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14

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


14

Earliest examples of wrestling Wrestling has been a part of most societies since time-immemorial: Fresco in tomb 15 at Beni Hasan, Egypt ca. 2,000 BC. The earliest known historical European descriptions of wrestling techniques are from classical antiquity: Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 466 (c. 200 CE, Greece). And the earliest known manuals are from Chinese classics: ...


12

First, let me begin with "What do you mean by effective?" In this case, there is enough context that I think I know, but it can matter a lot. Very few martial arts are truly ineffective, but all of them are products of their environments and the needs of their founders. Muay Thai is brutal, and thus probably not the best choice for someone that needs to ...


9

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


8

Any art where you train vigorously and practice applying your techniques against a moving, unpredictable, uncooperative partner will develop self-defense skills and attributes. Judo, BJJ, boxing, kickboxing, SAMBO, MMA, and other arts are all reliable styles for finding that kind of training. The goal is to regularly practice sparring in class in order to ...


8

I won't get too academic about it, so I'll give you the layman's summary. And for the purpose of comparison, I'll emphasize the difference between Shotokan karate and Taekwondo, since Taekwondo derives from Shotokan directly. The differences increase greatly if you're talking about all of karate vs. Taekwondo. There are just too many branches of karate to ...


7

The book of five rings, written by Miyamoto Musashi around 1645, advocates two-sword fencing style (nitōjutsu): that is, wielding both katana and wakizashi. He does, however, states that you should use two long swords while training!!


7

What you should be learning First, I'll point out factors you want in any training aimed primarily at self defense. This is because there are schools, programs, workshops, etc. that claim to be about self defense and don't cover these things, and there are schools for sports martial arts or traditional/cultural martial arts that DO, and this is really the ...


7

Kano's memoirs describe his jujutsu training. Tenjin Shinyo Ryu under Hachinosuke Fukuda and Masatomo Iso Kito Ryu under Tsunetoshi Iikubo the Kito style was very different from the Tenjin Shinyo style jujutsu to which I had by then become well-accustomed. In Tenjin Shinyo, there are a range of strangulation techniques and groundwork hold-downs. On the ...


7

I think it's important to make a distinction between "someone, somewhere in the Judo community has used this at some point" and "this is widely known and used in mainstream or competition Judo". There have been Judo practitioners and training groups that focused heavily on groundwork - in particular, the Kosen Judo substyle. Just through convergent evolution,...


6

You're looking for something that isn't there. At most there is amateur and professional boxing with slightly different focuses, but boxing is made up of the four types of fighting you have dismissed as "tendencies during a fight". The tactics of a Swarmer, Out-boxer and Counter-puncher are so different that they may be called different styles, but they're ...


6

There are a few forms in Tenshinsho-den Katori Shinto ryu. I know they exist, but was not able to progress to that level in my local school. Here is a link to a video of the style. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2xmfyZSn80


6

No. He is not using aiki-jo - at least as I understand it. I've studied aiki-jo for several years, and I've done my best to learn what I can of related jo arts (SMRJ) I'm not going to claim that I'm an expert, or even that I'm competent, but what he is doing does not resemble what I do, the books, tapes or teachers I've studied. His wrist position is ...


6

The question is: What martial arts are similar to Wing Chun? The question does seem like it is open to interpretation. It depends on which aspects of Wing Chun you're looking at. But without going into every permutation of different attributes, I want to cut to the chase and mention one martial art that comes to my mind the most. That would be Southern ...


6

Double-jointedness, as a physical condition, is neither desirable nor of advantage in martial arts, and I speak here both from a medical and a first-hand experience perspective. And I clearly distinguish here between what is achieved by flexibility exercises and what is an unusual physical condition. It does in no way prevent you from being submitted in ...


6

As per what was mentioned in the comments, these are competition rules. But these arts do teach and practice face punches/strikes in their syllabus. I'd like to draw an example from my style: Kyokushin karate. It did have a category for bare knuckle face punches for awhile, but it was messy, it was bloody, and because the head (especially the face area) can ...


