15

I want to be able to be prepared against any kind of opponent. You are looking for a unicorn there. No martial art whatsoever is able to do that. There is no ultimate fighting art. That said, most martial arts (McDojo excluded) can give you an edge in self defence. It will shift the odds in your favour which is a good thing. However, self defence is not ...


14

Long story short, they wanted to drop one sport so that they could add another, and they cited low ticket sales, low popularity, low TV ratings, and a lack of oversight and diversity. The board voted after reviewing a report by the IOC program commission that analyzed 39 criteria, including TV ratings, ticket sales, anti-doping policy and global ...


11

A common precaution is to wear wrestling headgear, which is designed to protect the ears, while practicing. Cauliflower ear is caused by impacts or rubbing on the ear. Headgear will reduce both of these.


11

Today we focused on some details of escaping mount. This involves controlling the opponent's hips with your arms. Good luck doing that in a MMA fight when your head is being caved in with ground and pound. Being under mount is bad. There's no rule that says that you can escape without exposing yourself to strikes or submissions. Saying "I want to escape ...


10

Television and movies give people impressions of things that are never corrected. What is the first thing an American thinks of when they hear "wrestling"? World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), which is definitely more entertainment, showmanship, and athleticism than wrestling or martial art. Wrestlers are enormous muscled men who jump off the ringside and ...


9

Wrestling isn't often seen as a martial art because it has been primarily pushed as a sport - much in the same way most people don't consider archery, javelin, or shot put, as war arts, though those are clearly origins for those sports. However, one of the benefits of having achieved mainstream status is that it is not in danger of dying out or losing a ...


7

TL;DR Mass is one of the most important aspects of winning sumo bouts. More detail The most prominent physical requirement, at least in Japanese sumo, is height. In 1994, the Japanese Sumo Association required that all sumo wrestlers be a minimum 1.73 m (5'8") in height. Past that, there is no weight class. Since the other rules, such as prohibiting a ...


7

"I'm trying to diet and exercise properly to reach my low body fat goal. (..)" That said, boxing is the way to go. The workout is quite intense, because you need to build stamina in order to box properly. "Also, I want to learn some basic self defense" For self defense, i would include Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu as well, since it has proven its effectiveness (...


7

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


7

Fake professional wrestling grew out of one of the oldest martial arts tradition: the challenge match. Chinese martial artists sometimes fought on the lei tai to establish dominance over teach martial arts in an area: ...and it was common in feudal Japan for students of one school to invade another school and demand a match. Fighting is at the heart of ...


6

I studied judo and many other martial arts. I've never studied wrestling. Personally, I feel like it's perhaps less helpful to a new student to try to explain things in terms they understand already. It's usually best to approach it like they have absolutely no knowledge and start from there, just like you do with every student. Otherwise you assume they ...


6

On youtube, this is titled Jouko Salomäki vs. Hans Fell. In this match, you should notice that there is a huge skill disparity between the smaller man and the bigger man. The bigger man is uncomfortable and never actually produces an attack. There are no magic techniques that will make small people win against big people. As I pointed out in my answer to ...


6

Foot sweeps Assuming that your objective is to put the opponent on the ground and not actually lift them, foot sweeps are the throw that will work for the greatest size disparity. Foot sweeps work on the principle of attacking your opponent's foot at the instant they are changing weight on a foot, either lifting it up or placing it down. At this instant, ...


5

In direct competition between wrestlers and jiu jitsu players, you run into the problem of differences in rule sets. For example: Jiu jitsu players do not consider back exposure alone to be bad position and will very commonly attack from positions with back exposure. The guard position is a scoring position for the top player in wrestling if there is back ...


5

TL; DR: It has to do with the fact that they have separate international governing bodies (see breakdown below). The Olympics have a tiered classification system, that can be a bit confusing if you look at each different thing as a "sport", like you would for general consideration. These tiers are: Sport - Top tier, and there are limitations on the number ...


5

Grappling is a more generic, umbrella term than wrestling. Striking from a Muay Thai clinch, for example, is part grappling but not wrestling. Standard disclaimers apply, however, that people use words differently and in ways that disagree.


