New answers tagged

2

As the lower text says, there are several possible targets besides the abdomen for front kicks, most notably the legs. From my experience, using the whole foot is good for moving the opponent, may it be the leg to compromise balance and rhythm or the whole body (abdomen push kick). Sure, you could do that with the balls (abdomen, maybe even bladder) or the ...


2

I believe this is mostly a cultural difference between Muay Thai and Boxing / Kickboxing. Muay Thai values continuous advancement forward and strongly views any backward motion as defensive. The bouncing back and forth is seen as weak and overly defensive in Muay Thai. But it works in boxing, because in boxing the emphasis is on scoring a point, rather than ...


4

The answer is similar to the ones to earlier questions: It is mainly practicality in full-contact sparring vs. ideal technique. Theoretically, fully opening the hip by more pronounced foot rotation offers you two things: Firstly, you can do a powerful roundhouse kick just as well, with the very same opening, which makes you less readable. Secondly, it is ...


5

Even in karate or Taekwondo sparring where this stance is most often used, they teach that the way you deal with a powerful opponent is not to come in range of his kicks and punches. That means you should circle around him towards his outside. Don't move towards his inside. If he has a back stance with the left leg forward, then you circle to his left. If ...


3

This is a stance for point fighting not for full contact. They can pull off very fast attacks but usually don't hit hard from this position (because doing so is against the rules in this style). You might have trouble reaching the back leg for a double leg takedown. However their stance is very wide so a single leg takedown should be easy. Otherwise just ...


0

Each part of your hand (or foot) is a weapon, depending how you hold it and the technique used for striking. In the case of a karate chop, the locked wrist and tense fingers create a blunt surface, it is referred to as a "knife hand". Typically, this strike would use a circular, swinging motion to attack (as opposed to a straight-punch). Any strike,...


0

Karate chopped at age 15 on back of neck while standing idle waiting for a bus; loss consciousness for about 10sec. ; was told by witnesses (a gang of 7 young men were running through the streets, practicing on folks). At age 70 developed large orange sized ball-swelling- of fatty content; that’s occasionally painful, slings from the point of contact.


-1

Yes, blocks are a real thing but one should block and attack, simultaneously.


1

In my opinion, regardless of what martial art training, gender does not matter; it's skill level and you treat them accordingly. You don't hold back because of gender that doesn't help them at all.


1

Obviously, try and fight your way out of it but if your opponent is in that deep? You're going for a ride. In which case, tuck your chin to your chest so as not to smack the back of your head on the mat/floor/ground/etc and exhale as soon as your back hits the mat/floor/ground/etc.


-2

Disclaimer: this comes from someone who doesn't train. At all. Self defense: gauge their eyes with your thumbs. One at a time. That's got to hurt. A strike beforehand would aid their cooperation in the endevour. Sparring: cling on. If you hug the person it's difficult for them to throw you to the ground. And even if they do it gives you wrestling options.


3

Whilst your question is justified (your reference recommends shifting the weight to the front foot), Philip Klöcking is right. You do not need to shift your weight onto the front foot to execute a strong jab. Shifting your weight onto the front foot will allow you transfer more wight into your jab, but this necessitates forward commitment, which makes it ...


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