15

Your confusion may be that you're thinking of the nunchaku chain wrapping around the neck, as a choke to cut off air, but the proper technique uses the sticks to apply pressure to the carotid arteries on either side at once, using the target's neck as the fulcrum for the levers.


8

It is also a simple fact of aging. You could look at any sport, and see the same thing. Champions in any sport at extended ages are outliers. Some examples of these outliers would be: Al Oerter - Olympic Champion in track and field, winning medals in events into his mid 40's Gordie Howe - NHL player, played in 5 decades, last game at 52 (All Star electee ...


6

Excerpt of Canonical Answer This quotation is attributed to Kyuzo Mifune on page 162 of Kodokan Judo: Throwing Techniques by Toshiro Daigo. Sweeping is similar to brushing an extremely light object away. When hooking, you execute the technique as if pulling a rooted plant out from the ground. Reaping is similar to the movement of reaping and ...


5

Kubi-nage appears to have been coined by Mikinosuke Kawaishi, as the earliest references to judo throws by this name appear in his works.2 3 He describes it as a hip-throw with the arm wrapped around uke's neck: This is in contrast to his description of koshi-guruma, which uses a standard collar grip without the arm wrapped around the neck. He does note the ...


5

For the practical part, first see Sean Duggan's answer. Then consider the fact that even though it is not technically "choking", the nunchaku will work the other way around as choking instrument perfectly fine, too. What you basically have is two levers that allow you to exercise a large amount of force (roughly 1:10) on what's wrapped in the chain. That may ...


5

Unconventional osaekomi-waza Most legally scoring pins come under one of the 10 osaekomi-waza classifications. However, I have seen a couple of unconventional pins which as far as I am aware do not come under any of these labels: "Inverted kesa-gatame" This is a technique favoured by Matsumoto Kaori and Funakubo Haruka, used to success a number of times: ...


5

Just to add to MattM's answer, here is how the Kodokan Throwing Techniques video illustrates the difference in the sweeps in the two throws: Yama-arashi same side eri grip off-balancing uke forwards standing directly in front of uke, sweeping upwards leg parallel to uke's legs almost fully in contact Harai-goshi standard collar grip / under-arm grip off-...


5

I prefer to be left hand forward, if I am hit in the right eye (and it swells/vision blurred etc.) I feel able to carry on. If I lose some vision in my left eye, I struggle much more, I have to turn my head to favour the right eye or even switch stance. Now given that the way I spar encourages kicks from the front leg and the jab, this all ties in heavily ...


5

The Kodokan Judo Nage-waza video illustrates the differences in its section on Osoto-otoshi: Let's look at the differences between osoto-gari and osoto-otoshi. If your opponent's foot goes up in the air, it's osoto-gari. If your opponent's foot remains on the matting as you sweep and he goes down, it's an osoto-otoshi. The Kodokan Judo Throwing ...


4

I do not know exactly what "crucifix" means to you, but will try to explain how I have seen this term used and how your examples relate. Judo rule change My understanding of the rule change you have illustrated is: The left position was a pin before, and is a pin now (ushiro kesa gatame). The right position was not a pin before, but is a pin now (ura ...


4

While "reliably" may be disputable, the main means to make the bent-arm variant (from mune-gatame, i.e. not the classic kimura with uke's wrist behind her back, although the principles mostly apply) work on the elbow is torque: First, pull the arm (elbow and wrist) as close to yourself (uke's hip and shoulder respectively) as possible. This indeed is the "...


4

Yes, there is. Ude garami is a commonly misunderstood technique. Mainly because most people in western countries get taught that it has to be performed with uke's arm being bent. There is even a mistranslation in German where its called Armbeugehebel ("arm bend lever"), making this even more confusing. This is likely the case in other languages as well. In ...


4

Of the materials published by the Kodokan, the two which describe the classification of Katame-waza in most detail are: Kodokan Judo: The Essential Guide to Judo by Its Founder Jigoro Kano (1997) Kodokan Judo Katame Waza: Various techniques and their names (1994) (video) Both works demonstrate and list the points of distinction of each technique and their ...


4

The IBJJF specifically bans1 two judo-throws where uke lands on their head/neck. Despite the IJF prohibiting throws which "may endanger or injure the opponent especially the opponent’s neck or spinal vertebrae", there are a number of throws where it is not uncommon5 in competition for uke to hit the mat first with their head, or impact with it after falling, ...


