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I was always taught Tongbeiquan (通背拳) is effective for multi-opponent situations, although the wiki only mentions two person sparring. "Tong Bei" is considered exotic, even in Chinese wushu because the techniques are highly unique, distinct from the contemporary core of Shaolin (here "northern boxing") and Hun Ga ("southern boxing&...


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Just wanted to preface this, I've been sparring since around age 6, and all testings require a 1v2 to 1v5 versus the national team members, so please take what I say with a grain of salt. Whenever you're attacked on the street, your first priority should be getting out of there. Most attacks can be random, after provoking some drunk guy, but practice fight ...


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The bagua strategy outline for fighting multiple opponents: Fight standing up. Always move, forwardish. Your back is hardest to defend, and against multiple opponents it is not possible to always face all opponents. Make it more difficult by not presenting a stationary target. Don't expect to be able to stand in one place and turn around without getting hit....


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Steve's answer raises a bunch of good points which already cover a lot what I would have to say on martial arts as well, so I would like to have this answer to be understood as complementary. About multiple opponents in martial arts Generally, martial arts rarely train multi-opponent situations. Aikido does so on higher levels, but as already said, this is ...


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The question asks if there are martial arts that do better at multiple opponent fights than other martial arts. My simple answer is: No. The more nuanced answer is: There is some truth in what many martial arts teach for multiple attacker situations, but it's generally unrealistic and not very practical. I'll explain why in a moment. It's hard enough ...


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