25

They are the same thing. It's only a matter of romanization (spelling japanese words using roman letters). As a reference point, here is how it is pronounced in japanese (found on wikipedia). As to how it is written, it all comes down to how the names were romanized. The most popular systems used today are probably the Hepburn system, the Nihon-Shiki ...


22

"Harden up", "come on", "toughen up", "get it together", "just do it", and "let's go" can all be slotted into the same purpose. One could even reach for "osu". I find the gist of the phrase comes more from elements other than word choice, such as volume, sharpness of tone, or accompanying the phrase with a loud clap.


22

Here is a list of warning signs Note that there exists valid reasons for all of those, this is why they are only warning signs. Monthly or yearly fee that one cannot get out of paying if one quits. Buying all supplies from the Dojo/Gym. No possibility to try out a lesson before signing up. People with little or no experience are promised to achieve black ...


19

Here is a list of canonical signs Large and opaque fee structure. Unqualified instructors. There is a cult mentality in the Dojo. Secret techniques that are "too dangerous for the untrained to know or see" that require special training, usually costing more money. Obtaining a higher rank costs lots of money This is the accepted answer because the canonical ...


12

"Ju-jutsu" and "jiu-jitsu" are different romanizations of the same Japanese word(s) 柔術. This is analogous to how we have both "Qur'an" and "Koran" from the Arabic الْقُرْآن‎. 柔術 was historically spelled with hiragana1 2 like so: じうじゆつ Individually these characters are transliterated:3 じ う じ ゆ つ ji u ji yu tsu but when occurring together, some of these ...


12

Disclaimer: I am a judo ikkyu who prefers osotogari but doesn't have an osotoguruma to speak of. I will be using the opinions of more knowledgable judoka to inform this answer. Judo throws are named and grouped by their telltale action. That is, the names are a pedagogical tool to delineate the various body mechanics one can use to throw an opponent. That's ...


12

Someone who is "rooted" to the ground is difficult to move or control and can use this property to move and control others more easily. It's all about body structure. Here is a video of a short demonstration of being rooted. Uprooting someone is when you break their connection to the ground or the structure that connects them to the ground so that they ...


12

It's hard to tell, but it looks like the dude on the right's left arm is pushed up behind his back. I hear that called that a "chicken wing", which is similar to BJJ's "Kimura", catch-wrestling's double wrist lock, and judo's ude garami. I'm sure there's a name for it in SAMBO, and aikido too. I say "similar to" because most of those techniques actually ...


12

This is a nothing lock - it is a made for television move. While Sherlock's thumb and index finger do lie along anterior wrist points used frequently with various wrist locks or throws (e.g. kotogaeshi in Aikido), this particular implementation is a waste of bandwidth and screen frames, it is a British version of Hollywood nonsense. Try it, and see how ...


11

It depends on context, skill and time spent training. If they just start training they're a student 学生(xué'shēng), when they become an official disciple they'll be called 徒弟(tú'dì). Then when they become an instructor/teacher they'll be called 老师(lǎo'shī). When they take on disciples of their own they'll be 师父(shī'fu) and when their skill is widely ...


11

In Japanese, some6 initial consonants become voiced when they occur internal to some5 compound words, e.g: kimono / judo-gi koshi-guruma / o-goshi katame-waza / kesa-gatame shime-waza / hadaka-jime tori / kata-ashi-dori hon-kesa-gatamae / ippon hasami-jime / kani-basami This process is called rendaku, and the conditions under which it applies are ...


9

Ukemi's answer is much more accurate than mine. If you are referring to 柔術, then we can look at the two kanji. The first kanji is found in 柔道 -- judo. The second kanji is found in 剣術 -- Kenjutsu. Thus, I would opt for jujutsu as being the logical romanji form of 柔術. The other "spelling" maybe viewed as either incorrect or illogical based on this. Thus, I ...


9

Being rooted means having a stable center of gravity (CoG). Uprooting someone means to go under their CoG and take control of it. Once that is done, defeat, throw, project, lift are just possible courses to follow. This answer to a question about a seated Daito-Ryu technique makes allusion to it even by the wording used - the teacher takes control of the ...


