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I would classify it as a variant of kosoto-gari, kosoto-gake, or de-ashi-barai, depending on the particulars. Teaching it as "the sticker" rather than one of those looks like a valid choice. I wouldn't worry too much about which bucket it goes in. Judo's taxonomy of techniques is a pedagogical framework with clear distinctions imposed onto the reality of a ...


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Timing v. structure (deashi-harai v. kosoto-gari) I would guess that the 'sticker' label is applied to a throw where tori's leg/foot starts in contact with uke's leg, but I think these variations would not be classified as the same Kodokan technique. The key distinguishing feature between a kosoto-gari and a deashi-harai is whether uke has weight on the leg ...


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Judo throws are HARD to do! You cannot dabble in them. It takes a lot time and patience to develop functional throwing technique. Wrestling is easier to pick up in a shorter amount of time. It's also not good for aging players. Judo is a lifetime sport where your throws can get better with age. I've seen 60 year old folks with amazing throws. If you want ...


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I have only been taught one throw in BJJ, and it wasn't really effective. Let's be careful with our language. It's not that the throw was ineffective, but that you are ineffective at the technique so far. Expect to take at least a year of regular clinch practice, more likely three, for your stand-up grappling to get good enough to execute throws reliably. ...


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Spend time wisely First, a general note is important. The strategic problem with judo throws for BJJ is that they require a major time investment to learn, and the payoff in BJJ competition is low. According to the BJJ rules, you can drop right to the ground and avoid situations where throwing is practical. With that in mind, we'll look at your three ...


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Curriculum Many BJJ schools have a self-defense curriculum tied into no-holds-barred or MMA competition techniques. This should involve learning how to safely stand up, specialized escapes, and how to protect against various strikes, and then training those techniques in modified BJJ sparring (as in, with light slaps) or in something closer to MMA sparring. ...


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While the nutcracker analogy is useful, there is a subtle difference: with a nutcracker, the stress is applied to the nut with a compression lock, the 'nut' (limb you are using as a fulcrum) is supposed to sustain the stress and redirect it to the 'axle' (the opponent's joint) Some basic newtonian concepts for improving the efficiency of your compression ...


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