24

Wing chun doesn't have to be bad for this school to be bad for you. It sounds like you're not comfortable there. I think you should stop training with these people.


22

Wing Chun is uncommon in MMA for three major reasons. First, its practitioners generally shun sparring. Second, its practitioners generally shun realistic wrestling, throwing, and groundwork practice. Third, the skill Wing Chun focuses the most time on – hand trapping – is a small part of fighting in general, and is easily overshadowed by boxing or clinch ...


18

I like the other answers here. Let me just add my take on this subject. I hope I don't offend anyone here. Talking about a style's weaknesses is often a hot button subject. Wing Chun was developed with a particular purpose in mind. And that was to train someone as quickly as possible to be able to fight people who were trained in traditional kung-fu arts ...


14

Protecting yourself from bullying has more to do about confidence than about martial arts. Learning martial arts will raise your confidence, but coming across as unsure and uncertain, even if you're a grandmaster, will still get you bullied. Because of that reason, the style of kungfu matters less. The club you go to and your trainer matters more. Make sure ...


13

Source: Black Belt in Ju Jitsu First, I completely agree that learning to fight won't fix your problem; it'll probably just get you into trouble. However, learning a martial art is a great way to build confidence and THAT can definitely help with the bullying (speaking from experience here). One thing to note though, is that NO martial art is "fast and ...


11

Well, to start off, punching someone in the head is potentially harmful to the puncher. Skulls are made out of hard bone with few flat surfaces and several angles, which increases the risk of breaking your knuckles on contact. And that's if you're lucky enough to not make contact with something like the teeth, and also suffer additional lacerations. Frankly, ...


10

Orthodox wing chun focuses on "trapping" range, between striking range and the clinch. Within many schools' live training (sparring) there is often virtually no throwing, no shots, very little clinch work or kicking, and punching or other hand strikes are often only trained once contact has been made, leaving long-range boxing untrained. The style has ...


10

Do you have a bad Wing Chun teacher? I don't know, as it really does not sound at all like Wing Chun. Going back to its roots, Wing Chun is actually named for one of the early female practitioners of the art. It emphasizes techniques where the user flows around the enemy, as it is expected that the WC user would lose when facing an opponent head-on (...


8

Some techniques and training do not stress the joints, others do. It depends on the martial art, the teacher and the kind of training. For example, a lot of judoka end up with bad knees. Likewise a lot of capoeira folks end up with back injuries. Joint damage can be understood in 3 factors: Too much stress, bad applied If you try to do too much force ...


7

There are four distances at which we fight: Long range. You'll need to perform a jumping attack to close the distance. punching range. I'll lump kicking in here for simplicity. close quarters. This is where Wing Chun is very effective. grappling. Basically anything that is NOT close quarters fighting would be logically effective, but I wouldn't face a ...


7

This depends on your particular school, because sash color and rank are not standardized across Wing Chun schools. Even in the same branch of Wing Chun, your school may have a different tradition than other schools in the same branch. Very simply, if your school of Wing Chun has everyone wearing the same color sash, then that means that sash color is not ...


6

The stance with the feet pointed inwards is known as Yee Jee Kim Yeung Ma & may be referred to as the "Pigeon-Toed" or "Goat riding" stance. It is a stance that is developed under the foundational form called Siu Nim Tao. This form is typically found in the Yip Man heritage schools (note there are other Wing Chun variations) which was popularized by ...


6

The question is: What martial arts are similar to Wing Chun? The question does seem like it is open to interpretation. It depends on which aspects of Wing Chun you're looking at. But without going into every permutation of different attributes, I want to cut to the chase and mention one martial art that comes to my mind the most. That would be Southern ...


6

There is good kung-fu and bad kung-fu. The same is true with all martial arts. You can spot the difference when you have enough experience. I disagree that kung-fu in general is messy or sloppy. If you're seeing unfocused strikes and movement that seems like it's weak and uncoordinated, then you're probably watching poorly done kung-fu. And there is a lot of ...


5

I agree with Dave Liepmann, that the only real way to learn a martial art is to have a teacher who can guide you. And you need to do it two or three times a week. But, let me offer a small amount of hope for you to learn wing-chun if you have no teacher present and no school around. If I was in your situation, and I knew that wing-chun was the only martial ...


