33

What you're really asking for is insight into the strengths and weaknesses of Aikido pertaining to self-defense scenarios. Aikido uses a small number of throws, joint locks, submissions, and strikes. There are some holds and submissions done from the ground. A number of breakfalls are trained. There is some weapons training as well, notably the 4-foot Jo ...


22

Interesting... Assumptions Consider for a moment the "Chainsaw-Wielding Killer" of your apparent nightmares. Assume, for a moment, a weight of approximately 8.3 lbs. (Roughly 7.4 lbs. for a lightweight chainsaw, another .9 lbs. for fuel, using the Stihl MS 192 C-E as a guide) – roughly twice the weight of a european bastard sword. Said killer could: Wield ...


21

At first glance Krav Maga and Systema seem to be very similar in that they are both very unconventional, no-rules, practical self-defence, martial arts (although Krav isn't technically a martial art) which are no holds barred and generally formless. However... Krav Maga is basically a very raw, dangerous situation survival system (including avoidance and ...


17

There's this art form called Running. It defends against almost any handheld, especially heavy, melee weaponry. How to defend using Running Observe position of chainsaw and its wielder. Distance yourself out of arms (+ chainsaw) reach: this should be some six to eight feet. Turn away from the chainsaw. Engage feet and quads in Running. Do not stop until the ...


15

I want to be able to be prepared against any kind of opponent. You are looking for a unicorn there. No martial art whatsoever is able to do that. There is no ultimate fighting art. That said, most martial arts (McDojo excluded) can give you an edge in self defence. It will shift the odds in your favour which is a good thing. However, self defence is not ...


15

Stances Like squats or push-ups, stance training is often not directly about fighting, but in acquiring strength, flexibility, and coordination. Acrobatics Modern wushu is closer to gymnastics, a display of athleticism and not really for fighting. Large flashy movements have always been crowd-pleasers with questionable fighting utility. Kung fu is a rather ...


15

Regarding cardio, there's a saying in fitness that being fit for cardio in an activity makes you fit for cardio in that area. Take someone who can run for two hours at a time, and tell them to attack the heavy bag non-stop, and they'll be gasping within minutes. Similarly, take someone who has learned to keep punching and kicking the heavy bag for long ...


14

First off, consider therapy. I know that it's not exactly martial arts advice, but it sounds like you've undergone a great deal of trauma and frankly, us just giving you training advice would be like giving cadence tips to a runner with a broken leg. You have been damaged and you need a qualified medical professional to help you with that damage. Past that, ...


14

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


14

Running seems like it is the thing for you: You can start now and improve your techniques by going to the gym to find a trainer, going to a run club, and reading books and magazines on running. You can also get a whistle and blow it (while running to a safe place) to attract attention to your predicament. Martial arts take long time to learn. Self defence ...


14

Protecting yourself from bullying has more to do about confidence than about martial arts. Learning martial arts will raise your confidence, but coming across as unsure and uncertain, even if you're a grandmaster, will still get you bullied. Because of that reason, the style of kungfu matters less. The club you go to and your trainer matters more. Make sure ...


14

I don't think it's possible to give an answer to such a broad question, other than to say something along the lines of It can be, to the extent that... It trains on realistic, damage-inflicting strikes, with "realistic" indicating targeting realistic targets (e.g., knife hands to the neck are not open if the guy has his guard up), and not many (if ...


13

No absolute measure I do not think an absolute measure can be determined as the skill, training, and physical differences between participants in addition to local environmental factors would make any measure meaningless. However, I have a few ideas… Woolly Measures If those were more woolly, they would baa… Simplicity The martial art needs to be ...


13

Source: Black Belt in Ju Jitsu First, I completely agree that learning to fight won't fix your problem; it'll probably just get you into trouble. However, learning a martial art is a great way to build confidence and THAT can definitely help with the bullying (speaking from experience here). One thing to note though, is that NO martial art is "fast and ...


12

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer nor do I play one on TV. So, whatever I say has no legal value whatsoever. That said... The law is a complex beast and unless you are a good criminal defence lawyer whatever you think you know about self defence is probably wrong, or at best incomplete. Laws change country to country, state to state, and even county to county. ...


12

At that distance you are most in danger of a headbutt. Firstly, don't find yourself in that situation. When things start to get hairy, lift up your arms to about chest height, with PALMS FACING OUTWARD IN A NON-MENACING WAY so as to show you want to avoid confrontation. Any cameras (security or people with camera-phones) will show you to be the non-...


12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


12

First, let me begin with "What do you mean by effective?" In this case, there is enough context that I think I know, but it can matter a lot. Very few martial arts are truly ineffective, but all of them are products of their environments and the needs of their founders. Muay Thai is brutal, and thus probably not the best choice for someone that needs to ...


11

I note your question is tagged with just self-defence - what I explain here can be applied whether you are practicing an established martial art or just a bunch of self defence type moves. There is an exercise in a number of Japanese arts (karate, ninjutsu, aikido and more) called Tai Sabaki. It involves doing the same repeated sequence of moves (whatever ...


11

The answer is simple: Because the vast majority of karate is taught by instructors who don't know what realistic bunkai is. And that's because their instructors were never taught it. And their instructors' instructors were never taught it, etc. This goes back many generations. But why? I gave a good overview of the subject at this link. And you should ...


10

This is a tricky one to answer without knowing more about your specific situation. If I have misconstrued your question then please add more detail so others don't also get the same impression. Are you a willing participant, or an unwilling one? If you are unwilling, to what degree? Is it just a casual nuisance (someone comes home from training and wants ...


10

You have two requests here. First, you can learn to defend yourself against an average person relatively quickly - just as much as you can learn basic first aid, relatively quickly. Whether it will be enough or not really depends on the luck of the draw of the situation you face. Going to train once or twice a week, for a few months, in a school aimed ...


10

In Japanese styles, it is unquestionably about cleanliness. They don't wear outside shoes in one's home, and zori are used for that purpose. But zori make it somewhat difficult to train in, and as well, expensive tatami mats do not wear well with shoes worn. So, they train barefoot. I've seen many a Japanese instructor painstakingly give the hairy ...


9

I just love those self defence myths. First, unless you have trained punching people with keys in between your fingers, the result will be as much (if not more) damage to yourself as with the target. You may drop your keys as a result of the impact and pain which means that you lost your keys. Punch Injuries: Insights into Intentional Closed Fist Injuries ...


9

In a case where you have to face more than one opponent, in a case where putting someone into submission is not enough to end the fight: If you're more comfortable with the idea of using submissions, then you can train for that: arts/skills such as Chin-Na, some schools of jujitsu, hapkido, aikido... all teach joint locks that let you control one opponent ...


9

Unfortunately, some martial arts as practiced in the training hall are unsuitable for general use in street fights. The danger with high kicks is not just the surface as mentioned by cs1971, there are other factors too: high kicks are slower (they have further to travel) you are more vulnerable during the delivery and retraction stages of the kick ...


9

So I'm assuming that you mean someone sitting on another person putting pressure on their neck via their knee. I find this to be interesting timing for this question, because a few days ago a man was killed in Minnesota after a police officer sat on his neck using his knee for more than 8 minutes. So that brings us to our first example: Police Training ...


8

If someone is more willing to fight than you, more athletic than you, and better at fighting than you, you will usually lose. Try not to be in that situation.


8

What is the most effective method for the roundhouse kick? You've got a one-adjective criteria there, and a vague one: effective. Overall effectiveness might reasonably be defined as what helps you win reliably, or perhaps you'd prefer something less reliable if it meant the average or median injury you sustain is less even though the worst case outcome's ...


8

There's two goals here, and they don't necessarily overlap. Less harmful techniques The techniques less likely to result in serious injury or death for your opponent(s) are to restrain them. Unfortunately, restraining them requires tying up part of your body to do so - limiting your mobility and your ability to defend yourself against others. These ...


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