6

The question asks about the origins and lineage of Kuk Sool Won. In the past, I once had an interest in KSW as well. At various times, I've looked for this information, hoping that something authoritative would appear. To date, I have not found it. My tentative conclusion is that there is no widely accepted and verifiable source of historical documentation ...


6

First, the science: https://rollingaroundbjj.com/fights-end-up-on-ground/ That article looked at 383 street fights which were available on Youtube. Never mind the fact that in order to make it onto Youtube in the first place, maybe something spectacular had to happen, or maybe it was just a stupid looking fight. Who knows. So the data set might be a tad ...


5

In the videos you provided, it seems that his staff, standing up, is about shoulder height. In Japanese and Okinawan arts, that would make it more of a Jo staff than a Bo staff, which is usually a few inches taller than the wielder. While I am not well versed in Aikido, I am somewhat familiar with the Jo from years of karate and Okinawan kobudo training, and ...


5

Yes. Contrary to what the average "expert" on swords and Japanese swordsmanship will tell you online (along with their obligatory mentions to Miyamoto Musashi who everyone obligatorily must mention whenever dual-wielding Japanese swords is discussed even though in his own book he clearly states using two swords is nothing new in Japan and there ...


5

First of all, please no. Just don't. And no, it will not be effective. Even given that there are some people that can tow trains by ropes in their teeth, you cannot clench your jaw enough to be able to hold on to it if someone hits the blade. It will spin out, and if you are lucky, leave your teeth behind. Second, despite what they show in cartoons, you ...


5

My kids currently train under UKTF, which follows ITF guidelines and techniques. Will this cause problems if they move to a WTF trainer? They aren't quite at black belt yet, so I'm hoping that if they do transfer it won't be too much of a problem. It depends on your kids, really. It will take them time to get familiar with the WTF style of Taekwon-do. I was ...


5

While the answer can have all kinds of nuances, I suggest Krav Maga (full disclosure I practice it). My gf is 110lbs wet wearing boots, and takes Krav. She had no background in martial arts, and no real natural skill for it, but after training in KM for some time, she now has the confidence, knowledge, and skillset to adequately protect herself in many ...


5

What you're looking for is martial arts demographics. And you want world-wide demographics. Both of which seem kind of hard to come by. The demographics you're looking for might be along the lines of: how many people are there doing martial arts, what percentage of the population is currently practicing one or has ever practiced one, average time spent per ...


5

Short version: there's no one style, or school which you will find adequate data to make a useful comparison, there are, however, instructors and methods which are safer vs. more dangerous. Safety as a Goal The first thing to understand is that what we're talking about is harm reduction. The goal is to reduce injury and harm within reasonable efforts. ...


5

Hsing I (Xing Yi) is a direct and to the point efficient kung fu system not overly dependent on muscular strength. Its goal is to close the gap and seize the opponent's ground. It is an internal art. I Liq Chuan is also a very interesting art with sticky hands practice. These would be my choices in addition to Wing Chun.


5

Fundamentally, they are both combat sports that involve grappling and pinning. However, the rules result in different focuses in technique. In Judo, your points are based on the performance of a throw from a specified list of allowable techniques, and of subsequent control of your opponent. In Wrestling, you win by pinning your opponent, or forcing them out ...


5

Your plan does not account for messy realities of life, anyone you may meet, or anything you will learn along the way. Although most everyone has a preconceived idea of what training martials arts will do for them, these ideas often do not match up with reality. Arbitrary time scales Although you can request to be taught in a shortened one-year period, this ...


4

I'm not a boxer, I have almost zero boxing experience, but I've seen several valid approaches to footwork during the jab. The two I've been shown most commonly are a Jack Dempsey-style jab with a heavy forward step and a jab with no step, pivoting the front foot on the ball of the foot. I can't speak to the jabs you've seen or the examples you describe, but ...


4

You're a female, and you're mostly interested in self-defense. Presumably this is because you just want to be able to defend yourself in common real-life situations women might find themselves in. And you're worried that the class you enroll in will only teach things that are useful for much taller men. Briefly, my recommendation for you is to look at ...


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