5

Find and enroll in a wing chun school, then in a year test your skills in a full-contact competition. Tutorials are for learning how to set up your programming development environment. YouTube channels are for entertainment. Neither are training. Training is becoming an athlete by working out, learning skills, and entering competitions.


5

Hsing I (Xing Yi) is a direct and to the point efficient kung fu system not overly dependent on muscular strength. Its goal is to close the gap and seize the opponent's ground. It is an internal art. I Liq Chuan is also a very interesting art with sticky hands practice. These would be my choices in addition to Wing Chun.


5

Fighting will not solve your problem Learning how to fight will not help. It will take too long, land you in trouble with the law/school, and even if you succeed at becoming a fighter, all you achieve would be to turn yourself into a bully. Using weapons is an even worst idea! Leave knives, shives, and bats at home. You can cause serious harm to yourself ...


5

Wing Chun/Jeet Kun Do. It originated (according to legend) as a style for women and has a focus on efficiency rather than strength. That answers the question, but the solution, I think .. is to gain weight and muscle mass. Honestly, you can spend the same amount of time learning martial arts and try to use it in a fight - or - just bulk up and more likely ...


5

Let's keep in mind that your goal is safety. Depending on what kind of danger you are facing, martial arts may, or may not help. First, consider if there are any adults who you can turn to for help. There may be legal or school problems on top of the bullies, so having someone with the ability to navigate that and help you stay safe and find the best ...


5

This is a perfect example to demonstrate the importance of getting out of the way of a line of attack, which is no doubt a martial arts concept. Surprisingly, it's not taught all the time, as evidenced by cheesy self-defense demonstrations. Your position should be off the line of attack. Move side to side, or upward if you are so inclined to use ...


5

One hell of a question. The faster the car's going the less practical any options will be. While my training doesn't cover such things, for the sake of offering something to write I'll list what comes to mind. The interesting situation is when there's just too little time to move outside the line of the sides of the vehicle: when I studied hapkido we ...


4

Bleeding is a big deal. You are damaging yourself and that is bad. You should wear protective gear, improve your technique, and punch less hard. In addition, I hope you clean all the biohazard that you leaked on the bag...


4

Wear protection Cant stress this enough Irrespective of what some schools may teach, it is detrimental to you and your well being to constantly increase your tenacity in hopes that your body would get "used to it" someday. Train smart. Master technique. If your body deteriorates, you have lost your primary weapon. Take care of your body at all ...


4

A few things I've noticed from a little striking sparring against wing chun guys... a fast jab around their guard, slightly from the side and arcing as is natural for a side-on fighter, surprisingly worked really well as long as I didn't do it so much that it became predictable their stance is frontal and shallow (from front toe to back heel), so they have ...


4

The style matters less than who is teaching it. The same style can be taught very differently by different people. I would look for location first: your dojo/gym/training place should be within easy travel distance of where you are. I would say less than an hour's drive (both ways) but that might vary depending on how much you generally travel. Secondly, ...


4

You can learn some forms and some strikes from watching video... but you won't learn the stuff that makes Wing Chun effective from video. A lot of Wing Chun's strength is sensitivity to the opponent, adapting to trap their arms, and force generation at short range. The problem, too, is that you might see "I put my arm here" when you copy the form, but you ...


4

This answer makes the assumption that you're talking about reaching down to block low kicks with your arms, which your question seems to indicate. In Wing Chun, the rule of thumb is that the hands address anything above the waist, and kicks anything below the waist, with some overlap in the groin region. If the kick is coming at your head you should be ...


4

I've been practicing Wing Chun (Wang Kiu lineage) for over a year now...having just been introduced a little to sparring with kicks allowed, I tend to try to automatically block kicks with my arms. Emphasis mine. This is your problem. Flinchy reactions to normal attacks is caused by either A) not knowing what to do or B) not sparring enough under ...


4

Things that recommend Wing Chun to a sailor: It is sometimes commented that Wing Chun is best suited for fighting in a telephone booth. This is not so far from the truth. Wing Chun specializes in close-quarters tactics at bent-arm range/trapping range (though I assure you it does possess long-range techniques and tactics). This would be well-suited to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible