brazofuerte
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When was throwing introduced to martial arts?
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15 votes

Earliest examples of wrestling Wrestling has been a part of most societies since time-immemorial: Fresco in tomb 15 at Beni Hasan, Egypt ca. 2,000 BC. The earliest known historical European ...

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Ju-jutsu vs Jiu-jitsu?
15 votes

"Ju-jutsu" and "jiu-jitsu" are different romanizations of the same Japanese word(s) 柔術. This is analogous to how we have both "Qur'an" and "Koran" from the ...

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De-ashi-harai or De-ashi-barai?
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12 votes

In Japanese, some6 initial consonants become voiced when they occur internal to some5 compound words, e.g: (unvoiced) (voiced) kimono judo-gi koshi-guruma o-goshi katame-waza kesa-gatame shime-...

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What Level Of Expertise Did Theodore Roosevelt Have In Judo?
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9 votes

Roosevelt's Judo experience Roosevelt trained judo under two instructors (John O'Brien, and Yoshiaki Yamashita) for a period of around a few months each in 1902 and 1904. He maintained an interest in ...

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What is this name of this kind of joint lock?
8 votes

This appears to be a hammerlock or "chicken wing", held with only one hand for ostensibly artistic purposes i.e. to imply Sherlock is so skilled he only needs to utilise a very small amount ...

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Are omoplatas legal in judo?
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8 votes

Yes, omoplatas are considered a variant of ashi-gatame or hiza-gatame.1 3 The IJF Referee Commission has confirmed their legality on multiple occasions,1 2 both as a submission, and as a method of ...

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Risk of head injuries or cognitive impairment from training BJJ?
8 votes

Head injuries in Judo and possible differences between Judo and BJJ The studies1 quoted in this answer about head and neck injuries in judo come to the conclusion that: severe injuries in judo are ...

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How are chokes/strangles classified in Judo?
7 votes

Below is a list of chokes and how they fall into the 12 current Kodokan shime-waza classifications. Note that like with certain throws, there is often debate as to whether certain choke applications ...

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Why are traditional karate gis white?
7 votes

Karate adopted the white uniforms of judo in the early 20th century for two complementary reasons: to increase its appeal to mainland Japan already familiar with its use in Judo as part of the ...

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Why were leg-locks removed from Judo?
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7 votes

Leg-locks were banned shortly after an 1899 exhibition match in Kyoto (held before Emperor Taishō) between Kodokan 3rd dan Yuji Hirooka and Fusen-ryū master Mataemon Tanabe. During the match Tanabe ...

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What does "create a frame" mean?
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6 votes

It means to create a rigid posture with your limbs against the opponent so that when they push against you your arms/legs do not collapse, closing the distance, but remain straight. This is analogous ...

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What is kubi-nage?
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6 votes

Kubi-nage appears to have been coined by Mikinosuke Kawaishi, as the earliest references to judo throws by this name appear in his works.2 3 He describes it as a hip-throw with the arm wrapped around ...

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Why is a gi worn left side over right?
6 votes

Origin of keikogi, and Japanese left-over-right dress tradition The uniforms of karate, aikido, kendo, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, sambo etc are derived from the uniforms of judo, which were themselves based ...

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Are hammerlocks (te-gatame) legal in judo competition?
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6 votes

Legality of te-gatame As one might infer from their presence in the video and current syllabus, the position of the Kodokan is that these bent-arm hammerlock versions of te-gatame are legal.1 2 3 The ...

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Source for Bruce Lee "Adapt What Is Useful" Quote
6 votes

Source of quote Bruce read widely and took aphorisms from many different sources, incorporating them into his writings on his own martial arts and philosophy. The idea behind this quote is ancient,1 ...

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Is the highest judo belt really red?
5 votes

9th-10th dan red belts The colour of belt associated with each kyu / dan grade depends on the organisation awarding the grades, which differs from country to country. However, it is generally standard ...

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What is the difference between Yama-arashi and Harai-goshi?
5 votes

Just to add to MattM's answer, here is how the Kodokan Throwing Techniques video illustrates the difference in the sweeps in the two throws: Technique Characteristics Example Yama-arashi - same side ...

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What submissions are not allowed in competitive Judo?
5 votes

According to the Sport and Organization Rules of the IJF (2019), the following applications of katame-waza are illegal: Kansetsu-waza Joint-locks applied anywhere other than the elbow (i.e. neck, ...

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What is the name of this throw that starts from a failed guillotine?
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5 votes

It's a suplex (ura-nage in judo terminology). Since standing headlocks are illegal in judo, it is rarely taught from this position, but here is an example of a mechanically similar belly-to-belly ...

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Is there a pin in Judo that cannot be classified as a standard pin?
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5 votes

Unconventional osaekomi-waza Most legally scoring pins come under one of the 10 osaekomi-waza classifications. However, I have seen a couple of unconventional pins which as far as I am aware do not ...

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What is the difference between Osoto-Otoshi and Osoto-Gari?
5 votes

The Kodokan Judo Nage-waza video illustrates the differences in its section on Osoto-otoshi: Let's look at the differences between osoto-gari and osoto-otoshi. If your opponent's foot goes ...

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Why is a "scarf hold" so-named if you don't wrap around the opponent's neck (like a scarf)?
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5 votes

When translating foreign technique names, sometimes there isn't a perfect analogue in the target language e.g. "tomoe" in tomoe-nage translated as 'circle'. The "kesa" (袈裟) in kesa-gatame in fact ...

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How do blood chokes actually work?
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5 votes

The following study (on hadaka-jime and nami-juji-jime) supports the claim that compression of the carotid (and vertebral) arteries is associated with loss of consciousness in judo-style chokes: By ...

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Why is ude-garami legal if it is effectively a shoulder lock?
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5 votes

What is an "elbow-lock"? While a common misconception, armlocks which cause pain to the shoulder are not inherently illegal in Judo. The phrasing "kansetsu-waza applied to the elbow joint" is used ...

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Disabled BJJ - worth a try?
5 votes

Adaptive Jiu Jitsu It is definitely possible to train and progress in BJJ with a spinal cord injury. Pete McGregor has the following advice when looking for a place to train: I will note that my ...

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Etymology of tomoe-nage?
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5 votes

Tomoe (巴) refers to a circular anti-symmetric symbol commonly found in Japanese heraldry. The usage in the judo throw specifically refers to the two-tailed version, futatsu-domoe: This is very ...

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How are armlocks categorised in Judo?
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5 votes

The Kodokan classifies armlocks according to the position tori adopts while applying them. As such this lock (sometimes called kannuki-gatame) is indeed a variant of ude-garami, since tori holds uke's ...

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Benefits of women only sessions
5 votes

In the following report from the Martial Arts Studies Research Network Engaging Women and Girls in Martial Arts and Combat Sports: Theoretical Issues and their Implications for Practice (2016), the ...

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Who was the first female judoka?
5 votes

The paper Reinterpreting the history of women's judo in Japan (2011) discusses in detail the history of women's involvement in judo from its earliest years, and how its style, purpose, and training ...

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Does practising judo increase the likelihood of sustaining a brain injury?
5 votes

According to the following paper, Injuries in judo: a systematic literature review including suggestions for prevention: severe injuries in judo are rare, but when they do occur they are mostly to ...

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