9

The short form of the answer is that it is entirely dependent on the organization and its standards and customs. For the longer answer, start by looking at the way the word "master" is used in English and notice that it has several meanings that are only loosely related. "Master" can mean "teacher", it can mean "lord" especially when referring to the "...


8

Similar to Sardathrion's answer the definition on Wikipedia is Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development. I and several members of the MA project there ...


8

Since you are already using Japanese terms, may I suggest: 頑張れ -- ganbare! Which translates as "Do Your Best!"


7

If you look at the forms tag you'll notice it's description is a sequence of movements traditionally used in the practice and performance of a martial art. An important word here is 'traditionally'. A form is not only a method to teach and learn a particular technique, it has also been used to preserve and pass on a proven technique in a formal and ...


7

This answer is in reply to @Dave Liepmann's query, and is in support of Trevoke's answer. No need to upvote this one. Dave Liepmann asked, "So, unbalancing and locking, or unbalancing or locking?" This is a common way to frame this concept. When your body has not learned this stuff, your mind wants to put this into neat boxes because the underlying ...


7

I totally agree on the pedantry stuff, and i think that it is really depending on what each person thinks about it. For me, a kind of Martial Art has a tradition, a specific form or style or is following certain rules. I believe that there is also some kind of beauty in those 'Arts'... I personally would even go further and divide Martial Arts and Combat ...


7

I don't know about in English, but there certainly is in Japanese. In Shorinji Kempo we have different words for every kind of time difference between the attacker moving and the defender moving. Go no sen: If you wait for the attack, then block or dodge, then counter after the attack has finished. (hard initiative or machi no sen waiting initiative) ...


7

Ki (気) does mean "energy" or "mood", but the A (合) is just a shout of enthusiasm (Korean does use the energy+join setup with K'ihap), so no, there's nothing mystical about it any more than a sports team breaking their huddle by shouting something like, "go team!"


6

First we might want to define 'root'. 'Root' is simply the ability to resist a push. This is most often done in "internal arts" as a 'relaxed' manner and paired with the not loosing of one's balance when/if the other quickly withdraws their pushing force. The Tai Chi Classics (TCC) say "Rooted in the feet" to express the idea that the feet are the base, ...


6

In Germany those two refer to different things but that is a special case: Jiu-Jitsu in Germany is usually used for the traditional japanese system and related styles while Ju-Jutsu is used for a system developed in the 1960s for German police forces. So in Germany those two are different but that does only hold for Germany because everywhere else the German ...


6

In the text, he explains the origin of this term. And he points out that it's his word, not something the Japanese would say: When I commenced to teach jujitsu in Yokohama, Japan, in every trick I showed how to use the lower abdomen, and how to maneuver opponent's balance. My first pupils were Japanese friends, and lower abdomen to them was shita ...


6

The Oxford dictionary defines martial art as Various sports, which originated chiefly in Japan, Korea, and China as forms of self-defence or attack, such as judo, karate, and kendo. Merriam Webster defines martial art as any one of several forms of fighting and self-defense (such as karate and judo) that are widely practiced as sports And finally, ...


6

TL;DR I'm recommending "Step Up" as a replacement phrase. The other phrases I include are contextual, and some do not have the exact intent of "Man up". I kinda got carried away with phrases that might fit in the same slot as "Man up". For clarity, I understand "Man up" to mean that the person needs to recognize that their barriers are mental and do what ...


6

You are mixing world religions and confusing Chinese chi with Japanese ki. This is problematic. They are different interpretations of mystical force. Since you used the term "kiai" I will speak from the Japanese interpretation since kiai is a Japanese word. The usage and meaning of kiai varies depending on context and origin. The Japanese have many ...


6

Excerpt of Canonical Answer This quotation is attributed to Kyuzo Mifune on page 162 of Kodokan Judo: Throwing Techniques by Toshiro Daigo. Sweeping is similar to brushing an extremely light object away. When hooking, you execute the technique as if pulling a rooted plant out from the ground. Reaping is similar to the movement of reaping and cutting off a ...


5

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...


5

If the image below describes the technique accurately, I would say it is because uke's legs form a wheel (or a circle) in the air. However, I have no official source for this.


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