4

If you compete in MMA for long enough you will get hurt. Every time you are gambling with your health. If you start competing young you won't get to be good when you are old. Or rather, you may be a good instructor or a good coach but you will never be a good competitor with the damage. If you start competing old, you may struggle to learn the ...


4

I think it's important to make a distinction between "someone, somewhere in the Judo community has used this at some point" and "this is widely known and used in mainstream or competition Judo". There have been Judo practitioners and training groups that focused heavily on groundwork - in particular, the Kosen Judo substyle. Just through convergent evolution,...


4

Yama arashi examples from Kodokan Judo Throwing Techniques show sweep In Toshiro Daigo's book Kodokan Judo Throwing Techniques published by Kodansha International in 2005, which I consider the best canonical source for throw classification, there are two examples of yama arashi and two examples of throws that are explicitly not yama arashi. All of these ...


4

Now this is a very interesting question that I personally have experience with. As I have a large cutting scar on my left eye, I can't open my left eye. The eye works, but I can't open the eyelid. I use a left forward stance, even though I am left handed. However, I don't do boxing. But it doesn't matter. The eyesight isn't that much different when 1 eye is ...


4

If you throw, there is a name Yes, there are overlaps. If you throw someone on their back, judo will have a name for it, and sumo will have a name for it. I imagine the classifiers will force throws into one category or another, even if they are sufficiently distant from the canonical versions that non-experts may not be able to identify them. As I am ...


4

I do not have the Daigo at hand, so I will answer from my experience as a licensed instructor: O-soto-otoshi As an otoshi technique, the force applied does almost solely go towards the ground; all your body works to break the balance towards one or both heels and your body works from the top down. In my opinion, this includes the arm being pushed down in ...


3

but both alternatives seem to help It depends on the application of the "block". When you take a technique out of a kata, you also remove the context of its intended use. In general, I would take a look at how other styles perform the same kata; usually there is a reason that a particular body shape is used and without reference to what it's for, it's very ...


3

There is a very good video on youtube which explains the difference between Yama Arashi and Harai Goshi. Harai Goshi doesn't require you to lift your opponent up. Whereas the Yama Arashi uses an arm throw with your opponent in a lifted position. From there your leg is only used to keep their foot from being planted forward. Where the Harai Goshi uses the leg ...


3

The name is different with the leg sweep. Historically, yama arashi is catagorized as a "hand throw". The fundamental impulse comes from the arms as you lift your uke over your hip. You do unbalance them through the hip, but the primary force is through the arms. Compare that to harai goshi, which is classified as a "hip throw" and the primary impulse is ...


3

Techniques require speed and power (some more than others) Take a technique like a straight punch at range to the face. To land this punch, the attacker need speeds to move across distance to reach the target before defense can be employed. As a younger person, it may be sufficient to increase speed and power to be successful. If you are faster than ...


3

Daki Age (High Lift, Slam) In judo, to escape from your opponent's guard position, you can stand up and pick them up off the mat. Once you have them off the mat, a referee will call matte and reset the match from standing. In a self-defense situation, the technique you would actually apply is daki age where you slam the opponent into the ground. This is ...


3

While these are not technically ude-garami according to Kodokan classification (since they do not use a figure-four grip), similar techniques in Judo can be applied to cause pain to a bent elbow-joint more directly than the kata forms of ude-garami.1 The mechanics of these kansetsu-waza is to "lock" the upper arm in a fixed position against your own body (...


3

Reasons for changes To expand on Philip's answer, the Japanese report from the Kodokan states the change is in response to the increased prevalence of these techniques in the previous 3 years: 平成26(2014)年から多彩化を続ける技術に対応するため、講道館技研究部で、技名称の再検討を行ってきた。 In order to respond to the ever-diversifying techniques from 2014, the Kodokan's Waza Research ...


3

The flying armbar to counter a single leg attack should not be expected to work outside of demonstration. Notice for example, how the receiver helpfully presents their arm to be locked while holding the leg up. If they don't, you need to find another option.


3

Kodokan Judo Nage Waza - Various techniques and their names in its section on sutemi-waza explicitly describes a throw which starts off in a kata-guruma position but is executed by sacrificing one's balance to the ground as uki-waza: This is a technique of following on from kata-guruma to uki-waza. In this technique, as you are sacrificing yourself ...


3

Under the heading of providing a viable answer rather than a comment, the chief solution is providing yourself a target that requires you to turn your shoulder fully to create the full extension. You note that you can't hang a bag, but for the sake of providing a target, you don't need something that extensive. All you need is a point to strike. I personally ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible