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14

There are many reasons for this. Boxers use oil/vaseline to make their bodies more slippery. Obviously doesn't work in a tank-top. 12-rounds of boxing against 8/10oz gloves would end up wrecking an olympic style tank top really fast. Something would go loose, and there would have to be breaks in the fight. You don't want to hit anything that is not just the ...


14

From the origin of belts and gis themselves: Kano apparently began the custom of having his yudansha wear black obi (belts) in 1886. These obi weren't the belts karateka and judoka wear today -- Kano hadn't invented the judogi (Judo uniform) yet, and his students were still practicing in kimono. They were the wide obi still worn with formal kimono. In ...


13

In Brazilian jiu-jitsu with a gi you wear the funny Asian pajamas. In no-gi Brazilian jiu-jitsu you wear shorts and usually a t-shirt or rash-guard top. You can grab onto the funny pajamas but you can't grab onto any clothes in no-gi. The gi absorbs sweat, adds friction, and provides a wide variety of grips to choke, throw, and control from. Often the ...


7

Karate adopted the white uniforms of judo in the early 20th century for two complementary reasons: to increase its appeal to mainland Japan already familiar with its use in Judo as part of the requirements to be recognised as an official martial art by the Dai-Nippon Butokukai, an umbrella organisation seeking to regularise martial arts licencing and ...


7

Honestly, it seems to be largely tradition (with said tradition basically stemming back to a fashion trend in the aristocracy), with many practitioners pointing out that it creates a tripping hazard. The two main benefits I have seen people cite: It hides your footwork - This is sometimes cited as the reason why the samurai wore them, so that opponents ...


7

In descending order of importance, here are reasons why your attire matters: Range of motion Uniforms are cut to provide range of motion for the joints. Skinny jeans and Western-style suit jackets restrict your range of motion in ways that loose-fitting or stretchable clothing do not. The manner in which clothing is worn also matters. If you wear your ...


6

tl; dr Buy what the other people in your club buy. There are variations from brand to brand and art to art. I've done aikido in an aikidogi, a judogi and a karategi; none of them really affect my technique; they do affect my comfort. The big issue is how well it fits, and how reliable the brand is at selling equipment that fits. When I wear through my ...


6

Instead of doing a 'simple' belt knot, I use a variant where you put the ends of the belt between the two layers of the belt while doing the knot. This picture: shows how to do it starting with the upper end, I prefer starting with the one coming from below, but it does not make much of a difference. I've been introduced to this method as 'kata-knot' in ...


5

When translating foreign technique names, sometimes there isn't a perfect analogue in the target language e.g. "tomoe" in tomoe-nage translated as 'circle'. The "kesa" (袈裟) in kesa-gatame in fact refers to a type of buddhist robe, the Kāṣāya. While historically it was worn covering both shoulders, in current Japanese Buddhist style it is wrapped across the ...


5

For me, the hakama simply belongs to the art. At my dojo, people are encouraged to wear the hakama as soon as they decide that they are going to make Aikido a siginificant part of their life, i.e., as soon as they are positive that they will attend regularly for a long time. Or in other words, we spare people the issue of investing the money and then having ...


4

When I first started training, I was expected to learn about the history of Karate and answer questions regarding the colours and symbols of our uniforms. One such question was: "Why is our gi white?" I believe that what I was taught goes well with what a previous poster stated: "The white uniform represented the values of purity, avoidance of ego, and ...


4

Take it to a dry cleaners that does repairs/alterations of clothes etc. They have really good sewing machines that get through the thick fabric.


4

Does particular traditional attire affect the ability to learn and perform martial arts? In small ways, yes. Safety & comfort: Kicking techniques need parts with lots of extra material around the groin, and some bagginess and/or stretchiness around the hips and legs, so they don't snap taught in unpleasant places as the legs are driven apart for a ...


4

Not a knot style answer, but once you've tied the knot, rather than just pulling the loose ends, grasp the ENDS of the belt firmly, bring your hands together, then pull apart as hard as you can. This creates a tighter and more secure knot. Source - retying belts for kids just about every class.


4

There are two common ways of tying a belt. The simpler is by wrapping one side under in a loop and then tying a simple knot with both ends: However in my experience this style is prone to coming loose, especially in BJJ and ne-waza. The second technique is more stable during rolling/randori: The following video illustrates both versions: How to Tie Your ...


4

Assuming you're talking about Japanese martial arts and Hachimaki, it's basically a matter of tradition that might be based off of samurai helmets and padding against cuts. These days, it's more ceremonial, and sometimes a method of advertising (hachimaki with slogans are passed out at trade shows), but they do still work to keep sweat out of your eyes. ...


3

One major reason for the change (in addition to making refereeing easier) was to make judo more appealing to TV audiences, and in this the IJF explicitly disavows any responsibility to adhere to Japanese aesthetic or traditional values (and hence no pressure to consider e.g. indigo): As the birthplace of judo is Japan, the techniques and spirit of judo ...


3

Certain schools or teachers might require certain attire or practitioners prefer to dress and look a certain way, perhaps like a hero of theirs. But your question asks about attire affecting 'ability to learn and perform'. I can think of a few examples of this - in judo and karate, the uniform and belt are often grasped and may aid throws and techniques, ...


2

I'm a huge critic of the hakama, and of its related bane - sawari-waza. I've been given many reasons over the years, from fashion, history, tradition, hiding footwork, managing strides... In the end, I look at it as practical as the human appendix: we all have one, no one knows why, but you better care for it or else. I'm in Aikido for self-defense. I ...


2

When I started training in Taekwondo, it was explained to me that we all wore a dobok (training suit) to help us remember/understand that: Everyone is equal We're all part of the same school/organisation We're all on the same/similar journey The waters are muddied somewhat when the black belts have a slightly different uniform. Black belt doboks have black ...


2

Going against the flow here, I would say that some traditional outfits actively hinder in developing your skills. For example, in Shodokan Aikido, we do not wear a hakama. The main reason is safety: you and/or your partner can get tangled in it making injuries more likely to happen. This is especially true during randori-ho. Some urban myth started that the ...


2

The tabs at the end of BJJ belts have not historically been worn on one side in particular. Some schools may have a style they prefer, with possible rationalizations for them (e.g. following on from the left-over-right positioning of the kimono jacket), but this will be a recently invented tradition and is not consistent between schools nor even individual ...


2

Once I bought some black fabric and gave a tailor exact instructions on what to do, so that's doable. But that only saved a few dollars over ordering a ready-made black-trimmed top from the place my Grand Master uses for uniforms.


1

Hakama are traditional horse-riding pants and come in a number of styles. They were worn in Aikido because back when Morihei Ueshiba began teaching, it was part of traditional clothing, and not wearing one would be akin nowadays to going around in your underwear. Presently, to the best of my knowledge, they are most often seen in Aikikai from either 3rd ...


1

To put an answer on this one, I believe the consensus is that it is "tradition" of the culture/style with which it originated. As this was asked on Jun 17 2015 I doubt anyone will find a more exact answer or why the tradition was to put it on the left specifically. If anyone finds the reason this tradition was started please update with an answer, but alot ...


1

"Gi" refers to the uniform that is worn during most martial arts practice. Nogi means that you do not wear one, and instead wear shorts or spats and a rash guard or you are shirtless. There are a few differences when talking about gi vs. nogi when executing techniques. For gi: Gis provide friction that may make it easier OR harder to escape or change ...


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