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7

As you suspect, using a carabiner like this will only damage your hand. Even brass knuckles are bad for your hand. But if you want to find out for yourself, you can just try it on a punching bag. Go very light and then gradually increase the power. You probably won't get very far before you realize that the carabiner will just rotate in your hand, causing it ...


5

Yes. Contrary to what the average "expert" on swords and Japanese swordsmanship will tell you online (along with their obligatory mentions to Miyamoto Musashi who everyone obligatorily must mention whenever dual-wielding Japanese swords is discussed even though in his own book he clearly states using two swords is nothing new in Japan and there ...


4

In most cases, sword flex is only for the sake of durability and excessive flexibility is likely to interfere with doing proper damage with your blade. A major exception is the urumi, or "whip blade", where that flexibility is used to use it as more of a "soft weapon", able to make more use of centrifugal momentum and to curve around ...


4

Steve Weigand pretty much nailed the important bits about potentially damaging your own hand with something like this, but here's a little addition: in an actual street fight/self-defense situation, you REALLY, really, don't want to essentially tie your four, non-thumb fingers together. Not all bad guys are going to stand face to face with you and exchange ...


2

It makes little sense to use a carabiner as illustrated in the video, as explained in existing answers. It may occasionally make some sense to hold and use one in another way: placing it in your palm and wrapping the fingers and thumbs over it, such that the "fat end" projects slightly from the little-finger side of the palm. This will give you a ...


2

There are two types of steel, hard steel and soft steel. The purpose of hard steel is edge retention. The purpose of soft steel is absorbing shock. The purpose of blade flex is so the sword does not shatter on the first strike. Here's the most basic thing about swords, ANY SWORD, no matter the culture. When they hit too many hard things, they stop being ...


1

What is "right" will depend on how you're using the nunchaku. When I was taught basic usage in Chun Kuk Do, we gripped the nunchaku about one fist width from the top. Being close to the chain reduces the "wobble" of the top of the stick you're holding and reduces the chance of the the stick getting slick with sweat and sliding out of your ...


1

A kubotan can be hugely effective, but punching with it in the manner of a roll of quarters is not recommended because you're likely to hurt your hand. Kubotans are effective because of physics—puts all the force into a small surface area capable of delivering a definitive strike. The best method to use a kubotan practically is to use a backhanded grip, a ...


1

I talked about these kinds of things and briefly referred to kubotan keychains in my answer below: Is it effective to use a carabiner as tool in real fight? That question specifically asked about using a carabiner. I also talked about brass knuckles. My overall opinion of these kinds of self-defense weapons is that they're nearly useless and often do either ...


1

I don't practice Iaido or Kendo myself, but I will have a stab at answering this. As Iaido is often practised Solo this is perhaps one of the few styles that could be learned with minimal input from an instructor. Kendo would be much harder to learn in this way as it is a pair form style with blunt sword substitutes and is designed for competition in ...


1

I think I know what you are asking about. I recommend long range (10-feet plus) telescopic selfie stick. Aluminium, not fancy hi-tech materials. When folded down it amounts to 20-30 inches, and it feels sturdy enough for rough treatment.


1

No. Nope. Definitely not. No. No. Just.... No. If you're going to dual wield anything in your off-hand, use a buckler. Manga, anime, movies and video game tropes are worthless in actual combat. Every warrior culture wielding melee arms throughout history have always, without fail gravitated to pole-arms (re: spears) and shields. The republic Roman army did ...


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