9

The speed increase from kicking with ankle weights and then removing them doesn't demonstrate any improvement. It demonstrates that it's easier to kick correctly and quickly without adding resistance. The fact that the kicks feel faster than before using the weights doesn't prove anything. Don't kick with ankle weights. If you want stronger legs, then use ...


5

If you have a limited amount of time for training in class and a surplus of energy, your best bets for supplemental training are strength, power, conditioning, mobility, and judicious use of technique or movement work. Essentially, your primary goal in your free time is to become a supremely athletic physical specimen. Strength and power You should develop ...


5

You should do basic strength training using progressive overload, at a slower rate than someone who is not simultaneously working hard at karate. After you've built a base of strength through weight training, you should add some explosive movements so you can utilize your newfound strength to produce speed and power. Basically, this means you should do basic ...


4

Forgive me for my input here. 45 years ago when I started my training and was wrestling with the same issues, my Sensei took me aside and taught, Spend 2 hours on speed drills for every hour spent on weights. Weight training makes you powerful but slow. To increase speed do the following: A. Candles punches, stop 5" or 1 fist width short; kicks for at ...


4

Power in your punches comes from; muscle to generate force, correct shifting of weight/movement, and coordination and technique to get the most of that (alignment of structure, correct angle of attack, timing, etc.). If you want more muscle to generate force, you need to do some kind of resistance training - that can be weights, it could be resistance ...


4

Quote from your message: "The dojo is rife with injuries." Find a different dojo. Seriously. In this I agree with Sardathrion. In your reaction to him you state: "...but even the teachers are quite injured. It's the culture." All the more reason to leave and never go back there.


3

First and foremost: The dojo is rife with injuries. [...] This should be ringing many alarm bells. This is a sign of a bad teacher and a Mc Dojo. Get out and never come back before it is too late! You only have one body and when it gets injured, it never fully recovers. Keep good care of it. Any dojo who state that you should "power through the injuries"...


3

There are two schools of thought based on two distinct principles as to how to generate a punch with maximum effectiveness. In schools similar to karate the force comes from pushing after you connect with the target. Someone punching in this manner will train to strengthen their muscles in order to apply more force. These punches have reletively short ...


3

Yes, you are correct in assuming that you will lose your balance if you get used to the heavy ankle weight on your supporting leg. But that being said, the best way of increasing strength and speed is to do resistance and interval training in a gym. Ankle weights put lots of unnecessary strain on your knees. And your knees are already a weak spot as it is. ...


3

Weight training can be beneficial, and some martial arts have a set of supplementary exercises (in Okinawa Goju Ryu we call it Hojo Undo) where you use tools like Chi'ishi (stone on a stick), Ishi-sashi (stone handles - ancient type of Kettle bell) and Nigiri Gamen (a couple of vases with necks in a size to fit a palm) for weight training. The advantage of ...


2

Strength training alongside of doing your martial art of choice is key. I've pumped my training from 1 hour to 2 hours every day and over 1 month I've increased 10 fold in my technique and power. This is all alongside my strength training of 1 to 5 reps max and it works


2

Dave gave a great answer. I would add for speed training : you can practice your techniques (punching and kicking) shadow boxing with light weights in you hands. Say 3-5 pounds. Don't forget to never fully extend your arms and legs when trainign with weights So you can do a couple of rounds of : one round shadow boxing with weights and then one round ...


2

Muscle strength improves by resistance to an intended movement. For punches, there's a few tricks that work well. Light Weights When I say light, I mean ounces. You might want to take a fishing weight or stones to use. Lay on your back, do your chain punches with the weights in your hands. Laying on your back means gravity is pulling the weight in the ...


2

Regarding punch power Some basic physics together with some thoughts on punches and kicks may help: [impulse] = [mass] × [velocity] It is much better to improve speed by technique (!) and exercises (which may include weight training, but as I take it in another sense than you think of it) than weight, if you want to hit harder: Becoming heavier ...


1

Just start a strength and conditioning program normally. Aikido is far from the strenuous end of the activity spectrum, and genetically-average amateurs find the way to weight train alongside just about everything. Make a slight allowance for Aikido crowding out lifting time and recovery resources, but just do it. If injuries or immobile joints are in the ...


1

It is physically correct with greater weight and muscle power you will definitely be having a greater impact while punching. The greater weight will have a greater momentum as soon as the muscles give you the speed the impact will be doubled. momentum = mass X velocity Muscle Power is more important than weight, as heavier bodies are much more difficult to ...


1

I prefer using (and recommending) isometric exercise for strength training. Anecdotally, I've experienced far fewer injuries using isometric resistance than I have using free weights (and I have been training for almost 30 years now). Speed is a function of several factors: raw synaptic response times, efficiency of movement, preparedness (mental and ...


1

Improve speed, technique and strength. For speed! Go through Kihon techs as fast as you can. For instance, throw out Jodan Masashi Geri while maintaining balance and technique in quick rapid succession. For overall strength! Lots of heavy bag work. Try different combinations. Technique! Total body flexibility training. Spend a lot of your time ...


1

I have been training Muay Thai for over 6 years and the only supplements I used were protein shakes/bars, creatine and vitamins. Nowadays I don't even use much of these since I figured out that a proper diet is the best vehicle to achieve a good performance in the gym. I wrote a little post about it. Take a look, you may find something useful: http://www....


1

First of all I want to make myself clear that I a not intending to hurt anyone's feelings or trying to prove one is better than the other. Myself 32 years old. Black belt Karate. Black belt judo. Wing chun kung fu 1 year, free style wrestling 1 year and Boxing experience in amature league for 2 years. And currently studying an ancient Indian martial arts ...


1

I've had a solid 2 years of strength training including Olympic weightlifting before starting martial arts, which I've pursued for over ten years since my first real fight. Strength training for minimum two years is a must for adding the necessary bulk to compete in fighting at a high level, but to really stand-out, you need weightlifting. That's why I was a ...


1

Isolating the triceps will not be very effective. The most effective way to train is through functional exercises, in which more than one muscle must work together against resistance in a way that is similar to how the technique will actually be used. Let me list a few exercises we use (some mentioned already). To increase power: Resistance bands: we hold ...


1

Weight training is fantastic for martial arts training, but you have to do it with a goal in mind. Ask yourself which areas you need to improve strengthwise, which areas have muscles that you will use (directly or indirectly) in practicing your techniques. Also, if you do a sport like Taekwondo, keep in mind that, contrary to popular belief, while muscles ...


1

I have found that strength training once a week and power endurance once a week alongside BJJ, Thai boxing, boxing and JKD concepts helps a lot in my fitness and strength; however, if I do strength or power endurance more than once a week, I slow down and burn out. Everyone's body reacts differently; spreading my training out over a period of time makes a ...


1

I would say show me the science....I have done bodybuilding types of workouts for years along side my martial arts (Grappling, Hapkido and Krav Maga) and building some mass and muscle density have only helped with every art. It has given me strength, power and endurance. I think the key is is variety and changing up how you train. There are tons of freaky ...


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