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So I've been boxing for a while now and I've learnt how to slip and weave, not that I'm very good at the technique. The way I've learnt it though, is that you mainly squat while pivoting to your back and lead foot for slipping; not gonna in too much detail. For weaving I just step widen my stance quickly and squat but then go back to normal stance etc. However when I watch boxers they seem to lean a lot or duck like mayweather.

Is this kind of head movement good technique?

It seems rather easy to do, I'm probably wrong and there's more to it but I don't know what that is.

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Leaning/ducking is bad technique for amateurs, let alone most pros. Leaning puts you off balance, and unless you have as much control over your balance and weight as Mayweather, it's really bad for you. You will have no snap in your punches and you will go down more easily.

Practice head movement while shadowboxing, i.e. double jab, then move head to the left. Constantly move the head, and practice it while sparring too - everytime you jab or move, move your head a bit. Just an inch might work well, especially if you roll with the punches.

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  • Why do people do it then? – Charlie Jul 12 '16 at 14:07
  • Because it CAN have an advantage, but unless you're at the very top both athletically and in terms of talent, the potential benefit you could achieve from doing so does not outweigh the potential bad consequences. It's like switching southpaw from orthodox; yes it looks fancy, and yes it can work well. But as a beginner/novice, it'll just hinder your progress and doesn't work in your favor at all. – cbll Jul 12 '16 at 14:13
  • What's the advantage – Charlie Jul 12 '16 at 19:49
  • Slick head movement and changing the distance to your opponent. But it's nullified if you don't have speed/reaction to utilize it at all. If you look at Floyd, he will roll with the punches that way, making punches hit less hard. – cbll Jul 13 '16 at 9:35
  • Sorry, I don't quite understand – Charlie Jul 14 '16 at 1:27

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