5

Fundamentally, they are both combat sports that involve grappling and pinning. However, the rules result in different focuses in technique. In Judo, your points are based on the performance of a throw from a specified list of allowable techniques, and of subsequent control of your opponent. In Wrestling, you win by pinning your opponent, or forcing them out ...


5

It is much easier to learn a proper technique to get out of mount in the first place and adapting it to MMA environment afterwards. One shouldn't learn things doing it in half-measures. It seems you have not yet understood the main premises of BJJ, which hold in MMA as well: 1. Position before submission When you are in a weak position - like being mounted - ...


5

The question asks why some martial arts exist when others are more complete. The answer is: The rule set. It always goes back to the rules. Why something looks the way it does depends on the rule set. Change the rules even a little, and the way a martial art looks can change quite a lot. Do the rules require a gi? Big difference between that style and one ...


4

There is no magic against "any kind of opponent," because your opponents are so potentially varied. Some are armed; others not. Some are individuals; others are groups or gangs. Some are simply angry; others are (pardon the now-obsolete psychological phrasing) psychopaths. Some are your drunk uncle Eddie, who you don't want to hurt, but you can't have him ...


4

Go to each school in your area and take a few lessons in each to find the one that you will stick with and agrees with you mentally and physically. Once you start back on that road you will mature and your goals will change.


4

Judo Kibisu gaeshi The major point in descriptions of kibisu gaeshi is grabbing and reaping of the heel with a hand. The suggested applications of Kibisu gaeshi include continuations both from a seoi nage feint as well as a when your opponent dodges seoi nage by circling towards your front. It also used to be a common continuation from uchi mata, when the ...


4

According to the Canadian Amateur Wrestling Association, which I think follows the same rules as the Olympics: A wrestler can choose to compete in the next higher weight class, except for the heaviest weight class, where the wrestler must weigh the minimum weight listed in this rulebook. The decision to change a weight class cannot be made after the ...


4

Quite frankly, there is no objective difference between the two, so it's more likely simply a distinction created by your teacher. Most likely, he's differentiating between Western techniques one might see in amateur Greco-Roman wrestling, and grappling techniques seen in something like Brazilian Jujitsu.


4

Wrestling may be one of many forms of wrestling: folk, Greco-Roman, freestyle, catch, submission, sumo, etc. Because there are so many styles of wrestling, it's difficult to make blanket statements about them. Judo refers to Kodokan Judo, which was founded in Japan by Jigaro Kano in the late 1800's. I am not aware of any other system that uses the word ...


4

The premise of the question is either incomprehensible or flat wrong. BJJ purple+ belts can pin and immobilize just about any untrained person. In the other direction, it's been shown time and again that you can show any accomplished wrestler a guillotine and rear naked choke and a month later they're submission machines. Grappling arts are not so distinct ...


4

The scissors-kick or Kani Basami (judo) is often done in case one of the throws you tried failed. If you don't succeed, you'll end up falling to the ground in a potentially vulnerable position. And a quick warning: Kani Basami has been banned in competition Judo. There is an elevated risk of knee injury to the one receiving the throw. You can google to read ...


3

As always, you can't compare style A with style B and say either one is better. It's not because you're a boxer, you immediately win agains a wing chun practitioner. It all depends on how good both fighters are, how much experience they got fighting opponents of different styles, the competition's rules (eg. if you pit a judoka vs. a taekwondo, and rules ...


3

There are no specific physical requirements for sumo. The rules and culture of sumo reward being as big and strong as possible. There is no benefit to being lean or cutting body fat, so rikishi (sumo wrestlers) simply don't. They get brutally strong, and have simply enormous muscles hidden under their fat. Many pro sumo wrestlers match or exceed the muscle ...


3

If the opponent is balancing on only a single knee to pin you down, the easiest way out is definitely rolling. First slowly bring your elbows in toward your torso and use your forearms as frames between you and the ground, do the same with your knees. We need a small amount of space between us and the ground for leverage to roll. Once our wedges are in place ...


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