like ...


10

[NB: It is entirely likely that you will have no idea what I'm talking about here. Unless you have training in Bujinkan Ninpo Taijutsu, this will all be foreign to you, and this is purposely so. This is based on content from my own training manual, and is meant to aid students in their continued study of taijutsu and is not for everyone.] From the ...


10

Concepts are great In general, I agree: concepts are the underlying part of all jiu-jitsu that works. Posture, base, leverage--these will be constants across all techniques that work. I think Kit goes off the rails by extrapolating from his experience to advice for the general populace, however. For instance: One of the things I noticed early early on ...


10

Self defence comes to mind: Historically, and I guess still now-a-days, people do sit in seiza in Japan. It is not an idea position to defend oneself from and this is by design. Therefore, daito-ryu (and many others) developed techniques that could be used to fight either a sat or standing opponent. Most of those techniques emphasis getting up as quickly as ...


9

A Kihap is basically a battle cry, carried over into modern times. But there are actually some very positive benefits. It strengthens your core by tightening your abdominal mussels. This translates into more power in your motion and increased defense. The Kinetic Chain, also called Kinetic Linking, is the way your legs can pass their power through your ...


9

Absolutely. Actually, one of the schools in the Bujinkan (Gikan-ryu) was reportedly heavily influenced by the inclusion of a one-armed soke. There is, of course, a strong natural disadvantage (all else being equal) to having only one arm available (for example, the opponent knows your high attacks will largely come from that side, you are not naturally ...


9

Being rooted means having a stable center of gravity (CoG). Uprooting someone means to go under their CoG and take control of it. Once that is done, defeat, throw, project, lift are just possible courses to follow. This answer to a question about a seated Daito-Ryu technique makes allusion to it even by the wording used - the teacher takes control of the ...


9

A knockout occurs when the brain bounces around the braincase. This movement causes injury which will lead to unconsciousness. In order to have a high chance of knocking the person out, the best place to target is the chin. This is both a relatively soft target, compared to other parts of the skull, and is relatively easy to get to. Impact there creates a ...


9

If you are 75 kg, then you should not have a problem throwing an opponent who is 102 kg with a basic hip throw. The major hip throw (ogoshi) is the first hip throw in the judo curriculum. It's simplest to start with throwing ogoshi slowly because ogoshi has the nice property that you can stop mid-throw. It's easiest to understand the mechanics while ...


9

First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


9

This probably should go without saying, but you will learn to do what you train to do. If you only train your ukemi as "If they use technique A, use breakfall B", you're probably not going to think of it when you trip instead. To some degree, randori or just training a variety of techniques will teach you how to fall properly spontaneously because you're ...


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