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This is a very subjective question, so I'll do my best to answer it. If you end up in a fight on the street, do you really want to start rolling on the floor for 5+ minutes working on a triangle choke? This all depends of course. If you look at this question that I asked a while ago, it shows that BJJ is GREAT for self defense against one opponent but ...


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I agree with mattm when he says that sport Judo is taught most commonly and that it will teach you poor habits for the street. I was fortunate enough to study under someone with good skills who teaches Judo for practical application. The stupid thing is: practical Judo can work in sport Judo, but not the other way around. I would research the Judo schools ...


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First, I practice judo and not BJJ, so understand what I can and cannot answer with knowledge and where my potential biases may be. Second, this is a common way to start an internet flame war. With that in mind, I will still try to answer this objectively. So is Judo better for self-defense while BJJ is better for a controlled sports-setting? No. ...


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Re-calibrate your expectations. Nobody invented throwing. Wrestling is pre-human. Mammals wrestle as both bonding and male-dominance-hierarchy behavior. Monkeys wrestle. Lions wrestle. The codification of wrestling and throwing is human, but still pre-historic. From the indigenous wrestling cultures that still exist we can infer that prehistoric people ...


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One useful approach to this problem comes from Patrick McCarthy, who (as far as I know) coined the term "habitual acts of physical violence" (HAPV). This was a good tool for him to persuade practitioners of Japanese, Okinawan, and Korean karate that stepping-lunge reverse punches are a unrealistic and unproductive way to train. McCarthy lists 36 such HAPVs, ...


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First, the science: https://rollingaroundbjj.com/fights-end-up-on-ground/ That article looked at 383 street fights which were available on Youtube. Never mind the fact that in order to make it onto Youtube in the first place, maybe something spectacular had to happen, or maybe it was just a stupid looking fight. Who knows. So the data set might be a tad ...


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"Israeli Jiu-Jitsu" seems to appear in two contexts: Describing BJJ and/or Japanese Jujutsu techniques as adapted and incorporated into some styles of Krav Maga (which has its origins in incorporating techniques from a variety of older martial arts: boxing, wrestling, judo etc), e.g. as taught by Roy Elghanayan. Describing Jiu-Jitsu organisations/schools/...


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